Jim Garlow

Jim Garlow: Marriage Equality Ruling Would Make Supreme Court 'The Laughingstock Of Historians And The World'

At today’s March for Marriage, Pastor Jim Garlow offered a lengthy explanation for why he believes marriage equality is wrong, asking the audience to repeat several Hebrew words found in Genesis before rearranging the letters to make the word “fire,” which of course proves that if you allow marriage equality you are going to Hell.

“You mess with the definition of marriage, and you burn, you’re toast, you can’t win that one,” he said.

This explanation is so obvious, he said, that if the Supreme Court rules in favor of marriage equality this year, it will soon become a “laughingstock” for having promoted the “ridiculous” idea of legal marriage for gay and lesbian people.

“Quoting from the Broadway musical, I would say this to the Supreme Court,” he said. “‘Your arms are too short to box with God.’ You can’t mess with Him. You can’t change the definition of marriage. If you try, they will laugh at you in 25 or 50 years. This Supreme Court, if they try to change that definition, they’ll be laughed at, they’ll be scoffed at. ‘How ridiculous was this notion?’ And this whole concept of so-called ‘same-sex marriage’ will be on the ash heap of history and the Supreme Court will be the laughingstock of historians and the world. They cannot change what God has established.”

Anti-Gay Activists Reduced To Hoping Future Generations Will Repeal Gay Marriage If America Survives That Long

James Dobson once again dedicated his daily radio program today to a discussion of the Supreme Court's upcoming gay marriage case with anti-gay activists Brian Brown, Maggie Gallagher, and Jim Garlow.

Unlike previous programs in which Religious Right leaders bemoaned the string of calamities that will befall this nation if gay marriage is legalized, today's show had a rather more hopeful feel, as Garlow and Gallagher took solace in the idea that gay marriage will prove to be so utterly horrible for the country that eventually the American people will realize the error of their ways and do away with it, provided that the nation actually survives long enough to do so.

"We, in this country, are learning to gear up for resistance and we are not giving up under any condition," Garlow said. "The devastation from this could come so severely that, years from now, if the nation is not completely destroyed, that we could see a recycling and a re-visiting of God's purpose for marriage."

Dobson was less enthusiastic, wondering just how much "damage will be done to how many people" in the interim.

"Horrific," Garlow said. "Horrific. But wars do that, unfortunately."

Garlow then went on to marvel that we are even having debates over issues like abortion and marriage, declaring that it is "shocking how far we've gone towards Nazi Germany and other kinds of dictatorships of this magnitude," which prompted Gallagher to weigh in and declare that Christians will win this battle in the end.

"I think it's going to get very bad out there," she said. "And I think, just as it did in the early days of the Roman Empire, that there is going to be a sense that, if we do our jobs, that Christianity offers the only real alternative to an increasingly debauched public square":

Garlow: The Purpose Of Government Is To Function As 'A Minister Of God'

Jim Garlow was a guest on Bryan Fischer's "Focal Point" radio program today to promote the upcoming "Future Conference" that Garlow will be hosting at his San Diego church. During the course of the conversation, the two men began discussing the effort being led by radical Christian nationalist David Lane to recruit 1,000 pastors to run for political office, which Garlow proclaimed was an absolute necessity because the true purpose of government is to function as "a minister of God."

"If you live in a constitutional republic or a democracy, as we do," Garlow said, "that means it behooves us as followers of Christ to make sure our government functions for the purpose for which it was created, specifically to be the minister of God.... We are in a constitutional republic where we the people determine what our government is and so consequently, as followers of Christ, we're commanded to be involved and to make sure the government functions as a minister of God":

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 2/4/15

  • ALIPAC declares that we are "seeing what is possibly one of the greatest scandals in American history emerge regarding the millions of illegal extra work visas Obama's shadow government apparatus has handed out!"
  • Jim Garlow will be hosting Newt Gingrich and several other Religious Right and New Apostolic Reformation activists for a conference at his church in June.
  • Similarly, Jan Markell will be hosting Robert Jeffress and former Rep. Michele Bachmann at a conference in October.
  • Was Gov. Bobby Jindal's prayer rally the fulfillment of one of Cindy Jacobs' prophecies?
  • Charles C. Johnson is asking the tough questions!
  • Finally, a documentary based upon John Hagee's "Four Blood Moons" book and featuring the likes of David Barton and Dinesh D'Souza will be getting a special one-night showing in theaters on March 23.

Bobby Jindal's Oddly Political Non-Political Prayer Rally

On Friday, the night before Gov. Bobby Jindal's "The Response" prayer rally, Rachel Maddow took a look at the "questionable characters" who were helping him organize and promote the event, prompting Jindal to send a statement to Maddow insisting that his rally would be "a prayer event, not a political rally."

Participants in the rally, of course, did not particularly see it that way. In addition to a segment dedicated to praying for an end to legal abortion in America, several speakers noted how getting right-wing Christians elected to public office was key to bringing reformation and revival to America.

Pastor Jim Garlow, who spoke right before Jindal shared his personal testimony and call for revival, spent most of his time railing against IRS regulations that prohibit pastors from endorsing political candidates from their tax-exempt pulpits. Garlow closed out his remarks by suggesting that America may be in the midst of another great religious revival, judging by the number of members of Congress "who really know Christ as Savior."

"We have more freshman members of the House of Representatives who understand biblical truth than we have had for decades," Garlow proclaimed excitedly, noting that the same thing is happening in state legislative chambers all over the nation.

"We are a generation that has a vision of reformation," he said. "We can see it. We can hear the sounds of it and in our lifetimes, we are going to experience it. Let's join together in prayer for the great reformation. Jesus as king of our land!"

Later in the event, Pastor Jacob Aranza of Our Savior's Church in Lafayette, Louisiana, prayed explicitly for conservative Christians to run for and win political office. Aranza even brought three members of his own church who had all been elected to public office out onto the stage as examples, including Louisiana state Sen. Jonathan Perry, who audibly heard the voice of God tell him to run for office "while giving the largest tithe check he'd ever given" to Aranza's church.

"Father, today we know that you are raising up men and women of God across this nation," Aranza prayed. "And Father now, in the name of Jesus, we pray for the elected officials. We pray for every elected city councilman, we pray for mayors. We pray for senators. We pray for state representatives. We pray for the marshals, the sheriffs,  the school board officials. Lord, we ask you in the name of Jesus, send revival to every elected official we have, oh God. We know that when revival is when you get so sick of being misrepresented that you just show up yourself. Show up in every elected official, Lord, all throughout our state, may the glory of God come ... Maybe it be known because now righteous leaders are in authority and when the righteous are in authority, the people rejoice!"

The Real Problems With Bobby Jindal And His Prayer Rally

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal skipped an Iowa stage crowded with Republican presidential wannabes on Saturday so he could host a prayer rally on the campus of Louisiana State University. Jindal and others have mischaracterized objections to the rally, suggesting that its critics were somehow out to silence people of faith. So let’s be clear about the real issue: Bobby Jindal used the power and prestige of his office to promote an event backed by some of the nation’s most religiously divisive and stridently anti-gay activists. And in a bid to boost his own political future, he sent a clear message of support for the Christian-nation views of the event’s extremist organizers.

Christians Only, Please

Let’s start with the invitation, sent on Jindal’s official state letterhead. “We are in need of spiritual and transforming revival,” he wrote, “if we are to recapture the vision of our early leaders who signed on the Mayflower, ‘In the name of God and for the advancement of the Christian faith.’” Leadership to solve the country’s problems “will not come from a politician or a movement for social change,” he wrote in this time of civil rights movement anniversaries. So how will we solve our problems? “Jesus Christ, Son of God and the Lord of Life, is America’s only hope.” In a separate letter he wrote to the other 49 governors inviting them to his rally to pray for “spiritual revival” and “heaven’s intervention” over the country. “There will only be one name lifted up that day – Jesus!”

What does all this suggest to non-Christian Americans (including non-Christian governors) about how Jindal views their contributions? Jindal’s letters reflect the attitudes of rally organizer David Lane, a political strategist who believes America was founded by and for Christians. The event was paid for by the American Family Association, whose chief spokesman, radio host Bryan Fischer, believes the First Amendment’s religious liberty protections apply only to Christians.

The rally was also a showcase for the dominionist views of self-proclaimed “apostles” who promoted and spearheaded the event. One of those “apostles” was the event’s emcee. Doug Stringer has called the 9/11 attacks “a wake-up call” that happened because God was not around to defend America due to abortion, homosexuality, and kicking God out of public schools. While introducing Jindal, Stringer made a brief mention to “Seven Mountains” theology, which states that all the “mountains” in society – arenas like business, entertainment, and government – must be led by the right kind of Christian. A later speaker, Gene Mills of the Louisiana Family Forum, spent more time on the “Seven Mountains.” Mills said these spheres of influence belong to God, but are currently occupied by the “enemy.” They therefore need to be evangelized and “occupied by the body of Christ.”

Not Political? Not Credible

Jindal and organizer David Lane declared, unbelievably, that the rally was not political. Lane is a self-described political strategist who works to turn conservative evangelical churches into voter turnout machines for right-wing candidates and causes. Lane is trying to get 1,000 conservative evangelical pastors to run for public office, and he held a recruiting session the day before the prayer rally. Jindal and Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma were among the speakers. Another example of the disconnect between rhetoric and reality: Stringer made the claim that the rally was not meant to lift up any politicians while he was standing in front of a huge screen featuring a quote from Bobby Jindal.

The “not political” claim was hard to take seriously given the amount of time devoted to making abortion illegal and declarations that what will tip the scales will be the “the voice of the church in the voting booth.” Jim Garlow, who led church organizing for California’s anti-gay Proposition 8, and who believes the marriage equality movement is demonic, dropped all “nonpolitical” pretense, railing against marriage equality and IRS regulations that restrict the involvement of churches in electoral politics.

Opponents = Enemies

One of the biggest problems with treating politics as spiritual warfare is that you turn your political opponents into spiritual enemies. People who disagree with you on public policy issues are not just wrong, but evil, or even satanic. That makes it pretty hard to work together or find compromise.

In daily prayer calls leading up to the rally, organizers prayed for God to forgive students who were organizing protests, as if disagreeing with Bobby Jindal were a sin – or a form of anti-Christian persecution. “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do,” prayed call leaders, comparing their pleas to Jesus asking God to forgive those who crucified him, and Saint Stephen asking for mercy for those who were stoning him to death. On one call, a prayer leader decreed a “no-go zone for demons” over the sports arena where the event was to be held. At the rally, one speaker talked of storming the gates of Hell. Bishop Harry Jackson finished his remarks by leading the crowd in a chant he has used at anti-gay rallies: “Let God arise and his enemies be scattered!”

Jindal Unplugged, Unhinged, and Unapologetic

Jindal seems to have decided that his best chance in a crowded Republican field is to plant himself at the far right of an already far-right group. In the days leading up to the rally, he drew criticism for comments denigrating Muslims and for repeating bogus charges about Muslim “no-go zones” that Fox News had already apologized for spreading. During a radio interview a few days before the rally, Jindal said liberals pretend that jihadist terrorism isn’t happening and pretend “it’s a good thing to kill journalists, to kill teenagers for watching soccer, to kill over 150 schoolchildren, to treat women as second-class citizens…” He decried political incorrectness and multiculturalism and said of immigrants who do not embrace American exceptionalism, “that’s not immigration, that’s invasion.”

On “This Week” on Sunday, ABC’s George Stephanopoulos noted that Jindal had declared at his prayer rally that “on the last page, our God wins,” and asked him if that was appropriate in a religiously diverse country. Jindal praised religious liberty but ducked the question.

On the same show, Jindal said he would back a push for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to allow states to discriminate against same-sex couples, all while saying “I am not for discrimination against anybody.” (Jindal describes himself as an “evangelical Catholic,” and his contradictory rhetoric parallels the language of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which says it opposes “unjust discrimination” against gay people, but defines the term “unjust discrimination” in a way that applies only to those people with “same-sex attraction” who remain celibate.)

Jindal has also promoted far-right policies as governor. As Brian has noted:

Jindal has reached out to the party’s increasingly extreme base by undermining the teaching of evolution in public schools; promoting wild conspiracy theories about Common Core, an effort to adjust school standards that he supported before it became the target of the Tea Party’s fury; and hyping the purported persecution of Christians in America, specifically citing the plight of Christians with reality television shows.

Whose Agenda?

Jindal’s rally was not an original idea. In fact Jindal’s “Response” recycled materials and themes from a similar event that Texas Gov. Rick Perry held in 2011 to launch his presidential bid. Here’s what I wrote about Perry’s event, which applies equally well to Jindal’s – not surprising since both were organized by the same groups of extremists:

Organizers argued (unconvincingly) that "The Response" was about prayer, not politics. But groups like the American Family Association (AFA), which paid for the rally and its webcast…are not designed to win souls but to change American law and culture through grassroots organizing and political power-building. They have a corrosive effect on our political culture by promoting religious bigotry and anti-gay extremism, by claiming that the United States was meant to be a Christian nation, and by fostering resentment among conservative evangelicals with repeated false assertions that liberal elites are out to destroy religious liberty and silence conservative religious voices.

Jindal, of course, has the right to talk about his faith. But it is wrong for him to use his public office to proselytize and denigrate the faith of others. Teaming up with anti-gay extremists and Christian-nation advocates gives them credibility they do not deserve. His actions speak volumes about his judgment, values, and commitment to religious pluralism and equality under the law.

Bobby Jindal's Extremist Prayer Rally Brings Together Prophets, Bigots And Far-Right Activists

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who only a few years ago was lamenting the GOP’s decline into “the stupid party,” is now staking out a position on the party’s far-right fringe in preparation for an expected run for the presidency. Jindal has reached out to the party’s increasingly extreme base by undermining the teaching of evolution in public schools; promoting wild conspiracy theories about Common Core, an effort to adjust school standards that he supported before it became the target of the Tea Party’s fury; and hyping the purported persecution of Christians in America, specifically citing the plight of Christians with reality television shows.

Jindal, once hailed as the GOP’s top intellectual and reformer who denounced “dumbed-down conservatism” in an era of Tea Party populism, is slated to lead a prayer rally this weekend, “The Response: Baton Rouge,” organized and sponsored by some of the most extreme figures within the party.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry organized the original “Response” prayer gathering as a prelude to his 2012 presidential bid, allying with many of the same radical activists and organizations who are supporting Jindal’s version of the rally. While Perry’s campaign ultimately imploded, the people who helped put together his prayer rally credited it for various miracles. Jindal’s event has even recycled promotional materials from the Texas rally, including a “prayer guide” blaming marriage equality for Hurricane Katrina and the 2011 Joplin tornado.

“The Response” is being organized by David Lane, a Religious Right activist who boasts of his great influence and low profile, and various conservative pastors, including several who claim to be modern-day prophets and apostles, who all kicked off the prayer rally with an event at the Louisiana governor’s mansion earlier this month. The American Family Association, so notorious for its apoplectic anti-gay rhetoric and opposition to the freedoms of non-Christians that its chief spokesman earned a rebuke from Mitt Romney, is putting up the funding.

The organizers

David Lane, a self-styled “political operative” who gloats that he has “operated since 2005 largely under the radar” on behalf of conservative causes and Republican candidates, is serving as the organizational muscle behind Jindal’s prayer rally.

Jindal isn’t the only potential GOP candidate who is getting Lane’s help; Lane has also arranged various events focused on energizing conservative pastors in early GOP primary states that have featured appearances from potential presidential hopefuls Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Mike Huckabee. He also organized overseas tours with various conservative activists for likely candidates including Huckabee, Perry and Paul. Lane has also teamed up with the Republican National Committee, whose chairman, Reince Priebus, sings his praises.

Lane hopes to use “The Response” as a launching pad for his effort to recruit 1,000 pastors to run for elected office.

Lane, who has connections to the top of the Republican Party, has views which are far out of the mainstream. He has:

  • called on conservatives to attack Mitt Romney for worshiping “the false god of Mormonism”;
  • warned that LGBT rights are creating an unparalleled “crisis” leading to “our utter destruction” as a nation;
  • forecasted America’s destruction as a result of “the pagan onslaught imposing homosexual marriage” and “homosexual scouts”;
  • declared that “our long-term strategy must be to place the Bible in Public Schools as the principle [sic] textbook of American education”;
  • and predicted that “homosexuals praying at the Inauguration” in 2013 would lead to divine punishment in the form of “car bombs in Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Des Moines, Iowa.”

The American Family Association, classified as a “hate group” by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is providing the financial backbone for Jindal’s prayer rally, as it did for Perry’s 2011 event.

The group’s chief spokesman, Bryan Fischer, has won nationwide notoriety for his remarks about homosexuality and religious and ethnic minorities, which he shares on his daily program on the AFA’s radio network. Fischer has:

Other AFA officials have blamed gay people for natural disasters like Hurricane Isaacpromoted birther conspiracy theories and railed against secular Jews as threats to America.

The “apostles”

The latter half of Rick Perry’s “The Response” prayer rally was emceed by a self-proclaimed prophet who believes Oprah Winfrey is the harbinger of the Antichrist.

It looks like Jindal’s rally will be no different: Doug Stringer, who considers himself to be a modern-day apostle and who also worked on Perry’s rally, is spearheading the Louisiana event. Stringer has blamed American “[l]icentiousness or moral looseness to the degree that it is ‘in your face,’ including homosexuality,” for the September 11, 2001 attacks, which he described as a “wake-up call” from God.

Another self-proclaimed prophet, Cindy Jacobs, is also featured on “The Response: Baton Rouge” website. Jacobs has quite the prophetic record. She:

  • suggested that legal victories for marriage equality advocates led to Hurricane Sandy and other natural disasters;
  • proclaimed that Rick Perry’s “The Response” prayer rally “broke the curses on the land” of Texas brought on by “the Native American people [who] were cannibals and they ate people”;

Jim Garlow, a prominent “The Response: Baton Rouge” endorser who is involved in the “apostolic” movement, has been a leader of the movement against LGBT rights. Garlow has:

One event sponsor, Jennifer LeClaire, has used her column in Charisma News to broadcast several “prophetic” warnings about the evils of homosexuality and the “gay agenda” that is “working overtime to send millions to hell.” LeClaire has:

  • and claimed that gay people are possessed by a demonic “spirit of immorality” that “often enters in through some sort of abuse and the lies of the enemy [Satan] that follow.”

The activists

“The Response: Baton Rouge” has also featured endorsements from a slew of conservative politicians. Tamara Scott, as a member of the Republican National Committee representing Iowa and leader of the Iowa chapter of Concerned Women for America, is a key political player in the first-in-the-nation caucus state. But her political clout doesn’t hide her unbridled extremism. Scott has:

  • characterized young Central American immigrants as “highly trained warriors” who could “rise up against us as Americans”;
  • and suggested that Muslim-Americans are waging a “stealth jihad” to overthrow the U.S.

Another official “Response” endorser, longtime conservative activist and failed Republican nominee for lieutenant governor of Virginia E.W. Jackson, has pushed similarly radical views, particularly on gay rights, saying that “homosexuality is a horrible sin, it poisons culture, it destroys families, it destroys societies; it brings the judgment of God unlike very few things that we can think of.” He has also:

  • said of gay people: “Their minds are perverted, they’re frankly very sick people psychologically, mentally and emotionally”;
  • warned that homosexuality will bring about a “torrent of wickedness,” including human-animal marriages;

Gene Mills, leader of the Louisiana Family Forum and another key “Response” endorser, is a vocal ally of Jindal’s who helped push the governor’s policies undermining public education and promoting religious schooling. It’s no surprise that Mills leads the state’s foremost anti-LGBT group, as he has:

  • asserted that homosexuality is not a sexual orientation but a “disorder”;
  • falsely claimed that anti-gay speech is now classified as hate crimes;
  • said that abuse shelters should turn away transgender victims of spousal abuse;
  • and explained that anti-gay discrimination is a myth because “the reality is the shame and the guilt the homosexual feels is mistakenly reinterpreted as discrimination and what they attempt to do is to call it discrimination and prohibit it.”

Bobby Jindal Gets A Jump-Start On His Right-Wing Prayer Rally

In preparation for his upcoming "The Response" prayer rally, Gov. Bobby Jindal hosted a prayer meeting at the Louisiana governor's mansion last month with more than 70 local and national pastors. The participants included anti-gay activists like Jim Garlow and E.W. Jackson, as well secretive and influential Religious Right activist David Lane, whom Jindal can been seen praying with around the :30 mark in this piece produced by local reporter Rick Rowe:

Lane is actually the one orchestrating Jindal's entire prayer event, which is just part of his overarching agenda to ensure that America is run by Christians who share his extremist views. As such, Lane is also organizing an effort to recruit 1,000 pastors for run for political office.

Not surprisingly, Lane sees an opportunity to combine these efforts, which he is doing by calling upon pastors to attend Jindal's prayer rally and participate in the pastors' briefing on running for office the day before:

A month ago, I appealed for pastors to commit to pray for 30-45 days, in order to discern if the Lord is calling them to run for city council, county commissioner, school board, mayor or congress in 2016. By simple arithmetic, if the Lord called 1,000 pastors to run in 2016 and if they averaged 300 volunteers per campaign, then that would mean 300,000 ground-level evangelicals working within their local precincts. When my own pastor, Rob McCoy, ran for office this fall, he saw 625 volunteers join in his campaign. A similar grassroots evangelical movement—from coast-to-coast—would change America for good.

...

If we advance spiritual men and women into the public square-people who know wisdom, then we improve America's chances for remaining free. We trust in the Lord and we marshal the army ... Godly wisdom has inestimable superiority to military might and gold. A key to sustaining freedom is the launching of spiritual men and women from behind the pulpit and four walls of the church ... right on into City Hall.

...

If you feel called, then we hope to see you in Baton Rouge on Jan. 23, 2015. The Friday Pastors' Briefing will be called "Issachar: Training The Men and Women of Issachar."

Bobby Jindal Is Predictably Partnering With Anti-Gay Radicals For His Prayer Rally

When Texas Governor Rick Perry was gearing up to run for president the last time around, he decided to kick things off by headlining a large right-wing prayer rally organized by the American Family Association, an anti-gay hate group, and David Lane, a secretive Religious Right organizer and Christian nationalist, called The Response. But rather than propelling him into the White House, the event became infamous mostly for the scores of radical figures with whom Perry had chosen to align himself.

This time around, the AFA and Lane are organizing another Response prayer rally to be headlined by Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, and it seems to be operating from exactly the same playbook.

Over the weekend, organizers posted videos featuring several Religious Right activists urging conservative Christians to attend the event, including invitations from folks like Tamara Scott, Jennifer LeClaire, Jim Garlow, E.W. Jackson, and Cindy Jacobs:

On Friday, the AFA's Bryan Fischer also noted that he would be in attendance at the event and providing broadcast coverage, and there is quite possibly no other figure within the "mainstream" Religious Right movement today who can match him in terms of consistently unadulterated bigotry.

Gov. Jindal does not seem to have learned any lessons from the first Response rally and, if anything, remarkably seems quite intent on surrounding himself with the same group of radical Religious Right activists that made the last one so notorious.

Garlow: Force Gay Marriage Supporters To Live In Houses With Improper Plumbing

Earlier this week, Jim Garlow called in to the "Point Of View" radio program to discuss his participation in the Vatican's recent summit on marriage. During the course of the conversation, Garlow offered up a rather interesting argument against the acceptance of gay marriage.

"All the people who advocate for so-called same-sex marriage ought to have to live in homes in which the plumbers who built them, or the electricians who built them, didn't understand the difference between the male and female end of piping or plumbing or of electrical as well," he said, "and see how that home works out for them."

"It doesn't work," he concluded:

Jim Garlow: Religious 'Onslaught' Needed To Fight 'Demonic' Gay Marriage

Anti-gay activists Tony Perkins and Jim Garlow, who are attending the Vatican summit on marriage this week, spoke yesterday about how the conference could create a new, ecumenical movement to combat what Garlow called the “demonic movement to destroy marriage.”

“The attack on marriage is global,” Garlow told Perkins, who was broadcasting his “Washington Watch” program live from the Vatican. “I believe it’s clearly demonic.”

Garlow, the California pastor who helped orchestrate the Proposition 8 campaign, then called for “an onslaught of people who come together of very different values” to defend marriage from Satan, repeating his frequent refrain that if he were Satan he would “want to destroy marriage” by allowing gay couples to wed.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 9/15/14

  • Jim Garlow has organized something called "The Jefferson Gathering" on Capitol Hill, in which Religious Right activists like Jonathan Cahn are brought in to speak to members of Congress and lead them in prayer.
  • Watching Glenn Beck struggle to come up with a coherent conspiracy theory to explain why President Obama uses the term "ISIL" rather than "ISIS" is rather entertaining.
  • Lee Duigon explains that liberals are unhappy because "Satan is unhappy": "When the devil is angry and unhappy, his servants are angry and unhappy."
  • Bryan Fischer is worried that Adrian Peterson's indictment on charges of child abuse will give corporal punishment a bad name, which shouldn't happen because its use is commanded by God.
  • Finally, "Coach" Dave Daubenmire is no conspiracy theorist, but contrails are nefarious and "something is being sprayed on us!"

Jim Garlow: Joan Rivers Going To Hell For Her 'Potty Mouth'

Religious Right pastor Jim Garlow writes today in WorldNetDaily that he is sick and tired of hearing people on TV “who are known for their willfully sinful and ‘degeneres’ practices” praise the late comedian Joan Rivers, when in fact they should be worried she is doomed to Hell because of her “degrading” and “mean” sense of humor.

In fact, Garlow knows that Rivers is bound for Hell unless she apologized for her “potty mouth.”

On TV, I have listened to the comments about her life from people who, among other things, have been married five times, are equally foulmouthed and some who are known for their willfully sinful and “degeneres” practices.

During these moments, my reflections are different, as I come from a different “kingdom.” May I respectfully appeal to scriptural truth, as opposed to the idolizing of practices that are dishonoring to God? Going against the extolling crowd, may I have permission to be contrarian?

I sincerely hope Joan Rivers repented in her final hours. All of us must repent for sin in our lives, if we are to enter into God’s glorious heaven. Without that spirit of repentance before God, along with heartfelt contrition, another place awaits us – you remember, that other place that no one ever wants to mention.



Authentically skillful comedians do not have to have a “potty mouth.” We try to teach young children to have more class than that. Comedians should be held to a higher standard.

Every child needs to be taught how to respect and how to respond to others. Debating each other’s ideas is healthy. In contrast, cutting personal attacks are not acceptable. Authentic and respectful “roasting” can be clever and truly humorous. However, degrading others is not “roasting.” It is mean. Joan Rivers – along with several other comedians – never learned the difference. The fact that they got by with it, and were paid millions of dollars to do it, does not justify it.



So the so-called “experts” are on all the TV shows talking about Rivers. One has been married five times. Another is so vile, his humor cannot be aired. Another champions immorality. They lift up Rivers’ “talent.” Yes, she was talented, but I say she abused it. And many were harmed by it.

I will be in the minority. The moral baseline has been moved so low that many Christians will be applauding her “contributions to life.” But that only shows the depth of their lack of the understanding of the holiness of God, before whom every one of us will stand someday. Once we face him, being the snide host of “Fashion Police” on E! – or for that matter, any of the hidden sins in our lives – will not be “funny.” It will be serious.

Jim Garlow: Same-Sex Marriages 'Violate' California Law 'Every Single Day'

California Religious Right leader Jim Garlow helped spearhead the campaign to pass Proposition 8, and doesn’t seem to be giving up on his effort to ban same-sex marriage in the state even after the anti-gay amendment was overturned by federal courts.

While speaking to Bryan Fischer yesterday, Garlow insisted that every same-sex marriage — or as he calls it, “so-called gay marriage” — is still a violation of the law.

He said that Proposition 8 “still appears in the [state] Constitution, though it is being violated every single day” by gay couples getting legally married in the state.

Jim Garlow: Obama 'Honors Radical Islam'

Jim Garlow accused President Obama yesterday of having a “devious” agenda to “honor those who have been enemies of freedom, enemies of truth and enemies of justice.”

In an interview with the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer, the California-based pastor and Religious Right leader went on to claim that the president “honors Islam and radical Islam” and promotes hostility to Israel. He then argued that “there is no such thing as a Palestinian people etymologically, that does not exist.”

Jim Garlow Prophetically Declares That God's Definition Of Marriage Will Rule The Land

Jim Garlow kicked off today's national March for Marriage with a prayer, asserting that no court or legislature can ever change God's definition of marriage as between one man and one woman and therefore repenting on behalf of America before issuing a prophetic declaration that "marriage shall rule within the land, one man, one woman marriage will be established in this nation in honor of who you are as Almighty God":

Jim Garlow Warns Marriage Equality Is 'The Destruction Of Our Nation, The Ultimate Nail In The Coffin'

Comparing the anti-gay movement to the fights against slavery and the Maccabees, right-wing pastor and Prop 8 organizer Jim Garlow appeared on “The Janet Mefferd Show” Friday to warn that “it’s going to be the loss of America if marriage goes down.”

“It’s going to be the destruction of our nation, the ultimate nail in the coffin,” Garlow said. “Marriage will survive ultimately, America will not.”

Garlow previously held President Obama personally responsible for “tip[ping] the scales in a destructive direction” with his endorsement of marriage equality.

Garlow: Obama's Support For Gay Marriage 'Tip[ped] The Scales In A Destructive Direction'

Jim Garlow was on AFA's "Today's Issues" program yesterday to discuss his recent statement that President Obama's will be known by future generations as the person responsible for "morally and economically destroying a wonderful experiment called America."

Garlow reiterated this belief while speaking with the AFA's Tim Wildmon as he asserted that Obama's support for marriage equality in 2012 "tip[ped] the scales in a destructive direction" and thus "future sociologists will be able to outline the incredible destructive force of the dissolution of marriage" as having accelerated as a result of Obama's contribution "towards an already destabilized family unit":

'Washington - A Man Of Prayer': Highlights From The Religious Right Prayer Event Inside The US Capitol

Last night, members of Congress and Religious Right activists gathered in Statuary Hall inside the US Capitol for an annual event called "Washington: A Man of Prayer" at which they honored George Washington by collectively praying that God would protect and defend the United States of America.

Hosted by Mike Huckabee, the two hour event featured a variety of elected leaders, such as Rep. Tim Huelskamp and Rep. Steve King, who spoke together from the podium. Huelskamp asserted that God is at the heart of America because there is a small chapel located literally in the very center of the continent in Kansas, while King proclaimed that America was established by God.

"When He moved the Founding Fathers around like men on a chessboard," King said, "it was preordained. He guided them." Asserting that both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were written with "divine guidance," King declared that, as such, Americans must be "very aware of how God brought forth this nation":

Among the other speakers at the event was Jonathan Cahn, author of "The Harbinger" which claims that 9/11 was God's judgment upon America and that rebuilding the Freedom Tower without properly humbling ourselves before God was an act of utter defiance.

During his remarks, Cahn made this same case, saying that America is calling good evil and evil good and passing "laws that war against the laws of the almighty" which is why this nation experienced the wrath of God at Ground Zero just as ancient Israel did:

Cahn was followed by Robert Jeffress, who asserted that while some issues such as taxes or immigration reform ought to be rightly debated by the government, other issues like abortion and gay marriage "are beyond debate, for the judge of the universe has already rendered his opinion":

Jim Garlow made a similar point during his remarks, saying that there is no way that this nation can expect God's blessings is abortion remains legal and gay marriage is accepted.

"Can we actually expect the blessing of God when we violate the ways of God?," Garlow asked. "He's God, we're not. We really need him!"

Right Wing Round-Up - 5/1/14

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Jim Garlow Posts Archive

Miranda Blue, Saturday 04/25/2015, 3:12pm
At today’s March for Marriage, Pastor Jim Garlow offered a lengthy explanation for why he believes marriage equality is wrong, asking the audience to repeat several Hebrew words found in Genesis before rearranging the letters to make the word “fire,” which of course proves that if you allow marriage equality you are going to Hell. “You mess with the definition of marriage, and you burn, you’re toast, you can’t win that one,” he said. This explanation is so obvious, he said, that if the Supreme Court rules in favor of marriage equality this year, it... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 04/23/2015, 1:02pm
James Dobson once again dedicated his daily radio program today to a discussion of the Supreme Court's upcoming gay marriage case with anti-gay activists Brian Brown, Maggie Gallagher, and Jim Garlow. Unlike previous programs in which Religious Right leaders bemoaned the string of calamities that will befall this nation if gay marriage is legalized, today's show had a rather more hopeful feel, as Garlow and Gallagher took solace in the idea that gay marriage will prove to be so utterly horrible for the country that eventually the American people will realize the error of their ways... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 02/25/2015, 5:31pm
Jim Garlow was a guest on Bryan Fischer's "Focal Point" radio program today to promote the upcoming "Future Conference" that Garlow will be hosting at his San Diego church. During the course of the conversation, the two men began discussing the effort being led by radical Christian nationalist David Lane to recruit 1,000 pastors to run for political office, which Garlow proclaimed was an absolute necessity because the true purpose of government is to function as "a minister of God." "If you live in a constitutional republic or a democracy, as we do,... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 02/04/2015, 6:32pm
ALIPAC declares that we are "seeing what is possibly one of the greatest scandals in American history emerge regarding the millions of illegal extra work visas Obama's shadow government apparatus has handed out!" Jim Garlow will be hosting Newt Gingrich and several other Religious Right and New Apostolic Reformation activists for a conference at his church in June. Similarly, Jan Markell will be hosting Robert Jeffress and former Rep. Michele Bachmann at a conference in October. Was Gov. Bobby Jindal's prayer rally the fulfillment of one of Cindy Jacobs'... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Monday 01/26/2015, 2:57pm
On Friday, the night before Gov. Bobby Jindal's "The Response" prayer rally, Rachel Maddow took a look at the "questionable characters" who were helping him organize and promote the event, prompting Jindal to send a statement to Maddow insisting that his rally would be "a prayer event, not a political rally." Participants in the rally, of course, did not particularly see it that way. In addition to a segment dedicated to praying for an end to legal abortion in America, several speakers noted how getting right-wing Christians elected to public office was key... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Monday 01/26/2015, 2:12pm
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal skipped an Iowa stage crowded with Republican presidential wannabes on Saturday so he could host a prayer rally on the campus of Louisiana State University. Jindal and others have mischaracterized objections to the rally, suggesting that its critics were somehow out to silence people of faith. So let’s be clear about the real issue: Bobby Jindal used the power and prestige of his office to promote an event backed by some of the nation’s most religiously divisive and stridently anti-gay activists. And in a bid to boost his own political future, he sent a... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 01/22/2015, 2:00pm
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who only a few years ago was lamenting the GOP’s decline into “the stupid party,” is now staking out a position on the party’s far-right fringe in preparation for an expected run for the presidency. Jindal has reached out to the party’s increasingly extreme base by undermining the teaching of evolution in public schools; promoting wild conspiracy theories about Common Core, an effort to adjust school standards that he supported before it became the target of the Tea Party’s fury; and hyping the purported persecution of... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 01/07/2015, 2:06pm
In preparation for his upcoming "The Response" prayer rally, Gov. Bobby Jindal hosted a prayer meeting at the Louisiana governor's mansion last month with more than 70 local and national pastors. The participants included anti-gay activists like Jim Garlow and E.W. Jackson, as well secretive and influential Religious Right activist David Lane, whom Jindal can been seen praying with around the :30 mark in this piece produced by local reporter Rick Rowe: Lane is actually the one orchestrating Jindal's entire prayer event, which is just part of his overarching agenda to... MORE >