Phil Robertson

Phil Robertson Offers To Baptize Trump On TV So 'We Would Know We Have God On Our Side'

In a speech to the Values Voter Summit on Saturday, reality TV star Phil Robertson recounted a meeting with Donald Trump in which he told the GOP presidential nominee that he would baptize him on camera to get “God on our side.”

“If you really want to see something wild, film it, Donald, film me baptizing you,” the Duck Dynasty patriarch recalled telling Trump. “The left-wingers will literally go crazy and the evangelicals will swarm you like a mighty thrall because then we would know we have God on our side.”

Robertson also told attendees to “read the Old Testament and see how many different people God worked through to accomplish His purpose.”

“Better a man who sticks his foot in his mouth every once in a while than a woman who pours out lies,” he said.

Phil Robertson Links Drug Addiction To Laws on 'Perversion' And Abortion Rights

In an interview with a West Virginia radio station yesterday, “Duck Dynasty” patriarch Phil Robertson linked drug addiction and other social ills to the country forgetting “the God of the Bible” and instituting legal abortion and “perversion.”

Brian Sexton, a host with WVHU in Huntington, asked Robertson what he had learned from ministering to drug addicts and other troubled souls.

Robertson connected these issues with the themes of an upcoming "documentary" he’s starring in, which is directed by now-Trump campaign chief Steven Bannon.

“The documentary is what happens to any empire or culture, nation, what happens to them when they forget the God of the Bible, the God of Creation,” he said. “You forget Him and what they do is they allow men to determine what’s right and wrong instead of God, they let men decide what’s good and evil instead of God, and they allow men to decide how much your life is worth. So once that happens, you start seeing these, like in America, these court cases. I mean we’ve legislated the murder of our own children, we’ve legislated perversion, and instead of vetting our thinking through the word of God, we just decided, no, well, we know more than God.

“And now we look around and we see what we have, we’ve confined God inside these structures, everybody’s got a different sign, you know, there’s a church on every street corner, and it became so splintered and divided and the government came along and made sure, they basically said keep Him in those church buildings but do not bring Him out in public education, they ran Him out of there, saying ‘don’t bring Him into the public square.’”

He added that he is now being criticized just for quoting “a few Bible verses,” just like Jesus.

Phil Robertson: Founders Didn't Want Government To Provide Louisiana Flood Aid

Phil Robertson, the “Duck Dynasty” patriarch who will be speaking alongside Donald Trump at the Values Voter Summit this weekend, offered his thoughts on natural disasters in an interview with a West Virginia radio station yesterday, explaining that the government shouldn’t be providing relief to people affected by the devastating flooding in Louisiana because everybody should just chill out, stop whining and move to higher ground.

Brian Sexton, who was hosting “ The Tom Roten Morning Show,” asked Robertson to discuss the flooding in his home state of Louisiana, which led Robertson to embark on an extended reflection on natural disasters and how everyone always gets “bent out of shape whether it doesn’t rain or if it does rain,” when the country’s founders thought you should just deal with it on your own:

Here’s my view of disasters, whether it be hurricanes, tornados, it just rains a lot. Everyone needs to take a deep breath and say—You know, I’ve noticed something. We bellyache when it doesn’t rain because we can’t grow anything and ‘It’s a drought, it’s a drought!’ We all bellyache and then cry out. Well, when it rains, starts raining and it rains too much so you have a flood, ‘It’s a flood, it’s a flood!’ and everyone gets all bent out of shape whether it doesn’t rain or if it does rain.

So everybody is saying, running around on planet earth, seemingly saying in America at least, if it just rained just right all the time we would be happy. Here’s the deal: When it rains a lot, it’s going to flood. And if it doesn’t rain too much you have a drought. Both of them are bones to be chewed.

But it’s my studied opinion, just from observing, our founders basically said, ‘When disasters come your way, it’s unfortunate, they do happen, but you can’t expect the United States government to start pouring in and coming down there.’

What everyone needs to realize is we need to love one another enough that when you or your neighbors when they flood, we call come together, we all start cooking some meals here, looking after one another. These things, it’s the way life is. I mean, we’re not going to have the perfect temperature and the perfect amount of rainfall. So my view is, when it floods here we just move all our stuff higher and higher up the hill and if it starts coming in the house, we move it up, up, up as far as we can and then if it comes right down to it, we’re going to find ourselves another hill higher than the one we were on.

After discussing how he always picks land with potential flooding in mind and so people should never have built homes near the Gulf of Mexico in the first place, Robertson concluded: “We bring a lot of this stuff on ourselves. I don’t think the government ought to be a part of it. That’s when you ought to come together as human beings, love one another, help each other out. The waters will recede and life will go on, so let’s just keep it in proper context. It’s the way life is.”

Donald Trump's Extremist Allies: Who's Who At The Values Voter Summit 2016

Donald Trump is slated to join conservative activists and a number of GOP elected officials at next weekend’s Values Voter Summit, the annual Washington, D.C., event sponsored by the Family Research Council.

The GOP nominee has been busy recruiting Religious Right leaders, often while waving the Bible in the air and boasting about his plans to appoint conservative jurists to the bench and end the “War on Christmas.”

The activists joining Trump at the Values Voter Summit are some of the country’s most extreme opponents of LGBT rights, vocal conspiracy theorists and outspoken critics of the separation of church and state:

Tony Perkins

As the president of the Family Research Council, the summit’s main sponsor, Tony Perkins heads the organization’s efforts to erode gay rights, reproductive rights and the separation of church and state.

Perkins himself frequently reflects the extreme views of his organization. He has:

  • Warned that LGBT rights advocates will launch a holocaust against Christians, placing those who oppose same-sex marriage into “boxcars.”
  • Denied that there is a correlation between anti-gay bullying and depression and suicide, saying instead that gay and lesbian teens know they are “abnormal” and therefore “have a higher propensity to depression or suicide because of that internal conflict.
  • Warned that lawmakers who voted to repeal the military ban on openly gay service members would have “the blood of innocent soldiers on their hands.”
  • Predicted that marriage equality would “create a revolution” that would “break this country apart.” and lead to “the dissolution of the republic.”
  • Called Islam “evil.”
  • Said Obama is paving the way for the Antichrist.

Jerry Boykin

Family Research Council vice president and retired Army Lt. Gen. William “Jerry” Boykin sparked a controversy when, as a high-ranking official in the Bush Defense Department, he framed the fight against terrorism as a holy war between Christianity and Islam. He has since built a career as a Religious Right speaker, specializing in anti-Muslim rhetoric and anti-Obama conspiracy theories. He has:

  • Suggested that the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell led to the “absolute destruction” of our military.

Peter Sprigg

Peter Sprigg is a senior fellow for policy at the Family Research Council, where he supports policies including criminalizing homosexuality and exporting homosexuals. Sprigg:

  • Advocated for gay relationships to be outlawed and met with “criminal sanctions,” calling homosexuality “objectively harmful to the people who engage in it and to society at large.”
  • Defended Uganda when it sought to make homosexuality a crime warranting long jail sentences and in some instances the death penalty, saying that Uganda was under attack from those trying to force the “homosexual agenda down the throats of other countries.”
  • Insisted that homosexuality can “go away” once “the underlying psychological problems are addressed.”

James Dobson

James Dobson is the founder of the Family Research Council and Focus on the Family and currently hosts the “Family Talk” radio program. Recently, he signed on to advise Trump as part of the GOP nominee’s Evangelical Executive Advisory Board. Dobson:

  • Alleged that Obamacare would deprive the elderly of life-saving treatments.
  • Insisted that bisexuality means “orgies.”

Todd Starnes

Fox News commentator Todd Starnes has become notorious for filing false reports based on right-wing conspiracy theories, especially about the supposed persecution of Christians in America, which of course makes him a favorite “journalist” among conservative activists. Starnes has also:

  • Speculated that public school officials oppose abstinence-only programs in order to protect their “condom profits” from the “free condoms” they distribute.
  • Asserted that Obama refuses to take action against ISIS because he wants to “accommodate the Islamic faith at the expense of all other faiths.”
  • Blamed Obama for “orchestrating” the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, in an effort to exacerbate racial tensions.
  • Baselessly accused the University of Wisconsin of intentionally inflating grades to boost the academic performance of minority students.
  • Said that defeats for anti-gay activists are a sign of “the end of days.”
  • Compared officials who back the removal of Confederate symbols from government property to ISIS terrorists.

Phil Robertson

“Duck Commander” Phil Robertson and his family were already reality TV celebrities when they were launched into a new role as right-wing activists after Robertson made racist and homophobic comments in a 2013 magazine interview. Since then, Robertson has appeared at Republican events and in campaign ads, including one for Ted Cruz, and he is now starring in a “Christian war film” called “Torchbearer,” directed by Trump campaign CEO Steven Bannon. Robertson has:

  • Claimed black people during Jim Crow were not mistreated but were “singing and happy.”
  • Described marriage equality as “wicked” and “evil” and said of its supporters: “We have to rid the earth of them.”
  • Suggested that AIDS is God’s “penalty” for “immoral conduct.”
  • Attacked secular government as Satanism.

David and Jason Benham

Twin brothers Jason and David Benham were catapulted to national attention when an HGTV show that they were set to star in was canceled following revelations about their anti-gay, anti-choice, anti-Muslim activism. Since the show’s cancellation, the brothers have become martyrs in the eyes of the Religious Right, which has lifted them up as an example of the supposed persecution of conservative Christians in America. One or both of the brothers have:

  • Urged the city of Charlotte, North Carolina, to deny permits to an LGBT Pride event, calling it a “vile” and “destructive” activity that “should not be allowed in our city.”
  • Called an Islamic community center a “den of iniquity” and referred to Muslims as “the enemy attacking" America.
  • Organized a prayer rally to coincide with the 2012 Democratic National Convention, declaring that America must repent for “homosexuality and its agenda that is attacking the nation.”
  • Led protests outside of abortion clinics, praising anti-choice demonstrators for taking a stand at “the gates of hell” and confronting the “altars of Moloch.”

William Federer

William Federer is a conservative author, columnist and media commentator who focuses on the role of Christianity in American history. He has been embraced by many Republican leaders such as Ben Carson, who plagiarized from Federer’s writings without attribution. Federer has:

Michele Bachmann

While she is no longer a member of Congress, having retired in the midst of a campaign finance scandal, Michele Bachmann has continued to be a vocal conservative activist and End Times forecaster. Bachmann, who recently became a member of Donald Trump’s Evangelical Executive Advisory Board, has:

Allen West

Former congressman Allen West has remained active in conservative politics since losing his re-election bid in 2012, joining Fox News as a contributor and becoming executive director of the National Center for Policy Analysis. West has:

  • Demanded that Khizr Khan seek God’s forgiveness for his “stunt” at the Democratic National Convention.
  • Said feminists were making men “subservient” and denounced the “women that have been neutering American men and bringing us to the point of this incredible weakness.”
  • Wondered if Obama was waging “biological warfare” against Americans through enterovirus D68 or the Ebola virus.

Star Parker

Star Parker is a longtime Religious Right activist who is particularly active in anti-gay and anti-choice advocacy. She has called legal abortion a “genocide” on par with slavery and the Holocaust and blamed “sexual promiscuity” for nearly all financial and societal problems. At previous Values Voter Summits, she claimed that God was getting ready to punish America for marriage equality and legal abortion, urged gay people to “keep it private” and lamented that “homosexuality is now dividing us and bringing horrible hostility into the public square.” Parker has also:

  • Said LGBT-inclusive rules in schools amount to the “molestation” of children.
  • Tied same-sex marriage to failing public schools.
  • Mused that family life for African Americans was “more healthy” under slavery than it is today.
  • Referred to the Congressional Black Caucus as “the overseer today” that wants to torture black people and keep them “uneducated” and “on the plantation.”

Elaine Donnelly

A veteran of social conservative campaigns such as the successful effort to defeat the Equal Rights Amendment, Elaine Donnelly of the Center for Military Readiness is an outspoken critic of attempts to include LGBT people and women in the military. She has:

  • Criticized a Pentagon office focusing on preventing sexual harassment, saying it would become the “Office of Male Bashing.”
  • Insisted that the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell “could put remaining troops in greater danger, and break the All-Volunteer Force.”
  • Called on the military to ban same-sex wedding ceremonies on bases.

Kirk Cameron

Actor Kirk Cameron has emerged as a favorite on the Religious Right speaker circuit, where he publicizes his movies about the War on Christmas and preaches about how he is persecuted for being conservative. Cameron also styles himself as a historian, although he is not very good at it. He has:

  • Made a film about how bananas disprove the theory of evolution.
  • Said of homosexuality: “I think it's unnatural, I think it’s detrimental and ultimately destructive to so many foundations of civilization.”
  • Urged voters to oppose Obama in order to “hold back the flood of moral and spiritual evil that has been pouring into the country.”

Phil Robertson Threatens To Run For President

Last week, My Faith Votes, the Religious Right effort overseen by Ben Carson that seeks to mobilize 25 million Christians to vote in 2016, hosted a teleforum with Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson, during which he threatened to run for president.

Given that My Faith Votes was behind the meeting that Donald Trump held with hundreds of Religious Right leaders back in June, it was no surprise that most of the focus of the call was on encouraging Christian voters to support Trump.

Robertson kicked things off by agreeing with a caller who said that "rising secularism" in the United States is "the greatest assault on Christianity" in modern times. This assault, Robertson said, is the fault of the voters who "elect depraved souls" to serve in public office instead of candidates who will defend religious liberty and the Second Amendment and oppose abortion rights and gay marriage.

"You call it secularism," he said, "I just call it the Evil One, the Evil One that controls human beings."

Robertson went on to claim that society is overrun with murder and lying, which are the works of Satan and the result of the teaching of evolution and the separation of church and state in public schools.

The only hope is for Christians to vote for the godliest candidate, Robertson said. "The one that at least won't disarm us, spiritually speaking and physically speaking."

"I can't tell you how to vote," he said, but "if they keep fooling around long enough, they're going to force me to run. If you want to see a change in America, get me in there, dude, and there will be a big change then, if you all are ready for it."

Citizens United & Breitbart Debut New 'Christian War Film' At RNC

Right-wing moviemaking has been a growth industry in recent years, as conservative activists set out to challenge what they see as the damaging cultural impact of liberalism’s dominance in Hollywood. The latest example is “Torchbearer,” which director Steve Bannon called “a Christian war film” in remarks before a screening in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention last week.

“Torchbearer” stars Phil Robertson, the Duck Dynasty patriarch who became a folk hero in the right-wing war on “political correctness” when the show was temporarily suspended by A&E amid controversy over Robertson's inflammatory remarks about homosexuality and black people in the pre-civil-rights-movement Louisiana. The movie was shown to distributors in Cannes and will be released in theaters in August.

The hour-long film is a collaboration between well-known right-wing groups. Bannon is executive chairman of Breitbart News; the script was written by a Breitbart editor, Rebecca Mansour. It was produced by Citizens United, the organization whose movie attacking Hillary Clinton was used by conservatives on the Supreme Court to gut regulation of political money in Citizens United the court ruling. Religious Right political operative Ralph Reed attended the premiere, and at a reception following the screening, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., took the opportunity to slam Clinton and praise the work of Citizens United.

The idea for “Torchbearer” came from Robertson’s nephew Zach Dasher, who ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 2014. The plan began to gel during conversations at the 2015 Conservative Political Action Conference, at which Robertson was honored with the Andrew Breitbart Award. The film includes a clip from Robertson’s CPAC speech warning about sexually transmitted diseases.

Dasher introduced other pre-movie speakers, calling Citizens United’s David Bossie “Hillary Clinton’s worst nightmare” and celebrating that “Breitbart is waging war on liberalism in America.” Bossie said “Torchbearer” is the sixth collaboration between Citizens United and Bannon.

Dasher said he didn’t want to make a “typical cheesy Christian film.” Judging by that standard, you would have to say the movie succeeds. But it is hard to imagine anyone, even people who share Robertson’s evangelical faith and political beliefs, could enjoy the film very far beyond the opening sequences, which intersperse shots of Robertson calmly boating, fishing and hunting with sneering critics calling him bigoted and stupid, clearly meant to set up the narrator as a common-man hero despised by the cultural elites.

The film combines Robertson presenting an evangelical message of salvation through Jesus Christ with a theory about religion’s role in human history and society. Says Robertson, “When you take out God as the anchor of your civilization you open the door to tyranny and instead of human rights you have the will to power of the ruler who makes himself the sole determiner of what is true and just. Might makes right.”

More specifically, it is a warning to Americans that societies not grounded in reverence and fear for the Judeo-Christian God, and His teachings on right and wrong, inevitably descend into depravity and brutality.

Robertson says the Scopes trial on the teaching of evolution, during which H.L. Mencken mocked religious opponents of teaching evolution in schools, was “a watershed event that would slowly unravel the bond that wove the Creator into the very fabric of American life. God would be cast out of the public square, out of education, out of national discourse, out of the popular culture altogether.”

It is hard to describe how disturbing this movie is, on multiple levels.

Firstly, it visually and emotionally assaults the viewer by lingering on gruesome images of violence and death, using reenactments and animation as well as the most graphic historical footage from Auschwitz and more recent images of victims of ISIS and Boko Haram being beaten, shot and burned to death. I would call the movie’s infliction of trauma gratuitous, but it seems a very purposeful act meant to provoke and inflame and generate a rage to war.

Also jarring are the vast leaps through time and the excising of inconvenient truths that would undermine the moviemakers’ message, which seems to be that the history of the last 2015 years is a story of barbarity inflicted on Christians and others by those who have abandoned God or worship the wrong God or gods.

The movie’s timeline starts in the Garden of Eden, with Adam and Eve inviting evil into the world with their disobedience of God. Then we’re in Athens to talk about Aristotle’s belief in a “first cause” and four centuries later the apostle Paul’s trip there; then to Rome for the execution of Peter and Paul, the emperor Nero’s brutal massacres of Christians, and the Roman empire’s continued persecution of Christians over their refusal to adhere to the “civic religion” (dog-whistle alert) of the time, which required treating the emperor as a god.

From there, we hop to the pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock, conveniently skipping over a millennium-plus of history that includes abundant butchery carried out by people and societies fervent in their religious beliefs, particularly European Christians in wars against heretics and each other and during the conquest of the Americas.

Then it’s a short hop to the American Revolution. Robertson contrasts the American founders’ reverence for God with the atheistic French Revolution and Robespierre’s bloody reign of terror. The movie does not address the American Civil War, in which God-fearing Christians on both sides engaged in bloody combat.

At the turn of the 20th century, Robertson says, “worship of science becomes the new religion.” The film includes a segment on the development of the atomic bomb, “the first weapon of mass destruction.” It features a clip of nuclear scientist Robert Oppenheimer reciting language from the Hindu Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds.” Robertson responds, “So fallen man, unanchored by God, uses the power of creation to destroy. Mechanized war is upon us.”

It is not entirely clear how this segment fits the movie’s thesis that without the Judeo-Christian God as an anchor, there is no protection for human rights and human dignity. Are the filmmakers suggesting that Franklin Delano Roosevelt — whose public prayers for the D-Day invasion are cited admiringly in the film — was “unanchored by God” and was wrong to back development of the atomic bomb in fierce competition with Nazi scientists?

Speaking of Nazis, the movie devotes significant time to Auschwitz, where Robertson talks at length about the details of the horrific, systematized mass murder that took place there, which he blames in part on philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche’s claim that God is dead.

To be sure, the Holocaust is a brutal historical reality that should continue to be examined and understood as a warning about the way evil can be fostered and carried out at a national level, something that has been on many people’s minds during this political season. But this movie’s use of the stories and images of the people murdered at Auschwitz feels shamefully exploitative, especially in light of the fact that the film contains not a word about the long history of Christian anti-Semitism. Acknowledging centuries of deadly violence against Jews by Christians and in the name of Christianity would, again, undermine or at least complicate the movie’s central claim, and so it is simply ignored.

The same could be said of the film’s use of the civil rights era in the United States. The movie shows footage of the brutality meted out against those who were peacefully protesting segregation, but portrays this as another example of what happens when societies have rejected God and the weak and powerless are vulnerable to the man “with the biggest stick.”

But the big-stick brutality of Jim Crow and the official violence that enforced it were not being waged by a people who had rejected God. They were carried out by people who declared themselves to be acting in His name. Robertson himself has said that black people were more “godly” and “happy” under Jim Crow.

The movie quotes Martin Luther King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail as an example of religious faith in the service of public righteousness. But it utterly neglects how much slavery and Jim Crow were also justified by religious arguments, and how intensely the civil rights movement was seen by many white Christian leaders in the south as an attack on their faith as well as their culture. The late Rev. Jerry Falwell Sr., whose son had a prominent speaking role at the RNC, preached that the Supreme Court justices who ruled against segregated schools were not heeding God’s word.

Moving to the present era, Robertson warns against poll-driven morality – a not-too-subtle reference to growing support for LGBT people – and says a “sentimental need to be nice to each other” is not enough to ward off barbarism. Warning that “sentimentalism falls prey to nihilism,” Robertson says of the Hippies, “what started out as free love and flowers in your hair ended up with the Manson murders.” The movie includes footage of abortion activists’ anti-Planned Parenthood “sting” videos as well as American pop stars in sensual performances. “We are crotch-driven animals following our instincts,” he complains. “The sexual experience is now the high summit of our happiness.”

As the movie nears an end, viewers are subjected to graphic images of brutality and genocide being carried out by ISIS and affiliated terrorist groups like Boko Haram in Nigeria; Robertson reads from the biblical Book of Revelation.

And then there’s an abrupt shift back into the bayou made famous by Robertson and his family. Robertson wades into the water, where one at a time, people walk out to join him and be baptized. It is strikingly peaceful end to a “war movie.” Even if one is not tempted to join the line of people being baptized by Robertson, the idea of a soothing dip is very appealing after being subjected to “Torchbearer.”

 

Phil Robertson: If Donald Trump Loses, I'll Go Into Hiding

Today on “Breitbart News Daily,” reality TV star and conservative activist Phil Robertson spoke with radio host Stephen Bannon and Citizens United president David Bossie about the Republican National Convention, and Robertson urged listeners to rally behind Donald Trump.

The Duck Dynasty patriarch said that evangelicals must turn out and vote because they are facing “spiritual warfare” from “the depraved bunch, this political correct crowd” that is “of the Evil One.”

Robertson, an early supporter of Ted Cruz, said that Trump’s former rivals, including Cruz, must rally behind the business mogul, warning that “the alternative” to a Trump presidency is “depravity” and “moral bankruptcy.”

After falsely claiming that Democratic delegates “booed God” at their 2012 convention, Robertson said that a Democratic victory in November would cause him to go into hiding: “If the Republicans and the evangelicals do not get off their posteriors and vote, I think I’m going to head back to the woods and hide out.”

Phil Robertson On Abortion, ISIS And His Dream Of Being Donald Trump's Spiritual Advisor

Religious Right activist and Colorado state lawmaker Gordon Klingenschmitt had a chance to interview Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson at the Western Conservative Summit held in Denver earlier this month. On a recent episode of his "Pray In Jesus Name" program, Klingenschmitt sat down with Robertson, who shared his wisdom on the tie between legal abortion and ISIS and revealed his fantasy that Donald Trump will turn to Christ with the help of his spiritual advisor, Phil Robertson.

Robertson kicked things off by warning that the world is descending into lawlessness, which can all be linked back to the legalization of abortion.

"We've killed 60 million of our own children," he said. "ISIS is saying to us, 'Well, if you didn't think your own children were worth anything, why do you think we're worried about what your life is worth? We don't think you're worth anything, that's why we're killing you. Just like you kill your children, that's why we kill you. We don't think you're worth anything.'"

"If we could have stood there and told them, 'No, to us life is precious,'" Robertson said, then things would be different, but sadly "we lost the moral high ground."

Later, Robertson said that he would be voting for Donald Trump in November only because he doesn't like Hillary Clinton and hopes that Trump will be better. 

Ideally, Robertson said, "we convert Mr. Trump" to Christianity so that all of his past scandals and indiscretions that will be brought up during the campaign will be rendered moot because he has been born again.

"If he but be born again, he could then tell them, 'That's the old me, I've been born again, this is the new Donald Trump,'" Robertson said, envisioning a cabinet meeting where he would be introduced to the world as President Trump's spiritual advisor.

"Now, that would send a shock wave through America," he said. "The left-wingers would be jumping out of buildings."

Right Wing Round-Up - 7/5/16

Phil Robertson: God May Punish America As We 'Priss Around And Parade Our Perversion'

Phil Robertson, controversial patriarch of the “Duck Dynasty” family, joined Breitbart’s Stephen K. Bannon on his radio program this morning to discuss a new documentary that Bannon directed exploring Robertson’s views on everything from the Holocaust to Kim Kardashian West.

Robertson told Bannon that he hopes the movie will “change the hearts of some people” since the United States is “swimming in a sea of depravity” and risks the wrath of God.

“Depravity has become mainstream,” he said. “Murder is mainstream, we slaughter our own children, we priss around and parade our perversion. It’s being done in front of our very eyes. I mean, depravity, literally, and I never thought I’d see it in my lifetime, but it has literally become mainstream.”

Citing a quote from Thomas Jefferson, Robertson warned, “His wrath is coming.”

Robertson, who endorsed Ted Cruz for president, said that he wasn’t yet sure about Donald Trump but that he was sure that a Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders presidency would lead us “further down into the abyss.”

“So basically I’m calling the United States of America, beginning with the government, they need to just repent, turn back to God and heed the warnings of our founding fathers,” he said. “I think there is a chance. I don’t think there will be a chance with people like Hillary Clinton on the other side or Bernie Sanders. We just go further down into the abyss. But I don’t know about Donald Trump, he seems to be the one that the people have elected.”

Right Wing Round-Up - 4/11/16

Ted Cruz: Phil Robertson 'Terrifies' People Because He 'Speaks With Joy'

In his final campaign push before the South Carolina Republican presidential primary on Saturday, Sen. Ted Cruz once again trotted out Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson, showering the controversial reality TV star with praise.

Robertson dedicated his speech at the Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, campaign event to ranting about the evils of premarital sex and how men need to marry a “clean” woman.

Cruz, in turn, joked that Robertson could serve as ambassador to the United Nations in his administration and praised the activist for his overwhelming “joy.”

“You know, there’s a reason he terrifies the mainstream media,” Cruz said. “He says the things you’re not supposed to say. He actually remembers who we are as Americans and just speaks it with a joy, not with an anger, not with a hatred, with a joy in who we are.”

Let’s go over some of the joyful things Robertson has had to say, shall we?

Robertson wants to “rid the earth” of those who support “evil” and “wicked” marriage equality, warning that the acceptance of gay people will lead to bestiality. He has denounced liberals as the pawns of Satan and said that black people were “happy” until the end of Jim Crow got them hooked on welfare. And who could forget his very joyful speculation about how an atheist man would react to watching his wife and children get brutally raped and murdered?

Very joyful and not terrifying at all.

Phil Robertson: 'Rid The Earth Of' Gay Marriage Supporters

While stumping in Iowa for Ted Cruz on Sunday, “Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson declared that gay marriage is a sign of growing “depravity” and “perversion” in America.

Robertson, notorious for his racist and anti-gay remarks, said of marriage equality: “It is evil, it’s wicked, it’s sinful and they want us to swallow it.”

“We have to run this bunch out of Washington D.C.,” Robertson said. “We have to rid the earth of them. Get them out of there.”

Cruz followed Robertson on stage, calling the reality TV star “a joyful, cheerful, unapologetic voice of truth.”

In an interview with Fox News, also on Sunday, Robertson said that Ted Cruz “loves James Madison,” whom he claimed said that the U.S. is based “on the capacity of each of ourselves to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves based on the Ten Commandments of God.”

Robertson may want to brush up on his history, as the “Ten Commandments” quote he cites is actually fake.

The myth-busting website Snopes points out that “this statement appears nowhere in the writings or recorded utterances of James Madison and is completely contradictory to his character as a strong proponent of the separation of church and state.”

“We did not find anything in our files remotely like the sentiment expressed in the extract you sent us,” the curators of the Madison Papers at the University of Virginia told Americans United for Separation of Church and State when they looked into the fake quote in 2013. “In addition, the idea is inconsistent with everything we know about Madison's views on religion and government, views which he expressed time and time again in public and in private.”

Ted Cruz Touts Endorsement Of Extremist Phil Robertson Of 'Duck Dynasty'

Ted Cruz is out with a new ad today featuring reality TV star Phil Robertson, including footage of the two hunting together.

The “Duck Dynasty” patriarch turned into a conservative hero when he made a series of racist and anti-gay statements in an interview with GQ magazine, causing A&E to briefly suspend him from his family’s show on the network.

Robertson told GQ that black people were better off under Jim Crow — “singing and happy,” “pre-entitlement, pre-welfare” — than they are today. He also likened gay people to people who have sex with animals, saying that gay people’s minds must be warped by sin, because how else would they not be attracted to vaginas.

This controversy helped launch Robertson’s career in the conservative speaking circuit, where he went on to attack transgender and gay people; falsely claim that “110 million Americans now have a sexually transmitted illness,” which he blamed on hippies; blame Nazism on the lack of Christianity in Germany; and lay out his plans to fight ISIS: “Either convert them or kill them.”

In one speech, Robertson fantasized about an atheist family being brutally raped, dismembered and murdered in order to prove a point about how Americans need to follow God’s laws.

Robertson also believes that liberals in the U.S. are pawns of Satan who are worse than the Nazis because “they champion perversion, they champion murder, aborting their children and they are champions of lies.”

And now he is just one of the many far-right extremists whose endorsement has been welcomed by Cruz’s presidential campaign.

The Gay 'Jihad,' The Charleston 'Accident' And The 10 Worst Right-Wing Moments of 2015

Here at Right Wing Watch, we listen to hours of video and audio each day in order to find the short clips that we share with our readers. It’s been a doozy of a year, in which presidential politics has collided with the farthest of the far right, and here at Right Wing Watch, we’ve had the dubious pleasure of witnessing it all. It’s hard to pick our favorite/most horrifying memories of the year, so instead we’ve looked back at the 10 most watched videos and most listened-to audio clips of the year.

10. Sandy Rios Investigates The Amtrak Crash

Days after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia in May, killing eight and injuring hundreds, the American Family Association’s Sandy Rios pointed out “an interesting part of the story” that was likely “a factor” in the crash: the conductor’s homosexuality.

9. ‘America, Repent Of Harry Potter!’

This was just one of the many bizarre and disturbing things to happen at last month’s National Religious Liberties Conference in Iowa, which was attended by three Republican presidential candidates .

8. The Gay Marriage ‘End Game’

June was not a happy month for anti-gay activists, as exemplified by Vision America’s Rick Scarborough, who days before the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision warned that gay marriage was a satanic plot to destroy Christianity and may very well bring God’s judgment on America.

7. ‘Light Wins’

You can imagine our delight when conservative activist Janet Porter announced that she had filmed a new anti-gay “documentary” featuring Republican presidential candidates and members of Congress alongside some of the most extreme anti-gay activists in the business.

The trailer was stunning:

And, in the end, the film did not disappoint.

6. Gay Wedding Etiquette

At the same conference at which he railed against Harry Potter, radical pastor Kevin Swanson offered his advice on what to do if your child is gay and getting married.

Reminder: Swanson organized the conference, which three Republican presidential candidates attended.

5. Pat Robertson Comforts the Bereaved

Televangelist Pat Robertson is not always quite on point with the advice he gives to viewers of “The 700 Club” at the end of every program, such as when he told a bereaved mother who had just lost a young child that the child could have turned out to be the next Hitler .

4. The Gay ‘Jihad’

Ted Cruz went there during a campaign event in Iowa in April.

3. Rick Perry’s ‘Accident’

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry had a very ill-timed “oops” moment when he called the mass shooting at a church in Charleston an “accident,” in the process of claiming that the crime was the result of drugs rather than guns.

2. Phil Robertson’s Imagination

Back in March, controversial “Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson tried to make a convoluted point about atheists supposedly having no moral code by telling a gruesome hypothetical story about a family of atheists getting raped and murdered.

1. Rick Scarborough’s Martyrdom

Nobody took the hysteria over the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision quite as far as Rick Scarborough, who declared a few days before the court handed down its decision that he was ready to burn to death in his fight against gay marriage.

Phil Robertson's Advice To Gay Men: Just Marry A Woman!

Duck Dynasty’s Phil Robertson caused quite a stir with comments that he made in GQ about how black people were happy during Jim Crow and how gay people are no different from people engaging in bestiality, adding that he doesn’t understand why they don’t find vaginas desirable.

During a Friday prayer breakfast speech in Vero Beach, Florida, Robertson offered some more advice to gay men: marry a woman.

After telling men who are “shacked up” with their girlfriends to get married and “have it, she’s yours then,” Robertson said men in same-sex relationships should simply “call the dude, find you a woman and marry her.” “You’re not in a trap you can’t get out of,” Robertson said. “Come on!”

Earlier in his remarks, he offered a twisted thought experiment about the murder of an atheist family and suggested that liberals are led by Satan.

Phil Robertson: Liberals Worse Than Nazis, Led By Satan

During a prayer rally speech last Friday in which he opined about an atheist family getting raped and murdered, Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson employed remarks similar to the speech he delivered at CPAC earlier this year about how Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, the Japanese Emperor in World War II and ISIS terrorists were all capable of killing scores of people because they didn’t believe in Jesus.

But in his Friday remarks, he added one more group to this list of violent, Satanic evildoers: liberals.

In fact, Robertson said that demon-possessed liberals in America have killed more than Stalin and Hitler, and he even found time to suggest that President Obama is among the liberals championing Satan’s lies in the U.S.:

I gave you four ideologies in the last one hundred years, I see a pattern. You say, ‘why do they do what they do, why is there always murder?’ You know what the scary thing is? The fifth ideology right in behind all of this bunch of stuff we’re dealing with now, has its roots in the United States of America? You know how many they’ve killed? You say, ‘who are they?’ People call them left-wing loons, Bill O’Reilly calls them, political correct crowd, orthodox liberal opinion. You say, ‘what are they famous for?’ They’ve killed 63 million of their own children. 63 million. More than Hitler, more than Stalin. We’re slaughtering ourselves. You say, ‘who is behind it?’ Their father is, he was a murderer, from the beginning, they are slaves to sin, they are controlled by the Evil One. Duh.

Any Jesus with them? No, no. They don’t want Biblical correctness, no siree, they will not touch this, they are trying to get around it, they want political correctness. Well, what is it? What is political correctness? Orthodox liberal opinion in matters of sexuality, race, gender. They’re arguing and debating is there a difference between a male and a female? I’m like, dude, go in the bathroom, take your clothes off and take a look, you’ll figure it out.

Satan was a murderer from the beginning not holding to the truth so there’s no truth in him, when he lies — am I dreaming? Have you ever heard this many lies coming out of Washington D.C. since you’ve been on the earth? Have you ever heard more? You say where in the world is it coming from? They champion perversion, they champion murder, aborting their children and they are champions of lies. I mean I’m listening to them and thinking, ‘dude, what?’

‘Yeah, this bunch here, they’re the kind that clings to their guns and their bibles,’ I’m thinking, yeah, we may need them. How in tarnation do you think we ran the Brits back to where they came from back there 240 years ago? It took guns and it took bibles, right? You better stay with what brought you. He was a murderer from the beginning, there’s no truth in him and when he lies he speaks his native language, the relationship between these guys and Satan. He is a liar and the Father of Lies.

Phil Robertson Hypothesizes About Atheist Family Getting Raped And Killed

On Friday, “Trunews” host Rick Wiles aired a speech that Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty delivered at the Vero Beach Prayer Breakfast earlier that day, in which Robertson offered gruesome details about how an atheist father would react to watching intruders behead his wife and rape and kill his two daughters while they also cut off his penis .... which would supposedly somehow prove a point about following God’s laws.

“I’ll make a bet with you,” Robertson said. “Two guys break into an atheist’s home. He has a little atheist wife and two little atheist daughters. Two guys break into his home and tie him up in a chair and gag him. And then they take his two daughters in front of him and rape both of them and then shoot them and they take his wife and then decapitate her head off in front of him. And then they can look at him and say, ‘Isn’t it great that I don’t have to worry about being judged? Isn’t it great that there’s nothing wrong with this? There’s no right or wrong, now is it dude?’”

Robertson kept going: “Then you take a sharp knife and take his manhood and hold it in front of him and say, ‘Wouldn’t it be something if this [sic] was something wrong with this? But you’re the one who says there is no God, there’s no right, there’s no wrong, so we’re just having fun. We’re sick in the head, have a nice day.’”

“If it happened to them,” Robertson continued, “they probably would say, ‘something about this just ain’t right.”

Phil Robertson Preaches To CPAC: STDs Are 'The Revenge Of The Hippies'

For some reason, organizer's of this year's CPAC conference decided to bestow a First Amendment award upon "Duck Dynasty's" Phil Robertson, apparently for no other reason than because he came under intense criticism for a series of offensive comments that he made about gays and African Americans and for which he refused to apologize.

Going well beyond his allotted time, Robertson treated the audience at CPAC to a rambling sermon about America's desperate need for God, which he illustrated in a variety of ways including, at one point, by railing about STDs.

"One hundred and ten million Americans now have a sexually transmitted illness," Robertson sighed. "There is a penalty to be paid for what the beatniks, who morphed into the hippies [did]. You say what do you call the hundred and ten million people who have sexually transmitted illnesses? It's the revenge of the hippies! Sex drugs and rock and roll have come back to haunt us."

The solution, of course, is one man and one woman marriage, Robertson said, as he thundered that the reason he is telling people this is "because I'm trying to help you, for crying out loud, America!"

Right Wing Round-Up - 2/17/15

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Phil Robertson Posts Archive

Brian Tashman, Monday 09/12/2016, 10:40am
In a speech to the Values Voter Summit on Saturday, reality TV star Phil Robertson recounted a meeting with Donald Trump in which he told the GOP presidential nominee that he would baptize him on camera to get “God on our side.” “If you really want to see something wild, film it, Donald, film me baptizing you,” the Duck Dynasty patriarch recalled telling Trump. “The left-wingers will literally go crazy and the evangelicals will swarm you like a mighty thrall because then we would know we have God on our side.” Robertson also told attendees to “... MORE >
Miranda Blue, Thursday 09/08/2016, 12:42pm
In an interview with a West Virginia radio station yesterday, “Duck Dynasty” patriarch Phil Robertson linked drug addiction and other social ills to the country forgetting “the God of the Bible” and instituting legal abortion and “perversion.” Brian Sexton, a host with WVHU in Huntington, asked Robertson what he had learned from ministering to drug addicts and other troubled souls. Robertson connected these issues with the themes of an upcoming "documentary" he’s starring in, which is directed by now-Trump campaign chief Steven Bannon.... MORE >
Miranda Blue, Thursday 09/08/2016, 12:04pm
Phil Robertson, the “Duck Dynasty” patriarch who will be speaking alongside Donald Trump at the Values Voter Summit this weekend, offered his thoughts on natural disasters in an interview with a West Virginia radio station yesterday, explaining that the government shouldn’t be providing relief to people affected by the devastating flooding in Louisiana because everybody should just chill out, stop whining and move to higher ground. Brian Sexton, who was hosting “ The Tom Roten Morning Show,” asked Robertson to discuss the flooding in his home state of Louisiana... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Friday 09/02/2016, 1:00pm
Donald Trump is slated to join conservative activists and a number of GOP elected officials at next weekend’s Values Voter Summit, the annual Washington, D.C., event sponsored by the Family Research Council. The GOP nominee has been busy recruiting Religious Right leaders, often while waving the Bible in the air and boasting about his plans to appoint conservative jurists to the bench and end the “War on Christmas.” The activists joining Trump at the Values Voter Summit are some of the country’s most extreme opponents of LGBT rights, vocal... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Tuesday 08/09/2016, 12:36pm
Last week, My Faith Votes, the Religious Right effort overseen by Ben Carson that seeks to mobilize 25 million Christians to vote in 2016, hosted a teleforum with Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson, during which he threatened to run for president. Given that My Faith Votes was behind the meeting that Donald Trump held with hundreds of Religious Right leaders back in June, it was no surprise that most of the focus of the call was on encouraging Christian voters to support Trump. Robertson kicked things off by agreeing with a caller who said that "rising secularism" in the United... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Monday 07/25/2016, 10:45am
Right-wing moviemaking has been a growth industry in recent years, as conservative activists set out to challenge what they see as the damaging cultural impact of liberalism’s dominance in Hollywood. The latest example is “Torchbearer,” which director Steve Bannon called “a Christian war film” in remarks before a screening in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention last week. “Torchbearer” stars Phil Robertson, the Duck Dynasty patriarch who became a folk hero in the right-wing war on “political correctness” when the show was... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 07/21/2016, 11:50am
Today on “Breitbart News Daily,” reality TV star and conservative activist Phil Robertson spoke with radio host Stephen Bannon and Citizens United president David Bossie about the Republican National Convention, and Robertson urged listeners to rally behind Donald Trump. The Duck Dynasty patriarch said that evangelicals must turn out and vote because they are facing “spiritual warfare” from “the depraved bunch, this political correct crowd” that is “of the Evil One.” Robertson, an early supporter of Ted Cruz, said that Trump’s former... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 07/14/2016, 11:30am
Religious Right activist and Colorado state lawmaker Gordon Klingenschmitt had a chance to interview Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson at the Western Conservative Summit held in Denver earlier this month. On a recent episode of his "Pray In Jesus Name" program, Klingenschmitt sat down with Robertson, who shared his wisdom on the tie between legal abortion and ISIS and revealed his fantasy that Donald Trump will turn to Christ with the help of his spiritual advisor, Phil Robertson. Robertson kicked things off by warning that the world is descending into lawlessness, which can all be... MORE >