Steve King

Steve King Is A Walking Late Night Joke

On his program on Monday night, comedian Jimmy Fallon reacted to Hillary Clinton’s comment that a number of Trump supporters fall into a “basket of deplorables” by joking, “So, if you're keeping track, Trump supporters are deplorable, and Hillary supporters are deportable.”

Fallon’s “deportable” remark could have been a reference to Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King’s characterization of Michelle Obama’s guest at last year’s State of the Union Address as “a deportable.” 

King, however, did not see any criticism in Fallon’s joke and instead was thrilled when Iowa talk radio host Jan Mickelson played him a clip of Fallon’s monologue in an interview yesterday.

“Did I say that or did he say that?” King asked, to which Mickelson replied: "Fallon is stealing your lines now.”

“Well, that’s okay,” King said, “I’m happy if he can just repeat them over and over again. I recall making a statement that the first lady invited a deportable in to sit next to her during the president’s State of the Union address and I can’t think of any way to undermine the rule of law any more effectively than to do that.”

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/14/16

Steve King: Colin Kaepernick Is Helping ISIS

In an interview today on Newsmax, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, denied that San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has a constitutional right to refuse to stand for the National Anthem, even going so far as to accuse him of sympathizing with the terrorist group ISIS.

“I understand that he has an Islamic girlfriend that is his fiancée and that this has changed him, has taken on some different political views along the way, this is activism that is sympathetic to ISIS,” he told host Steve Malzberg. “For me, if I’m the coach, I would say, ‘You’re done. Until you take a knee and beg forgiveness from the American people, you’re not going to set foot out on this field again.’”

The Religious Right Shares Trump's Putin Crush

One of the notable developments in right-wing-watching in recent years has been how enthusiastically many Religious Right leaders have embraced Russia’s anti-democratic president, former KGB official Vladimir Putin. It seems even more remarkable that the Republican Party’s presidential nominee has been lavishing praise on Putin even as Russia maneuvers to diminish America’s influence in the world.

As president, Putin has consolidated his power through attacks on the independent media, the persecution of political opponents, and restrictions on civil society. He has annexed Crimea, supported violent separatists in Ukraine, fostered anti-democratic right-wing forces in Europe, and made the weakening of NATO a major strategic imperative.

None of that has kept Donald Trump from praising Putin and welcoming Putin’s praise for him. In Wednesday night’s forum on national security issues, Trump said, “I think I would have a very, very good relationship with Putin. And I think I would have a very, very good relationship with Russia.” When asked about some of Putin’s troubling actions, Trump didn’t criticize the Russian president, suggesting instead that he could “start naming some of the things that President Obama does at the same time.”

Trump went on to praise Putin’s leadership and pooh-pooh concerns about Putin’s authoritarianism: “I mean, you can say, oh, isn’t that a terrible thing—the man has very strong control over a country.” Then on Thursday, Trump appeared on RT, a network operated by the Russian government, to slam American media and U.S. foreign policy and dismiss as “unlikely” the idea that the Russian government was involved in hacking the DNC’s email as American intelligence agencies believe.

Some conservatives have criticized Putin’s anti-democratic actions and strategic aims, and some Republicans were not happy about Trump’s recent remarks. But his running mate Mike Pence said it is “inarguable” that Putin is a stronger leader than President Obama. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa, a Trump supporter, told CNN that Putin is a better leader for Russia than President Obama has been for the U.S., praising the increase in “hyper-nationalism” in Russia. Conspiracy-theory-promoting radio host Alex Jones, whose “amazing” reputation Trump has praised while appearing on his show , has expressed his admiration for Putin’s promotion of homeschooling and “masculine men.”

Trump will find himself in friendly company at this weekend’s Values Voter Summit, an annual political gathering for the Religious Right. As Right Wing Watch has documented extensively, many U.S. religious conservatives have been cheerleaders for Putin because of his government’s anti-gay policies and his public support for “traditional values” and “Christian civilization.” Brian Brown, who heads both the National Organization for Marriage and the World Congress of Families, actually traveled to Russia a few years ago to testify on behalf of anti-gay legislation there.

As Right Wing Watch noted last year:

Evangelist Franklin Graham hailed Putin as a hero for taking “a stand to protect his nation’s children from the damaging effects of any gay and lesbian agenda” even as “America’s own morality has fallen so far on this issue”; Bryan Fischer called Putin a “lion of Christianity” and called upon U.S. lawmakers to adopt similar speech prohibitions; Matt Barber marveled that Putin was able to “out-Christian our once-Christian nation”; Sam Rohrer called Putin “the moral leader of the world”; Scott Lively lavished praise on Putin for “ championing traditional marriage and Christian values ”; and Rush Limbaugh applauded Putin for stopping “a full-frontal assault on what has always been considered normalcy.”

In fact, Franklin Graham went to Russia just last fall, where he met with Putin, slammed President Obama for supporting “policies that contradict the teachings of God” and praised the Russian president for “protecting Russian young people against homosexual propaganda.” Graham reportedly said, “I call for prayers for the president of Russia, who is protecting traditional Christianity.” Graham also praised Russian involvement in Syria, which the Russian Orthodox Church has called a “holy battle.”

Putin has developed a mutually beneficial partnership with the Russian Orthodox Church, promoting Orthodoxy as a crucial element of Russian nationalism and a vehicle for extending Russian power and undercutting U.S. influence. Some American Religious Right leaders are taken with Putin’s promotion of a Christian state; the director of last year’s World Congress of Families summit, Janice Shaw Crouse, embraced the blasphemy-law prosecution and jail sentences given to members of the band Pussy Riot for protesting in a cathedral.

While many Religious Right leaders suggest that President Obama is a secret Muslim who wants to replace the Constitution with Sharia law and say marriage equality will open the door to polygamy, we haven’t heard them objecting to Putin and his allies actually allowing polygamy and the imposition of Sharia in Chechnya. Similarly, those who cry that LGBT equality represents a dire threat to religious freedom have not raised a big fuss about a new law signed by Putin this summer that severely restricts the religious freedom of faiths other than the Russian Orthodox Church. Putin has also enacted restrictions on evangelism and backed separatist militias that violently attack Ukrainian Protestants.

Perhaps Putin’s strategic partnership with the Orthodox Church has inspired Trump’s promise to conservative evangelical leaders that he will make Christianity more politically powerful by eliminating legal restrictions on electoral politicking by churches. So far, it has worked for him, helping him line up support from the leaders of the Values Voter Summit.

Steve King: Gitmo Prisoners Held In What 'Could Be A Resort Area'

Rep. Steve King, Republican of Iowa, objected last week to the Obama administration’s most recent transfer of 15 detainees who had been held in the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, telling a local news station that Guantanamo is “a very humane establishment” that is in what “could be a resort area.”

“They have air conditioned rooms in a Caribbean island,” he said of the prisoners, most of whom have been held for years without facing charges, “I mean that would make a terrific resort area there, they set the temperature at 75 degrees because that’s their cultural temperature, they get the choice of three different choices of a meal three times a day, so they’re looking at nine halal means that they get to pick from. I mean, everything is handled very, very humanely down there.”

When Siouxland News asked King what he would do to solve the problem of Guantanamo, King repeated his praises of the facility’s amenities and said that it “would not be being inhumane” to keep prisoners there for life without trial.

“If they killed Americans and in violation of international law, then under international law, we’re treating them better than the most severe punishment that we could deliver to them,” he said. “If you’re in violation of international law, then the penalty for that is execution. So if we keep them in a Caribbean resort area—it could be a resort area, but if we keep them in a Caribbean resort climate with 75 degrees and halal meals and everything handled respectfully, as it absolutely is now, and they stayed there for life, that would not be being inhumane, that would be being human towards the lives of the people they would kill if we turned them loose.“

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 7/21/16

  • James Dobson has officially endorsed Donald Trump. 
  • Roger Ailes has resigned from Fox News. 

Steve King: A History Of Racism

Last night, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, defended his party's relative homogeneity by arguing that white people have "contributed more to civilization" than "any other subgroup of people."

The comment was particularly fitting coming during the convention at which the Republican Party is set to nominate Donald Trump, who has fueled his presidential campaign with appeals to racial animus. And it fit in with a long pattern from King, who is a leader in shaping the GOP's immigration policy and who once said that a "good amount" of Trump's policy plans are "a copy-and-paste from things that I've done."

King made plenty of headlines back in 2013 when he argued against the DREAM Act by claiming that most of the young undocumented immigrants whom the bill would help “weigh 130 pounds and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’ve been hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.”

In a very Trumpian move, King later tried to claim that his remark was accurate and even complimentary.

Like Trump, King makes racial dog-whistles a centerpiece of his anti-immigrant politics. He has repeatedly warned of the changing “demographics” produced by immigration, saying last year, “I like the America we had.”

This style of rhetoric also comes out when King is discussing non-immigration issues. During the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014,King said that racial profiling wasn’t a concern there because the small segment of people who had been rioting and looting were all of the same “continental origin.” King recently raised eyebrows when he filed a bill to defund the plan to put Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, insisting that it would be “racist” to add Tubman to the currency. Just last week, King defended keeping a Confederate flag on his office desk, saying that his critics don’t understand the “real history of the Civil War” and the fact that only a “small part of it was about slavery.” He once falsely claimed that President Obama had “apologized to Africa for slavery” when in fact “there’s nothing for us to apologize for,” and promoted the racist birther conspiracy theory.

While King endorsed Sen. Ted Cruz in the presidential primary, Trump has shown himself to be a fan of King. At one memorable press conference in Iowa in 2014, Trump, who had traveled to the state to campaign for King, stood behind the congressman smirking and nodding as King warned that the U.S. was becoming a “third-world country” thanks to immigration.

Rep. Steve King Defends Confederate Flag On Desk: Slavery Just 'Small Part' Of Civil War

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, landed in some hot water this week after he gave an interview to a local TV station in his Sioux City district office and viewers noticed that he kept a Confederate flag on his desk.

In an interview with Iowa talk radio host Jeff Angelo on Wednesday, King explained that the flag had been on his desk, along with an American flag and a Gadsden flag, for “a long, long time” and “no one has ever commented about it” until now.

He told Angelo that his critics don’t understand the “real history of the Civil War” and that only a “small part of it was about slavery.” He claimed that nobody minded the Confederate flag until the past year or so when people starting using the flag as a “pretext in order to divide us.”

“This is a free country and there’s freedom of speech,” he said, “and, by the way, I’d encourage people to go back and read the real history of the Civil War and find out what it was about. A small part of it was about slavery, but there was a big part of it that was about states’ rights, it was about people that defended their homeland and fought next to their neighbors and their family. And on both sides of that, roughly 600,000 Americans lost their lives in the Civil War and we put an end to slavery, a stain upon our country. And we’ve lived with respecting the South and their way of life for 150 years and now, after 150 years, there has to be an issue about a Confederate flag?”

King told Angelo that he had ancestors who had fought and died in the Union Army.

“Our family cares a lot about unity but also about the truth and accuracy in history,” he said, “and so that Confederate flag has been here for a long, long time, it just does a reflection of our history, it’s not meant to be anything else. And, by the way, up until about a year ago, it never occurred to me that anyone would think that it has something to do with — that it was an advocacy for anything other than, let’s just say, a piece of our history that we should remember and remember the right lessons from.”

“I’m watching our civilization digress,” he added, “because people are pitting — they are looking for pretext in order to divide us, and this is the pretext that they have chosen upon. And so I’d say to them the same thing the Texans say about their flag with the cannon on it: ‘You see this flag? Come and take it.’”

Steve King: Democratic 'Gun-Grabbing' Would Lead To 'A Tremendous Amount of Bloodshed'

Last month during anti-immigrant hate group Federation for American Immigration Reform’s “Hold Their Feet to the Fire” radio row, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, claimed that Democrats want to “grab guns,” which he said would lead to “a tremendous amount of bloodshed” in the U.S.

Speaking with radio host Lars Larson on June 23, King speculated that the FBI dropped an investigation of Orlando nightclub shooter Omar Mateen due to “political correctness in not going after someone that was Muslim” and faulted Democrats for calling attention to gun laws in the wake of the attack.

“This is a gun-grabbing agenda that’s there, and it came right out of the mouth of the president within hours of the shooting in Orlando when he gave his presidential address that spoke to that, and right away he blamed it on guns rather than radical Islamic terrorism,” King said.

He continued, “[Obama’s] got his minions out there blurring this and turning it onto guns.”

King criticized Democrats for “their clamor to grab guns," saying it was not “the gun’s fault.”

“This man was Omar Mateen, was three times, at least three times, was interviewed and questioned by the FBI,” King said. “They decided they would close his file and put it away because they didn’t have enough to work with. I think they might have been influenced by political correctness in not going after someone that was Muslim. But they put the file away, he had met his security background check by the security company that he worked for.

“He could’ve gotten a gun anywhere in this country, anytime he wanted to, and no law that they proposed as Democrats would’ve prevented the shooting in Orlando, unless you take all of our guns away, and that means stop selling them and go confiscate the ones we have, which means a tremendous amount of bloodshed if you try that in this country.”

Steve King: GOP Shouldn't 'Pander' To Hispanics 'Because We're All God's Children'

Last Wednesday, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, joined Iowa radio host Simon Conway at anti-immigrant hate group Federation for American Immigration Reform’s “Hold Their Feet to the Fire” radio row, where he said that it was wrong for the Republican Party to “pander” to Latino voters “because we’re all God’s children.”

“[Republicans] like the cheap labor and Democrats like the expansion of the politics, as you say,” King told Conway while discussing his opposition to immigration reform. “It’s about their ability to document undocumented Democrats, bring more undocumented Democrats in and then document them so that they can vote.”

King continued, “From the time I arrived in this town, my own leadership on the Republican side went to great lengths to try to suppress my verbiage because they said, ‘Don’t talk about that, don’t assign them a motive of it being politically motivated, we really want it to be humanitarian and we want to be open-minded,’ and you know how that all goes.”

King pointed out that Hispanics in South Texas voted Democratic in 2000 and, as a result, the GOP “concluded that they needed to do outreach to Hispanics, and the way to do that was to pander, and it’s a mistake to do that because we’re all God’s children, we’re cut from the same image, and he gives us distinctions so we can tell each other apart, and he gives us inspirations. And so we shouldn’t do identity politics and we shouldn’t pander.”

Conway interjected that “identity politics is racist,” to which King agreed.

Steve King: 'If Everybody Had A Gun' At Orlando Club, 'I Don't Think Anybody Would Have Gotten Shot'

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, told Iowa radio host Simon Conway last week that guns were not to blame for the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub this month because if every person at the club had been carrying a gun, nobody would have been shot.

King and Conway discussed the Orlando attack on Wednesday at the anti-immigrant hate group Federation for American Immigration Reform’s “Hold Their Feet to the Fire” radio row.

The club was protected by an armed police officer who exchanged fire with the assailant, but state law prohibits people from carrying guns in establishments like nightclubs that dispense alcoholic beverages. King, however, said that the alcohol-drinking club-goers should have all been armed.

“I look at this and I think, we have a constitutional right to keep and bear arms and the problem in Orlando at the Pulse was not a problem of the gun laws,” King said, criticizing efforts in Congress to bolster gun regulations after the shooting. “I mean, he followed all of them, the FBI interrogated him at least three times, they decided that he wasn’t enough of a risk. He wouldn’t have been on a list anyway. So anything that they might propose to do would not have prevented the tragedy, the horrific, gruesome tragedy in Orlando, and yet they would trample on the very rights that are needed for people to protect themselves.”

He continued, “If everybody in that nightclub, at the Pulse, had been armed, if everybody had a gun, I would say this: I don’t think anybody would have gotten shot. [In the] first place, I don’t think the perpetrator walks in there. If he does walk in there, then we may have, but there would’ve been a lot fewer than the 102.”

Right Wing Round-Up - 6/21/16

Right Wing Round-Up - 6/7/16

Steve King: 'Good Amount' Of Trump Policy Is 'A Copy-And-Paste From Things That I've Done'

Steve King, the Iowa GOP congressman who once said that DREAM Act beneficiaries are mostly drug runners with “calves the size of cantaloupes because they’ve been hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert,” said yesterday that he expects to be “deeply engaged” in immigration policy if Donald Trump is to become president, boasting that a “good amount” of the immigration policies on Trump’s website are “a copy-and-paste from things that I’ve done.”

King told Jeff Angelo, who was guest-hosting the Iowa talk radio program “Mickelson in the Morning,” that his legislative priorities in the next Congress would depend on who is elected president.

“If it’s Hillary, I’ll be playing a lot of defense because she’ll be pouring an agenda at us,” he said. “And if it’s Trump, then we’ve got an opportunity to move another direction. So, let’s just say, the agenda is going to be continue to kill off bad ideas. And if it’s Trump it will be sort his ideas, but I expect to be deeply engaged in the immigration legislation that would just certainly come and in shaping a fence, a wall and a fence on the southern border. A good amount of what’s on his website is a copy-and-paste from things that I’ve done, and we’ll get along on the immigration, I think, without any problem.”

King also said that he would “push hard for a balanced budget amendment” because if an amendment isn’t ratified, “the movement to do a constitutional convention for that purpose is just going to push one on us anyway.”

We will wait to see if Trump takes up King’s idea of installing an electrified fence at the southern border.

Right Wing Round-Up - 5/18/16

GOP Rep.: US Going 'Downhill' Thanks To Legal Contraception, LGBT Rights

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, blasted the Obama administration on Saturday for a new directive on transgender equality in public schools, joking that the administration won’t be satisfied until all students are “transgendered [sic] vegans” and lamenting a “downhill” descent in the United States that includes the Supreme Court rulings recognizing women’s right to access birth control.

King discussed the Obama administration letter to school districts in the “Caffeinated Thoughts Radio” podcast on Saturday, saying that “pranksters” in their last week of high school are probably “lined up right now” to take advantage of transgender rights to get into girls’ bathrooms.

Think of this: This is the last week of school for a lot of high school seniors. Some of these boys, especially, are a little rowdy when they’ve got their grades already in the bank and are just kind of waiting to go down and accept their diploma. … But, think of this, all over America, they’ve got to be lined up right now, the pranksters, going, ‘I’m going to go into the girls’ room,’ ‘I’m going,’ ‘I dare you,’ ‘Well, the two of us will go,’ ‘The three of us will go.’ There’s a line-up in some school right now and no school can discipline them because the federal government will come in with the Justice Department and jerk their No Child Left Behind funding.

He half-joked that the government would next announce that “‘We’re going to make you all vegans,’ transgendered [sic] vegans would satisfy them.”

“It’s the unhumorous humorous reality of how perverse our society has gotten under Barack Obama,” he added.

When asked if schools would resist the administration’s directive, King was pessimistic, saying that he had seen society “capitulate” to Supreme Court rulings on prayer in schools, abortion rights, and same-sex marriage, along with the court’s rulings in Griswold v. Connecticut and Eisenstaedt v. Baird, which established the right of married and unmarried people, respectively, to access birth control.

With all of these developments, King said, the U.S. has gone “downhill fast” as society has allowed the courts to “change the protocol of the civilization that goes back to Adam and Eve.”

Well, I was sitting [as] a freshman in high school when Murray vs. Curlett came down that ordered that there be no more prayer in the public schools. And I thought then, that was 1963, and I thought then, how are they going to stop us from praying in our schools? They could tape our mouths shut, that doesn’t do it. The only way they could stop us would be to empty the schools out. And in my mind’s eye, I can still see the images that were conjured up: two U.S. Army personnel standing there guarding the doors that were chained shut on our high school. … It was the image that came to mind, the only way to stop us from praying in public schools was to empty the schools out and guard them so we couldn’t sneak in and pray.

And, yet, what happened was, society capitulated to the command of the Supreme Court, and then we saw a watershed that went downhill: Roe v. Wade, Doe v. Bolton, Griswold v. Connecticut, Eisenstadt, on and on and on ... but we went downhill fast. And then you saw, we were all part of the battle against what our Iowa Supreme Court did when they commanded that there be same-sex marriage in Iowa, and then we saw the Supreme Court order, just create a new command in the United States Constitution. So now we’ve got to submit to five members of the Supreme Court and one president and simply let them change the protocol of the civilization that goes back to Adam and Eve? And I’m going to say, society will capitulate because they didn’t fight on marriage.

Listen to the full audio of the interview at Caffeinated Thoughts; the discussion with King begins at around the 3-minute mark.

Steve King Offers To Help Trump With Immigration Policy

Rep. Steve King of Iowa, a key endorser of Sen. Ted Cruz’s presidential run and a leading anti-immigration voice in the house, told an Iowa talk radio program yesterday that although he is not ready to endorse Donald Trump now that he is the presumptive GOP nominee, he is ready to thank Trump for “borrowing” his immigration policy and “help” the candidate solidify his stance on the issue.

King told Iowa radio host Jeff Angelo that he’s not ready to offer a direct endorsement because of the “insults” Trump has hurled at his adversaries: “I’m not a guy who holds a lot of grudges, but I have to be able to remember some things along the way.”

But he seemed ready to work with Trump on crafting a restrictive immigration policy:

I’ve said that we need to support the nominee that’s produced by the rules. I’ve never seen a nominee pour out so many insults on other people as Donald Trump has. This isn’t the day to highlight all of those and grind through all of that, but I’ll just say this, that I think Donald Trump is going to have to do a job of reaching out to conservatives and convincing. You’re a candidate, you’ve got to convince people to come in behind you. We had somewhere between 5 and 8 million conservatives who didn’t come out to vote when Mitt Romney was on the ballot, and he may well be president today if he had been able to mobilize those conservatives.

So I want to hear some things from Donald Trump on how it will be and what he will do. It’s been pretty hard to figure that out over the last few months. And I’m not going to say that I’m going to be a ‘Never Trump’ person, don’t expect that at all out of me. Expect me to say to Donald Trump: ‘Thanks a lot for borrowing my immigration policy, you get to keep it and I’ll help you with that, and let’s see what else we can do, if we can work together to strengthen this.’

And so I’d like to see it put together in a way that we can put the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle together where there’s a whole, coherent policy in the Trump campaign that can stand up and win an election, and something that is so firm that he stands on it and we stand on it and we get to a place where we can stand on it together.

Somehow, we think that King and Trump will be able to make up eventually. Before Trump and Cruz started locking heads, King praised Trump for raising the profile of anti-immigrant policies.

And who can forget when Trump traveled to Iowa to campaign for King in 2014, resulting in a press conference where Trump stood by as King warned of immigrants bringing in Ebola and beheadings and heaped praise on Trump for his "brain" and "character."

"I have this affinity to, I'll just say, get the opportunity to claim as friends a unique individual that has blazed his own trail time and time again," King said at the time, "one who never puts his finger in the wind, but puts his brain to it and his character to it and his work ethic to it and his instincts to it, and time after time, when the hand of Donald Trump reached out and touched something, it turned into something good for America."

Tea Party Group Draws Crowd Of Tens To Protest Supreme Court Confirmation

Today, as thousands of people gathered in front of the Supreme Court to voice their support of President Obama’s executive actions on immigration, a somewhat smaller crowd organized by Tea Party Patriots held forth against the DAPA/DACA actions and urged the Senate not to confirm President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland.

We counted about 20 people at the Tea Party Patriots event at 11 am, shortly before the event’s speeches were scheduled to begin: 

The heavily outnumbered protesters carried signs saying “#NoHearingsNoVotes,” “#TheDecisionIsOurs,” “#LetThePeopleDecide” and “Let The People Have A Voice On The Future Of The Court,” the message that anti-Garland groups have settled on to make their quest to block hearings on a Supreme Court nomination sound like a populist rallying cry. The sign on a podium labeled Garland “Obama’s Rubber Stamp.”

There was a high ratio of Republican and conservative movement speakers to grassroots activists, asRep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas,Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo.,Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, and the Judicial Crisis Network’s Carrie Severino addressed the small crowd.

Here’s another view of the Tea Party Patriots event:

 

UPDATE: Politico reports:

News concerences sponsored by the Tea Party and FreedomWorks also featured Reps. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.) and Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), as well as other speakers who unsuccessfully tried to lead the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance and "America the Beautiful." An effort to lead a singalong of the national anthem backfired when the singer forgot the lyrics midway through, drawing jeers.

 

Steve King: GOP Primary Voters Channeling The Spirit Of The Revolutionary War

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, who has endorsed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s presidential run, said in an interview with Breitbart’s Stephen Bannon yesterday that the success of “anti-establishment candidates” like Cruz and Donald Trump in the Republican primary shows that Republican voters are channeling the spirit of the American Revolution.

King attributed the success of Cruz and Trump to frustration that Republican leaders in Congress “haven’t followed through on their promises” to repeal the Affordable Care Act, block executive actions on immigration, or call out the president “on his constitutional violations of all kinds.”

He explained that it all started with the Tea Party, which he described as a Christian conservative movement with an energy that “goes back to the pipes of the Revolutionary War” and that is now reflected by the majority of the Republican electorate.

We have watched this within the Tea Party, and they are full-spectrum, conservative Christian, constitutional conservatives for the most part — and they don’t exclude people who are conservatives that happen to be of another faith or religion at all, they’re very welcoming to all people that would join the cause — but that energy and fervor that goes back to that, let’s say goes back to the pipes of the revolutionary war, that’s something that motivates us, we’re rooted in our history, it’s a common historical experience that we have.

And they know that the Declaration and the Constitution were shaped then, and if we fail to adhere to those values, if this is the time to restore and refurbish the pillars of American exceptionalism, that if we fail, our Constitution will be lost. And that’s the 80 percent out there of the Republicans and that’s about the zero percent of the Democrats.

King also explained that he knew he could count on Cruz in 2013 when he held an all-day press conference in protest of the Gang of Eight immigration bill and “for 45 minutes, [Cruz] delivered chapter and verse of everything that I have fought for and believed in with regard to the immigration issue.”

He said that his respect for Cruz was further cemented when he learned that the Texas senator “was raised with the Bible and the Constitution at the kitchen table, side by side, indexed to each other” and that’s when “I knew that it’s in his bones.”

Steve King Suspects 'A Good Chunk' Of Remittances To Mexico Are 'Laundered Drug Money'

When Donald Trump suggested this week that he would make Mexico pay for a border wall by threatening to cut off all remittance payments sent by American workers to family members in Mexico, he was echoing years of calls from anti-immigrant politicians like former Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann and Louisiana Sen. David Vitter to punish immigrants who send money to their families.

It isn’t exactly a surprise, then, that Rep. Steve King of Iowa, one of the most vocal anti-immigration advocates in Congress, seems fairly supportive of Trump’s plan despite having endorsed Sen. Ted Cruz for president.

Newsmax host Steve Malzberg asked King about Trump’s plan in an interview yesterday, and King said that while he was “torn between a couple of two fires” on the issue, he’d “like to see Donald Trump go a little further with this dialogue and see what we might be able to get done.”

King, who once insisted that most people eligible for the DREAM Act have “calves the size of cantaloupes because they’ve been hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert,” said that he suspected that “a good chunk” of remittances to Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America are “laundered drug money.”

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Steve King Posts Archive

Miranda Blue, Thursday 09/15/2016, 11:11am
On his program on Monday night, comedian Jimmy Fallon reacted to Hillary Clinton’s comment that a number of Trump supporters fall into a “basket of deplorables” by joking, “So, if you're keeping track, Trump supporters are deplorable, and Hillary supporters are deportable.” Fallon’s “deportable” remark could have been a reference to Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King’s characterization of Michelle Obama’s guest at last year’s State of the Union Address as “a deportable.”  King, however, did not see any... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 09/14/2016, 5:34pm
Marge Baker @ Other Words: The Supreme Court is on the Ballot for 2016. Josh Feldman @ Mediaite: Hannity Invokes His Martial Arts Training in Response to Attacks from #NeverTrump-ers. Patrick G. Lee @ Mother Jones: Trump Is Recruiting an Army of Poll Watchers. It's Even Worse Than It Sounds. Richard Bartholomew: Robert Spencer Denounces Walid Shoebat and Son for “Sensationalistic Unreliability” and “Dishonesty”. Brad Reed @ Raw Story: Rep. Steve King: Only ‘natural families’ should get a child care tax credit... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Tuesday 09/13/2016, 2:40pm
In an interview today on Newsmax, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, denied that San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has a constitutional right to refuse to stand for the National Anthem, even going so far as to accuse him of sympathizing with the terrorist group ISIS. “I understand that he has an Islamic girlfriend that is his fiancée and that this has changed him, has taken on some different political views along the way, this is activism that is sympathetic to ISIS,” he told host Steve Malzberg. “For me, if I’m the coach, I would say, ‘You’re... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Friday 09/09/2016, 11:23am
One of the notable developments in right-wing-watching in recent years has been how enthusiastically many Religious Right leaders have embraced Russia’s anti-democratic president, former KGB official Vladimir Putin. It seems even more remarkable that the Republican Party’s presidential nominee has been lavishing praise on Putin even as Russia maneuvers to diminish America’s influence in the world. As president, Putin has consolidated his power through attacks on the independent media, the persecution of political opponents, and restrictions on civil society. He has annexed... MORE >
Miranda Blue, Monday 08/22/2016, 3:30pm
Rep. Steve King, Republican of Iowa, objected last week to the Obama administration’s most recent transfer of 15 detainees who had been held in the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, telling a local news station that Guantanamo is “a very humane establishment” that is in what “could be a resort area.” “They have air conditioned rooms in a Caribbean island,” he said of the prisoners, most of whom have been held for years without facing charges, “I mean that would make a terrific resort area there, they set the temperature at 75 degrees because that... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 07/21/2016, 6:25pm
Donald Trump’s veterans adviser stands by his call for Hillary Clinton to be executed.  James Dobson has officially endorsed Donald Trump.  Roger Ailes has resigned from Fox News.  Phyllis Schlafly says we don’t ever need a female president: “Our greatest presidents have all been men, and they’ve been very good for our country.”  Elizabeth Lee Vliet warns that voting for Hillary Clinton “may well cost you your life.”  Lastly, Steve King just can’t help himself. MORE >
Miranda Blue, Tuesday 07/19/2016, 12:15pm
Last night, Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, defended his party's relative homogeneity by arguing that white people have "contributed more to civilization" than "any other subgroup of people." The comment was particularly fitting coming during the convention at which the Republican Party is set to nominate Donald Trump, who has fueled his presidential campaign with appeals to racial animus. And it fit in with a long pattern from King, who is a leader in shaping the GOP's immigration policy and who once said that a "good amount" of Trump's policy plans... MORE >
Miranda Blue, Friday 07/15/2016, 11:25am
Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, landed in some hot water this week after he gave an interview to a local TV station in his Sioux City district office and viewers noticed that he kept a Confederate flag on his desk. In an interview with Iowa talk radio host Jeff Angelo on Wednesday, King explained that the flag had been on his desk, along with an American flag and a Gadsden flag, for “a long, long time” and “no one has ever commented about it” until now. He told Angelo that his critics don’t understand the “real history of the Civil War” and that only a... MORE >