BarbWire: 'Pray That God Cuts Short The Obama Presidency, And Punishes All Those Who Enabled It'

Matt Barber’s website BarbWire has published yet another column calling on God to remove President Obama from office.

Lee Duigon writes today that Americans should “pray that God cuts short the Obama presidency, and punishes all those who enabled it, and erases their foul works from the face of the earth.”

He asks God to “save us” from Obama — whom he claims is more focused on “cracking down” on Christians over gay marriage than enforcing immigration laws — and his supporters: “Rid us of these wicked, lawless rulers. Amen.”

What does the Bible say is the purpose of the civil government? “Rulers” are to be a terror to evildoers (Romans 13:3). But the Obama Regime does everything backwards, so now the government is a terror to peaceable, law-abiding citizens, and the criminals’ best friend.



Want to break our immigration laws? Well, come on in! There will be a slight delay while the “president” draws up an executive order giving you all blanket amnesty, but in the meantime, help yourselves to all the freebies you can grab. The stupid American taxpayer is paying for it.

And don’t worry about law enforcement! We’ve got all we can handle, cracking down on bake sales, Christian bakers who won’t create cakes for same-sex imitation weddings, and all those “war on women” malefactors who don’t what to be forced to pay for someone else’s abortion.

People, please… Pray that God cuts short the Obama presidency, and punishes all those who enabled it, and erases their foul works from the face of the earth.

We have sinned against the Lord, and this Regime has been imposed on us as a scourge. But now the tool used by the Lord boasts itself against Him, and takes His name in vain. We confess our sins, O God–now save us. Not for our sakes, but for your own holy name’s sake.

Rid us of these wicked, lawless rulers. Amen.

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Bryan Fischer Cites Mysterious Red River In China As Proof That Everything The Bible Says Is Literally True

On his radio broadcast today, Bryan Fischer seized upon a story about a river in eastern China that mysteriously turned dark red over the weekend, pointing to it as evidence that the Bible can always be trusted since this is exactly what happened in the Book of Exodus.

Saying that this situation is "exactly what you read in the Old Testament account," Fischer proclaimed that "if this could happen, a large river could mysteriously, instantaneously turn blood red in 2014, it could also happen in 1446 B.C."

"Do not abandon your belief in trustworthiness of the Word of God," he concluded.

There is one small difference, of course, since in the story in Exodus the river was turned literally into blood and was not the result of someone illegally dumping dye or chemicals into the river, which is what is suspected of having happened in China.

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Glenn Beck Says Obama Wants Impeachment Threats Because It Will Help Pass Immigration Reform

On his radio program today, Glenn Beck argued that nobody in the GOP is seriously calling for President Obama's impeachment, but Democrats and the media keep talking about it because doing so will help Obama pass immigration reform.

Saying that there is not one person within the Republican Party that is seriously considering impeaching Obama (despite the fact that he totally deserves it), nor even seriously making the case, Beck said that the issue keeps being brought up nonetheless, linking it to the immigration debate by warning that progressives are winning the fight over immigration reform by framing it in terms of "justice" rather than "freedom. "

Conservatives are going to lose the P.R battle, he warned, because "the president is going to change the subject and he's going to make it about impeachment."

"So who wants it?" Beck asked, rhetorically. "The president does, because then he'll be able to say 'I demand justice.'"

Impeachment, Beck explained, is just like the birther and race issues in that they were also ginned up by Democrats and the media, not conservatives and Republicans, in order to help Obama.

"The birther thing is over, the black thing is over," he said, "so now he needs to be able to call for justice" by using the threat of impeachment to promote his political agenda:

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Jody Hice: Americans Must 'Rise Up' To Defend God's Laws In Government, Ten Commandments

In a 2003 interview with the Trinity Broadcasting Network, right-wing pastor Jody Hice, who is now the GOP nominee for an open U.S. House seat in Georgia, claimed that America must follow God’s law or slide down a slippery slope to catastrophe.

Hice, who also told host Ben Kinchlow that Satan is to blame for legal efforts to separate church and state, warned of “disastrous” attempts to “shove God’s law out of the way” in public life.

After Kinchlow said that without “Judeo-Christian” principles in government “people end up killing each other,” Hice claimed that the Ten Commandments “predate Christianity” and therefore do not represent an establishment of religion.

Hice also described his campaign to place copies of the Ten Commandments throughout public buildings is part of a spiritual battle to save America.

“Are we going to be a nation that is led by people who acknowledge God? Who acknowledge God’s law and acknowledge the role of God’s law in our society and the founding of our country? Or are we going to be led by people who totally reject God?” Hice continued. “It’s a frightening thing if we don’t rise up.”

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Heritage Foundation Fellow Trots Out Radical Nullification Argument Against Marriage Equality

The anti-marriage-equality movement seems to have anointed Ryan T. Anderson as its next intellectual leader. Anderson, who is now a fellow at the Heritage Foundation, follows in the footsteps of his mentor Robert P. George and National Organization for Marriage founder Maggie Gallagher in being able to talk about the marriage issue without spewing fire and brimstone or talking about how gay people make them want to vomit .

This kinder, gentler approach has endeared Anderson and his predecessors to a movement that’s trying to snatch its image away from the likes of Bryan Fischer and Pat Robertson.

But it also can obscure the fact that Anderson’s supposedly intellectual arguments against marriage equality can still be far out of the mainstream.

On Friday, Heritage promoted on its website a video clip of Anderson speaking at a Stanford University event, where he was asked by an attendee why he, as a gay man, should not be able to file a joint tax return if he gets legally married in California.

Anderson responded that legally married same-sex couples should not have access to all the trappings of legal marriage, because while in some states they can “be issued a marriage license,” they “can’t actually get married” because marriage is inherently a union of a man and a woman.

This is basically a nullificationist argument against benefits for legally married same-sex couples. Like those who argue that gun laws or health care reform aren’t actually law because they violate their impression of what the Constitution says, Anderson is saying that even legal, state-sanctioned marriages don’t count because they violate his view of what marriage is, and therefore should not earn legal, state-sanctioned benefits.

Far from trying to brush over this nullificationist argument against marriage equality, Heritage is actively promoting the video to its followers.

The full clip is four minutes long, but the fun really starts at about the 2:10 mark.

Anderson: The reason that you should not have the option of filing a joint tax return is that you can’t get married, given what marriage is.

Questioner: But I could in California, I can get married.

Anderson: You can be issued a marriage license in the state of California, but you can’t actually get married. And I’m sorry to say it that way, but given what marriage is, a union of sexually complementary…

Questioner: How is that not discrimination?

Anderson: And it’s not discrimination, because everyone is equally eligible for entering into the marital relationship, where you understand marriage as a union of sexually complementary spouses, a permanent, exclusive union of man and a woman, husband and wife, mother and father. If you’re not interested in entering into that sort of a union, you’re not being discriminated against.

What you’re asking us to do is to redefine marriage to include the adult relationship of your choice. And the adult relationship of your choice happens to be a same-sex couple. There are other adults who want to have marriage redefined to include the relationship of their choice, which may be the same-sex throuple or the opposite-sex quartet. So what I’m asking you in response is, what principle are you appealing to when you say this is discrimination to vindicate your rights but not their rights? Because it seems to me that your position ultimately leaves to simply the dissolvement of the marital union.

It’s not that you don’t have a right to get married, it’s that you aren’t seeking out marriage. Marriage is by nature a union of sexually complementary spouses, a union of man and woman, husband and wife, mother and father. And based on just what you’ve said about yourself, it doesn’t sound like you’re interested in forming that sort of a union. It sounds like you’re interested in forming a union with another man, and that’s not a marriage. So that’s why I don’t think the law should treat the relationship that you want to form as a marriage.

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Another Ex-Gay Leader Renounces Movement, Religious Right's Anti-Gay Tactics

In the latest blow to the ex-gay movement, GLAAD today posted an essay from ex-gay activist Yvette Cantu Schneider denouncing the movement.

Schneider once spoke along with John Paulk, an ex-gay representative for Focus on the Family who also left the movement and now says he is gay, on a panel with the ex-gay group NARTH on the legitimacy of ex-gay pseudo-science, and was featured in a Family Research Council statement as “living proof that homosexuals can change.”

Jeremy Hooper details how Schneider was a top ex-gay advocate for several Religious Right groups:

Yvette Cantu Schneider has one of the most robust pedigrees of anyone who has ever worked in the so-called "ex-gay" movement. From the late nineties right through to the second decade of the twenty-first century, Yvette managed to find herself laboring for and with just about every top anti-LGBT group and activist you've heard of. From her high-profile start at the Family Research Council to her work with California's Proposition 8 campaign—with many stops, at many different groups and campaigns along the way—Yvette became one of that movement's most visible faces and certainly one of the most known women in a line of "work" known mainly for its male spokespeople.

To this day, Yvette remains one of the key people who anti-gay voices like to cite in order to prove that "change" works. In a December 19, 2013, press release concerning the Duck Dynasty brouhaha, notorious anti-gay activist Peter LaBarbera, who was a colleague of Yvette's during their shared time at the Family Research Council, cited Schnieder as an example of a person who has "ovecome homosexuality through faith in Jesus Christ." "Ex-gay" websites continue to list her as among their ranks and push her story as a source of inspiration. The American Family Association continues to sell a video, "It's Not Gay," in which Yvette appears as a talking head. They all still claim Yvette as being both an example and a worker bee for their side.



In a nutshell: Yvette no longer wishes to identify with the "ex-gay" or anti-LGBT movement; is sorry for the pain she caused as part of that world; is highly questioning of the idea of "ex-gay" itself; and is now fully supportive of LGBT people, our truths, and our families. Yvette has made her sincerity clear to me, saying "as opposed to when I was doing things for the Christian Right out of duty and obligation, I'm doing it because I want to and feel it's the right thing to do." She hopes that by speaking out, she can start to undo any damage she might've helped to impart.

Schneider writes for GLAAD about how she played a part on behalf of the Religious Right’s anti-gay political agenda:

That evening was the Fine Line event in support of Proposition 8 at The Rock Church in San Diego. It would be simulcast to churches across California in an attempt to sway the God-loving, church-going faithful to vote for a constitutional amendment defining marriage as the union between a man and woman. I was a panelist; the token “ex-gay” spokesperson, chosen to vouch for the evangelical Christian belief that while people may not choose to be gay, they can certainly choose not to stay gay. Every detail of the event had been pre-planned and rehearsed. The texts, phone calls, and emails from viewers and attendees asking questions were actually written and recorded in advance by those of us who would serve on the panel. But for some reason, as the event drew near, I couldn’t shake the nerves. My heart wasn’t in this event; deep down I knew I didn’t belong here. But I played my part, and delivered my lines.

This young woman adored her father, and wanted things in their household to remain as they had always been. She feared that the advent of gay marriage would ruin any chance of her father staying with the family. I told her she didn’t have the power to change anyone; no one does. The best she could do was to love and spend time with her father. He was still the same man she had always known and loved. As she sobbed over the breakup of her parents and family, an errant thought darted through my head: If we as a society didn't condemn homosexuality, gay people wouldn't feel pressured into marrying heterosexually, against their true attractions, and families wouldn't be torn apart when the gay spouse could no longer continue the ruse. I had seen a number of gay Christians marry an opposite sex partner, only to leave when they couldn't pretend any longer. It wasn't fair to the spouse, the kids, or themselves. My doubts about the efficacy of change and the evangelical Christian stance against gay rights of any kind nagged at me.



I spent the next few years digging deep within my soul to unearth my true self--the authentic me who celebrates the worthiness and equality of all people. The me who knows we all deserve to be who we are, not who others want and expect us to be. It was only when I embraced this true self that I regained my life. It meant shedding many of the beliefs I had espoused for decades—beliefs about what it means to be gay, and what it means to treat people with dignity and respect.

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Jody Hice Warns Satan Is Behind Plot To 'Chip Away' At 'Our Christian Rights'

Jody Hice, the Georgia pastor and radio host who recently won the GOP nomination to succeed Paul Broun in the U.S. House, appeared on TBN’s “Praise The Lord” program in 2003 to promote his campaign to defy “judicial terrorists” by placing copies of Ten Commandments in public buildings.

While speaking to host Ben Kinchlow, Hice alleged that Satan is “infiltrating our society” through efforts to separate church and state and is behind judges who have “chipped away” at “our Christian rights.”

Hice also warned that the world is in the Last Days: “We have very few years, I certainly can’t put any time limit, but as rapidly as our world is changing and our nation is changing, we have little time.”

He added that America is transforming into Europe, a continent so overcome with “depravity” that “you can feel the darkness with the removal of God from society.”

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Maryland GOPer Michael Peroutka Leads Dixie 'National Anthem' At Southern Secessionist Conference

Warren Throckmorton has dug up video of the Institute on the Constitution’s Michael Peroutka — the GOP candidate for a seat on a Maryland county council — speaking at the 2012 conference of the secessionist League of the South, and it’s a doozy.

Peroutka’s ties with the League of the South are hardly a secret — he used to sit on the group’s board and has asked for its members help in his campaign — but in his 2012 speech, he made it clear that he agrees with the group’s stand that the South may need to secede and cause the “destruction” of the current “regime.”

“I don’t disagree with Dr. Hill at all that this regime is beyond reform,” he told the crowd, referring to League of the South president Michael Hill. But he told group members he was concerned that what he calls the "biblical view" of government should “survive the secession.”

“I don’t want people from League of the South to think for one minute that I’m about reforming the current regime, or studying the Constitution is about reforming the current regime,” he said. “I, like many of you, and like Patrick Henry, probably have come to the conclusion that we smelled a rat from the beginning.”

He then asked the crowd to “stand for the national anthem”…and led the crowd in a spirited rendition of “Dixie.”

Peroutka’s influence on the Religious Right extends beyond his foray into local politics. He was the 2004 Constitution Party nominee for president, he is a great ally and funder of Religious Right hero and Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, he makes a weekly appearance with influential Iowa conservative talk show host Steve Deace (and recently helped Deace launch a new fetal “personhood” group), and he recently donated a $1 million dinosaur skeleton to the Creation Museum.

Late last week, the Republican candidate for county executive in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, where Peroutka is running for office, asked Peroutka to resign from the League of the South because his membership “could be considered racist.”

The candidate, Steve Schuh, however, reported from his conversation with Peroutka: “He has assured me that he is not a racist and that he believes in the equality of all members of the human family. He has further assured me that he does not believe in secession of any portion of our country.”

We’ve clipped a couple pieces of Peroutka’s League of the South speech here, but you can find the whole thing, which was recorded by an attendee, in Throckmorton’s post.

Todd Akin: September 11 Attacks Proved Liberals Are Wrong About Everything

In the second part of his sad, self-pitying interview with WorldNetDaily editor Joseph Farah last week, Todd Akin argued that the September 11, 2001 attacks shocked liberals into “silence,” arguing that liberals don’t believe “there are really bad people in this world” and “don’t think we need any defense in America.”

While he spent most of the interview criticizing Hillary Clinton for representing an accused rapist while working as a defense attorney for a legal aid group in Arkansas — because apparently individuals suspected of committing crimes do not deserve representation in court — he then complained that “we almost live in a culture where people want to believe something even though it isn’t true.”

The former Missouri congressman and failed Republican Senate candidate went on to say that 9/11 disproved everything liberals believe, leaving them “shocked to find that one of their life premises was totally wrong.”

“You can drive your Prius around with your yoga stickers and whatever, but these people still hate you,” he said. “Liberals want to believe, ‘can’t we all love each other, coexist?’ A coexist sticker didn’t keep those planes from hitting the towers.”

Akin also complained that he went through an “execution” during his failed bid for the U.S. Senate and called Mike Huckabee, who campaigned for him and wrote the foreword to his new book, a “champ” for standing by him.

He also thanked Newt Gingrich, Tony Perkins, Oliver North, David Barton and Farah for “having the courage” to support him throughout the campaign.

The Religious Right Makes Friends Across The Atlantic

BuzzFeed’s Lester Feder is out with an investigative report today on the rise of Europe’s own homegrown Religious Right. Feder cites People For the American Way’s research into funding going from American groups to the European Right — including from Alliance Defending Freedom, the American Center for Law and Justice, and, surprisingly, the fringe anti-choice group Personhood USA — but also notes that a lot of the movement’s energy is travelling in the opposite direction across the Atlantic.

Feder reports, for instance, that last month’s sparsely attended March for Marriage in Washington, D.C., was followed by a very well-attended gathering of representatives from about 70 countries who “met to discuss creation of an International Organization for Marriage.”

A review of tax disclosures conducted by the progressive advocacy group People for the American Way found that several U.S. groups — many of which boomed in the 1990s — had recently invested in conservative drives across Europe: The American Center for Law and Justice, founded by Pat Robertson, sent $1.1 million to its European branch, the European Center for Law and Justice, in 2012, which is the most recent year for which tax disclosures are available. Another group founded by well-known American social conservatives called the Alliance Defending Freedom spent more than $750,000 on European programs that year. The Federalist Society, which promotes conservative legal philosophy, reported spending nearly $800,000 in “conferences and seminars” in Europe that year. Personhood USA, a small Colorado-based group that has tried to pass ballot measures that would give fetuses the legal status of “persons” — a strategy for rolling back abortion rights that is controversial even among pro-life activists — poured $400,000 into Europe in 2012, just after one of its ballot measures went down in flames in Mississippi. (Personhood USA President Keith Mason declined to answer questions from BuzzFeed about which organizations received the funds or what they were used for.)

But while there are links to the U.S., the movement is very much homegrown. Arsuaga said neither HazteOír nor CitizenGo get funding from U.S. groups — and they don’t need it. Arsuaga said 99% of HazteOír’s 1.9 million euro ($2.5 million) annual budget comes from donations from Spanish citizens. CitizenGo has been raising 30,000 to 40,000 euros (roughly $40,000 to $55,000) each month from the 1.2 million members it’s signed up worldwide since its October launch.

Today, American ties seem much more about a shared vision to build a global conservative movement rather than leaning on stronger and wealthier U.S. partners for support. Arsuaga, Volontè, and La Manif Pour Tous President Ludovine de La Rochère were all in Washington on June 19 to support the National Organization for Marriage’s March for Marriage. Their more important business, however, might have been in a closed-door summit the next day, where representatives of around 70 countries met to discuss creation of an International Organization for Marriage, according to Volontè and another participant. A follow-up meeting is planned for next year.

Many LGBT rights supporters mocked the March for Marriage’s paltry turnout. So these Europeans appeared as if they were there to encourage a beleaguered movement, not the other way around — they now possess the vigor that has evaporated from the U.S. movement as opposition to marriage equality has collapsed.

We have reported on how American anti-gay groups, frustrated in their mission at home, are quietly working to form alliances with activists, politicians and funders in Europe, Russia and South America.

The strange case of Personhood USA’s $400,000 expenditure in Europe in 2012 —which represented more than one-third of its total spending that year — offers a clue that a similar dynamic may be happening in the extreme anti-choice movement. While Feder notes that most of the funding for recent viral anti-choice campaigns in Europe has been homegrown, and Personhood USA refused to say what its European shopping spree went toward, the personhood movement could be hoping that it can reclaim some of its energy by looking overseas.

It’s also important to note that the anti-gay and anti-choice movements on both sides of the Atlantic have significant overlap. One example: Last year, National Organization for Marriage President Brian Brown — who has worked extensively with European and Russian anti-gay groups — joined the board of CitizenGo, a conservative platform modeled on MoveOn.org that Feder reports recently helped to defeat a comprehensive sex-ed proposal in the European Parliament.