Paul Ryan

House Speaker Paul Ryan Reportedly Listens To Hack Historian David Barton 'All The Time'

For the last several years, dozens of members of Congress have joined Religious Right leaders every April for a "Washington: A Man of Prayer" event held inside the U.S. Capitol at which speakers have repeatedly warned that 9/11 was God's judgment on America and that God will punish this nation for legalizing same-sex marriage.

Last year, House Speaker Paul Ryan spoke at the event and today, Dan Cummins, the founder and one of the key organizers of the annual prayer gathering, published a piece in Charisma saying that having godly leaders like Ryan in office is a sign that America is undergoing "a third spiritual awakening."

Ryan, Cummins revealed, is a big fan of right-wing pseudo-historian David Barton and has been busy laying the groundwork for repealing the Johnson Amendment, which prohibits churches and all tax-exempt organizations from "directly or indirectly participating in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office."

Barton, of course, is a notoriously anti-gay Religious Right activist who has repeatedly stated that we will never find a cure for AIDS because the disease is God's punishment for homosexuality and whose historical work is so shoddy that his book on Thomas Jefferson was withdrawn from publication by its Christian publisher.

Speaker Ryan is an avid fan of historian David Barton. "I listen to him all the time, even in my car while driving," he said. Because of Barton's teachings, Speaker Ryan is very knowledgeable of the 1954 Johnson Amendment (putting political speech restrictions on pastors from their pulpits) and its devastating effects on our culture.

He understands "first causative principle"—that the 1954 Johnson Amendment eventually was responsible for prayer and Bible reading being taken out of schools in 1963, the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 and redefining of marriage in 2016—all because pastors were silenced from speaking out politically. That's why Speaker Ryan wants the Johnson Amendment repealed legislatively. He knows pastors being set free to preach again to the nation regarding these moral and political issues is a must to turn the nation around.

In early January at the Republican Retreat in Baltimore, Ryan and I began discussing how Congress could legislatively repeal it. Later, I spent one hour educating Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (chair of Republican Conference, whose husband is a pastor) and her entire senior staff on the Johnson Amendment toward the goal of repealing it.

Rep. Kevin Brady is chair of the Ways and Means Committee through which any legislation to repeal would have to come to the floor, and he is totally on board. Ryan directed me to Brady. Brady also gave me approval to hold three Sunday services (beginning Sept. 4) in the Ways and Means Committee room in the Capitol. Brady told me with a big smile on his face, "I'm thrilled you're having church in the Ways and Means Committee Room. Glad to let you use it."

So, long before Donald Trump said anything about repealing the Johnson Amendment, Speaker Ryan had been working on it. For the first time in 60 years, the opportunity to repeal the Johnson Amendment exists because of Ryan's leadership, spirituality and love of Jesus! Now we need a Republican president in the Oval Office to sign a repeal into law (which is more effective than just an executive order)!

Speaker Ryan has formed a committee of five members of Congress (to which I was invited to participate) to report to him on inviting pastors to the Capitol to have lunch with him and arrange congressional-clergy townhall meetings in the Cannon Caucus Room. We are planning our second one in November, and we'll form an email alert system so Speaker Ryan can contact pastors on how to inform their churches to pray for America.

This is unprecedented and historic! This is God answering our prayers.

Paul Ryan Endorses Donald Trump Because Why Not?

Shortly after it became clear that Donald Trump would be the GOP presidential nominee, House Speaker Paul Ryan said to much fanfare that he was not prepared to endorse Trump because the candidate had shown an unwillingness to unify the Republican Party.

Ryan, who has criticized Trump for his brief refusal to disavow the support of white nationalist David Duke and his proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the country, emphasized that Trump must bring Republicans together and outline his beliefs about limited government if he wants his endorsement.

Trump went on to criticize Ryan and other Republicans, including Ryan’s 2012 running mate, Mitt Romney, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. When Trump lashed out at Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez while campaigning in her state last week, Ryan defended her. Trump has also made a point to assure voters that he won’t act “presidential” and that he hasn’t changed any of the extremist views that he espoused during the primary race.

Despite the fact that Trump has not done absolutely anything that Ryan asked of him, Ryan endorsed him anyway today in an op-ed for his hometown paper:

Now that he’s officially gotten behind Trump’s campaign, the mythical image of Ryan as a principled conservative visionary can finally be put to rest.

Phyllis Schlafly Praises Jeff Sessions, Trump & Cruz, Warns GOP 'Kingmakers'

In her February newsletter,  which came out just after Sen. Jeff Sessions’ endorsement of Donald Trump, Eagle Forum founder Phyllis Schlafly reproduced a column she wrote earlier in the month gushing about a round of interviews Sessions had given in which he said 2016 “is the last chance for the American people to take back control of their government.” Sessions helped Trump craft his immigration platform and previously backed his call for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

Here’s Schlafly:

“To win, Republicans need to demonstrate that they care about the average person who goes to work every day,” he added. Average Americans are tired of paying billions in welfare handouts to immigrants who are undermining U.S. wages. “People should have total confidence and a clear commitment on those issues. If they don’t, then they don’t have my vote,” he said…

Our immigration policy has been anti-American, decade after decade, and the voters need to know that 2016 might be our last chance to elect a president who can reduce this tide of illegals crossing our borders. The interests of working Americans must “be put first,” Sessions urged. “We need a president with the credibility to tell the world that the time of illegality is over. Do not come to this country unlawfully,” he said.

In the same column, Schlafly praised “outsider” candidates like Trump and Ted Cruz, and warned against “the Washington-based Republican Establishment” who she said are plotting to “take back control of the party from the outsiders and grassroots.” Among those she names as would-be “kingmakers” are House Speaker Paul Ryan – “who is openly contemptuous of Trump and has little use for Cruz” – and South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, who offended Schlafly by using her response to the State of the Union Address “to slam the ‘angriest voices’ in the presidential campaign and disavow the Republican front-runner’s popular call for a temporary pause in Muslim immigration.”

Schlafly vows that the Republican platform will be written by GOP delegates who are disappointed with the ineffectiveness of congressional Republicans and who “will have no use for Ryan’s open-borders ideology, which holds that anyone who can find a low-wage job should be allowed to settle in the United States.” Schlafly warns that a deadlocked convention could make  someone like Ryan the nominee. “Such an outcome,” she writes, “could destroy the Republican Party and guarantee a Democratic victory by causing disheartened grassroots voters to stay home and tempting an aggrieved candidate to mount a third-party or independent presidential campaign.”

In January, Schlafly declared that Donald Trump was “the only hope” to defeat the GOP’s “Kingmakers.”

Congressional Republicans Promote 2016 'Ideas' Strategy, Warn Against Trump At Heritage 'Conservative Policy Summit'

The Heritage Foundation’s political advocacy affiliate, Heritage Action for America, held an all-day “Conservative Policy Summit” on Wednesday, during which Heritage staff and supporters heard from nearly two dozen conservative Republican members of Congress. Heritage's president, former U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint, reaffirmed one of the organization’s longstanding principles — that you can’t legitimately call yourself an economic conservative if you aren’t also a social conservative.

The morning consisted of speeches on “conservative policy pillars” – House Speaker Paul Ryan on leadership, Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa on defense, Rep. Mark Walker of North Carolina on social policy, and Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska on economic policy. The afternoon was built around panel discussions on the House Freedom Caucus, the freshman class, differences in the workings of the House and Senate, and the state of the conservative movement. What was meant to be a closing debate on the filibuster between Rep. Bob Goodlatte and Sen. Mike Lee turned into a moderated conversation with Lee — who defends the filibuster against frustrated right-wing House members — when Goodlatte didn’t show.

Ryan’s opening speech set a mostly high-minded tone, saying conservatives must address Americans who are hurting and convince them that a conservative pro-growth agenda offers them more promise than “failed” liberal policies. He called for a “clarifying election” that would, like Ronald Reagan’s 1980 victory, come with a mandate to enact conservative policies. Ryan warned that with one more progressive presidency “liberals will lock in all their gains” — and that Democrats’ refusal to deal with entitlement reform would ensure monetary and fiscal crises.

In remarks that may have been intended for his Heritage Action hosts and members of the Freedom Caucus, Ryan urged conservatives not to engage in a “circular firing squad” or waste time fighting over tactics or impugning one others’ motives. “We can’t let how someone votes on an amendment to an appropriations bill define what it means to be conservative, because it’s setting our sights too low,” he said.

Ryan also said Republicans must not be merely oppositional. He suggested that conservatives who promised to repeal Obamacare while Obama was still in office were merely setting themselves up for failure. He said House Republicans are putting together a five part ideas-based agenda that will define the year in the areas of national security, jobs and the economy, healthcare, poverty and opportunity, and restoring the Constitution.

Rep. Mark Walker, a Southern Baptist minister, was introduced by Heritage’s Jennifer Marshall as a champion of the right-wing social agenda on marriage, abortion and religious liberty. Walker said the country was founded on traditional values, but that decades of liberal policies have led to the “undoing” of communities: “The federal government has hijacked the American Dream and the family has been decimated.”

Walker said Congress must “eliminate every taxpayer dollar that goes to Planned Parenthood,” saying, “There is no other freedom-robbing, opportunity-destroyer and life-killer that is more intentional than Planned Parenthood.”  Walker did not directly address the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling or the resistance to the ruling being pushed by some social conservatives. In a question about how to make marriage fashionable, he said the church has to do its job in teaching the truth about family.

Walker said people are right to be angry about some things, like classrooms indoctrinating students with “progressive secularism,” and said that anger can be a powerful motivator if properly targeted. He urged people to be discerning and compassionate in order to more effectively make the conservative case. “It’s okay to be a loud voice as long as you’re doing more than just making noise,” he said.

Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska, a former college president tasked with talking about economic freedom, said that the American idea of limited government and conservatives’ commitment to the free market are grounded in “an anthropological claim about human dignity.” Like other speakers, Sasse denounced what he described as regulatory overreach. He disputed the characterization by former Democratic Rep. Barney Frank that government is “another word for the things we choose to do together.” No, said Sasse, government is not community, but compulsion, power and force.

Sasse seemed to criticize Donald Trump’s campaign without mentioning the candidate by name (something Ryan had also done), saying it was wrong to think that government power or a single election can fix things.

A lot of what is happening in the Republican electorate right now is the downstream effects of the tribalism of race, class and gender identity politics on the left, that some of the right have decided, well, if they’re going to have an identity politics, maybe we should have an identity politics. And that is an abandonment of the American idea. We already have one post-constitutional party in this country; we don’t need a second one. And so the idea that there is a strongman that can save us isn’t true. It’s understandable why it can be attractive, but it isn’t true. And so if you pretend that if only we gave more power to one guy in Washington, but he was the right guy, everything would be fixed, I submit to you that that act is the act of saying everything is already lost in the American experiment. Because what America needs is a constitutional recovery, not a Republican Barack Obama.

A panel with members of the House Freedom Caucus — what moderator Fred Barnes referred to affectionately as the “Bomb-thrower Caucus” — included Reps. Jim Jordan of Ohio, Raul Labrador of Idaho, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Mick Mulvaney of South Carolina. A common theme of their remarks was that Republicans in Congress have lost the trust of the American people by overpromising and under-delivering because too many of them get to D.C. and get talked into being a “team player.” Members of the Freedom Caucus and panel of House freshmen all seemed optimistic that the House would function more effectively under the speakership of Paul Ryan than it did under deal-maker John Boehner.

Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia talked about the new Article I project that has been launched by Sen. Mike Lee of Utah and others, which is designed to limit the regulatory power of federal agencies and the discretionary power of the president. (Lee and Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Texas described the Article I project in National Review this week.) Later in the day Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona also mentioned the project, saying he hoped it would reinvigorate the constitutional balance between the legislative and other branches.

But in spite of the perils they said face America, panelists were positive about the state of the conservative movement. Rep. Gary Palmer of Alabama noted that the conservative movement today has many assets that Ronald Reagan didn’t, including a national network of state-level think tanks and advocacy organizations, political groups devoted to candidate recruitment and training and grassroots mobilization, and GOP control in most statehouses and legislatures. Rep. Dave Brat of Virginia, who waged the right-wing insurgent campaign that defeated former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in a Republican primary, predicted a conservative wave election. And Rep. Bill Flores of Texas said the conservative movement is strong, as reflected in the success of “outsider” candidates in the Iowa caucuses and the majorities in the House and Senate — there’s just “one big step to go.”

Paul Ryan Is Not The Moderate The Far-Right Says He Is

Paul Ryan is the latest in a stream of Republicans to aim for the position of speaker of the House after John Boehner announced his plan to step down last month. The House Freedom Caucus, the far-right group of members with Tea Party ties, was at first reluctant to back Ryan, and is even now catching criticism from conservatives who believe Ryan is not conservative enough to represent far-right values as speaker.

The fact that Ryan is now seen as a “moderate” in the Republican party shows just how far to the right the party has moved.

Ryan has courted the far-right for years. He has spoken at the Values Voter Summit, an event sponsored by the radically anti-gay Family Research Council, the American Family Association, and others. At the 2012 summit, Ryan’s appearance was billed alongside a litany of ultraconservative leaders and even a self-proclaimed “former terrorist” Kamal Saleem, who told summit attendees that Hillary Clinton would ban churches before leaving the State Department. Ryan has also courted the Religious Right at Ralph Reed’s Faith and Freedom Coalition Conference. Religious Right activists were ecstatic after Mitt Romney selected Ryan as his running mate, with Reed praising Ryan for his stellar anti-choice voting record.

Ryan also promotes a far-right policy agenda. He is vehemently anti-choice, going so far as to support forcing pregnant victims of rape to carry their pregnancies to term. Ryan even partnered with Todd “Legitimate Rape” Akin to introduce a bill that would have given zygotes personhood, effectively criminalizing many forms of birth control.

Furthermore, Ryan has vowed to oppose marriage equality and is a climate change denier. This record has won Ryan the praise of Religious Right activists including Concerned Women for America’s Penny Nance, the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins, and the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer, who noted that Ryan’s voting record fit with “biblical understanding” of the environment.

Ryan has also tried to put a Christian face on Ayn Rand-inspired economics. In the budget plan he unveiled in 2012, much of the spending cuts came from programs for the poor, such as food stamps, housing assistance and employment services, in addition to slashes to Social Security. Ryan made his feelings toward low-income people known when he blamed poverty on the “culture” of “inner city men” and insinuated that kids who receive free lunches at school don’t have caring parents. While Ryan cited his faith for the creation of his budget, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops urged him to reconsider his policies and Jesuit scholars from Georgetown University wrote in a letter to Ryan that his budget plan “appears to reflect the values of your favorite philosopher, Ayn Rand, rather than the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”

While Tea Party members clamor that Ryan is too moderate, his anti-choice, anti-LGBT, anti-environmentalist, and draconian economic record shows just how extreme he is.

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/22/15

  • RH Reality Check: The Right’s Answer to Gutting Planned Parenthood? Elementary Schools, Homeless Shelters, Jails.

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/12/14

Right Wing Round-Up - 3/6/14

Right Wing Round-Up - 12/11/13

Right Wing Round-Up

Religious Right Will Cheer Tea Party Extremism at Values Voter Summit

Boehner threatens the global economy w/ default, the Tea Party shutdown continues & a new Supreme Court term could do harm to campaign finance, reproductive choice & church-state separation...perfect week for the Values Voter Summit!

Civil Rights Groups Urge GOP Leaders to Skip Values Voter Summit

This weekend, Religious Right leaders and GOP politicians will gather in Washington for the Values Voter Summit, an annual event that highlights the cozy relationship between Republican elected officials and extreme right-wing groups.

The event is hosted by the Family Research Council, a group with a long record of pushing false anti-gay propaganda. And one of the event’s major sponsors is the American Family Association, whose extreme right-wing views are expressed on a daily basis by its spokesman Bryan Fischer.

On Friday, People For the American Way joined with the Southern Poverty Law Center, Faithful America, GLAAD, the Human Rights Campaign, the NAACP and the National Council of La Raza to send a letter to every public official scheduled to speak at this year’s Values Voter Summit, urging them to withdraw from the event.

Among the scheduled speakers are Sens. Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz and Tim Scott and Reps. Paul Ryan, Randy Forbes, Michele Bachmann, Jim Bridenstine, Louie Gohmert, Jim Jordan, Steve King, Steve Scalise and Scott Turner.

The letter [pdf] reads in part:

We understand that you’ve been invited to speak at the upcoming Values Voter Summit being held in Washington, D.C., from Oct. 11-13. Given the demonizing lies about the LGBT community spread by the host, the Family Research Council (FRC), and another major sponsor of the event, the American Family Association (AFA), we urge you to not lend the prestige of your office to the summit.

The FRC has amassed an extensive record of vilifying gays and lesbians with falsehoods – portraying them as sick, evil, incestuous, violent, perverted, and a danger to the nation.  Perhaps its most insidious claim is that gay men molest children at a far higher rate than heterosexual men – a claim refuted by all credible scientific authorities, including the American Psychological Association. Yet the FRC has continued to smear gays and lesbians by claiming  that pedophilia, in the words of FRC President Tony Perkins, “is a homosexual problem.”

Perkins also says the “It Gets Better” campaign, an initiative designed to give LGBT students hope for a better tomorrow, is “disgusting” and part of a “concerted effort” to “recruit” children into the gay “lifestyle.” One senior FRC official has even argued that homosexuality should be illegal.

The AFA’s Bryan Fischer, who serves as the group’s spokesman and director of issue analysis, frequently blames homosexuality for the Holocaust and Nazi Party: “Homosexuality gave us Adolph Hitler, and homosexuals in the military gave us the Brown Shirts, the Nazi war machine and 6 million dead Jews.” He also promotes the views of the American architect of the “Kill the Gays” bill in Uganda.

Demonizing the LGBT community has consequences. As FBI data demonstrate, it is one of the groups most likely to be victimized by violent hate crimes. Defaming them publicly day after day – as the FRC and the AFA do – only throws fuel on the fire.

The bigotry of the FRC and the AFA is not limited to gays and lesbians. Fischer, for example, has said that African Americans “rut like rabbits” and argued that women should be kicked out of politics and the military. He’s also stated that Hispanics are “socialists by nature”  and come here to “plunder” our country. The FRC’s executive vice president, Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin, has said Jews must be converted to Christianity and has argued that “Islam is not a religion and does not deserve First Amendment protections” – a statement that is antithetical to American ideals.

In 2011, we urged Mitt Romney not to share a stage with the extremists, and particularly Fischer, at that year’s Values Voter Summit. Although Romney still attended, he also made a point of calling out Fischer’s “poisonous language." This year, Fischer was noticeably not listed as a speaker at the summit, although his employer remains a sponsor.
 

Right Wing Leftovers - 1/4/13

  • Paul Ryan will be the keynote speaker at the anti-choice Susan B. Anthony List Gala. 
  • Ryan was also among the 67 Republicans to oppose a bill providing $9.7 billion in Sandy relief, which the House passed after the GOP leadership withdrew a much more substantial aid package.
  • Apparently, conservatives are shocked and dismayed that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie would dare to criticize House Republicans for pulling the plug on the Sandy aid bill. 
  • National Organization for Marriage founder Maggie Gallagher has ended her column after seventeen years.

Right Wing Round-Up - 11/5/12

Ryan's Real Values? Reed and Rand

Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan will hold a town hall teleconference with Ralph Reed, the disgraced former head of the Christian Coalition who is making a political comeback with a conservative voter turnout project called the Faith and Freedom Coalition. That group is sending voters flyers warning that reelecting Obama would allow the president to “complete America’s destruction.” They also compare Obama’s policies to the threat posed to America by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

For all Paul Ryan’s talk about values, it’s worth remembering who his pal Ralph Reed is: a self-enriching win-at-any-cost political operative whose own campaign for office was tanked by revelations of Reed’s involvement in a scandal with Jack Abramoff, the convicted corrupt lobbyist who helped Reed get business “humping in corporate accounts” after he left the Christian Coalition and started his own consulting firm.

As Kyle has noted:

There are few political operatives active today that are as ruthless and cynical as Ralph Reed.

Reed is, after all, the man who infamously declared that he specializes in "guerrilla warfare," and bragged "I paint my face and travel at night. You don't know it's over until you're in a body bag." 

Reed also knowingly took hundreds of thousands of dollars from corrupt lobbyist Jack Abramoff to manipulate and mobilize his Religious Right allies to fight gambling expansions in order to protect Abramoff's client's gambling interests.  Reed even had some of the money laundered through third-parties in order to try and conceal its origins, yet continues to insist to this day that he is "proud" of the "outstanding" work he did on behalf of Abramoff and his clients.

Ryan cites his Catholic faith to distract attention from his devotion to Ayn Rand and her infamous hostility to charity toward the poor.  Reed himself preaches the Tea Party’s notion that federal government programs that serve the poor and elderly are unconstitutional. (And of course, for a big chunk of the Religious Right, the social safety net is not only unconstitutional, but unbiblical.)

The FFC held several events at the Republican National Convention featuring other notable “values” stalwarts such as Newt Gingrich, union-busting Scott Walker, anti-gay activist Jim Garlow and down-the-government-in-the-bathtub anti-tax zealot Grover Norquist.

Reed said earlier this year that American Christians must get down on their knees and beg God for forgiveness for “what we have allowed to happen” to the country – then God might have mercy on America (the implication being that God would help Romney defeat Obama).

 Back in 2008, John McCain was embarrassed by watchdog groups over his participation in a fundraiser organized by Reed; in the end Reed did not attend. Four years later, the values-promoting Paul Ryan seems to have no hesitation embracing Reed, who exemplifies the self-promoting values of Ryan inspiration Ayn Rand.

Paul Ryan Promises Focus on the Family that He Will Fight Gay Equality

During an interview with Focus on the Family president Jim Daly, Paul Ryan reassured the anti-gay group that a Romney-Ryan administration will fiercely oppose gay rights. Focus on the Family and its founder James Dobson have a long history of promoting anti-gay policies and ex-gay therapy, and earned a shout-out from Romney earlier this week while campaigning in Colorado, where it is headquartered.

While Romney has moved in his career from backing gay rights to becoming a vocal foe, Ryan has a solidly anti-gay voting record in Congress. Ryan told Daly, whose political arm has been spending money on behalf of Romney and a number of other Republican candidates like Todd Akin, that the ticket is firmly against same-sex marriage and that he was a “big supporter” of a 2006 amendment which enshrined marriage discrimination into the Wisconsin state constitution. He also said the Obama administration’s decision not to defend the unconstitutional Defense of Marriage Act hurt the “rule of law” and “contradicts our system of government,” however, a number of presidents including George W. Bush have not defended statutes they deemed unconstitutional.

Daly: Focus on the Family has been behind the scenes working for years to defend marriage and to speak out for marriage and the importance of marriage. I think thirty-two out of thirty-two states where we have helped put a ballot initiative or some other mechanism in front of the people, we have won that thirty-two out of thirty-two times. It seems like when it’s in front of the people they vote for it, if it’s the state-level judges they will try to do it by fiat or if it is simply some other mechanism, the State House passes it without the vote of the people. For the Romney-Ryan ticket, when you look at marriage, what do we need to do in the culture to lift up and strengthen the very core building block of society and that’s family.

Ryan: It’s the foundation for society and for family for thousands of years. First of all, Mitt Romney and I — I’ll just say it, it’s worth repeating — we believe marriage is between one man and one woman, that’s number one. Number two, you know where I come from we had one of those amendments in Wisconsin, I was a big supporter of it and we passed it like you say, where it’s put on the ballot it passes. The second point is, President Obama gave up defending the Defense of Marriage Act in the courts, I mean, not only is this decision to abandon this law the wrong decision, it passed in a bipartisan manner, it is very troubling because it undermines not only traditional marriage but it contradicts our system of government. It’s not the president’s job to pick and choose which laws he likes. A Romney administration will protect traditional marriage and the rule of law and we will provide the Defense of Marriage Act the proper defense in the courts that it deserves.

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/1/12

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/26/12

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/24/12

Right Wing Round-Up - 9/21/12

Sex, Lies, and Bloodlust: What the Values Voter Summit Tells us About the Religious Right and the Republican Party

During this past weekend’s Values Voter Summit, the annual family reunion of the far right, RWW posted many memorable video highlights. What does it all tell us about the Religious Right and today’s Republican Party? First are foremost, Republican leaders are unwilling to distance themselves from the far-right fringes of their base, especially in an election year in which conservative evangelical voters are not tremendously excited about Mitt Romney. Romney took a pass this year, and it’s not hard to understand why. Last year, organizers maliciously put him on stage right before the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer, who had ridiculed Romney’s Mormonism. A supporter of Texas Gov. Rick Perry denounced Mormonism as a cult, and the flap over Romney’s faith was the dominant story coming out of the gathering. It was much safer to let Paul Ryan represent the ticket this year, and to have other speakers like Rick Santorum and Rick Scarborough ensure evangelicals that voting for Romney was in fact a good thing. Romney did send a tepidly-received video, which seemed almost an afterthought. What is motivating these activists is not enthusiasm for Romney but their hostility toward the Obama administration.
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Paul Ryan Posts Archive

Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 08/18/2016, 11:06am
For the last several years, dozens of members of Congress have joined Religious Right leaders every April for a "Washington: A Man of Prayer" event held inside the U.S. Capitol at which speakers have repeatedly warned that 9/11 was God's judgment on America and that God will punish this nation for legalizing same-sex marriage. Last year, House Speaker Paul Ryan spoke at the event and today, Dan Cummins, the founder and one of the key organizers of the annual prayer gathering, published a piece in Charisma saying that having godly leaders like Ryan in office is a sign that... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 06/02/2016, 4:15pm
Shortly after it became clear that Donald Trump would be the GOP presidential nominee, House Speaker Paul Ryan said to much fanfare that he was not prepared to endorse Trump because the candidate had shown an unwillingness to unify the Republican Party. Ryan, who has criticized Trump for his brief refusal to disavow the support of white nationalist David Duke and his proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the country, emphasized that Trump must bring Republicans together and outline his beliefs about limited government if he wants his endorsement. Trump went on to criticize Ryan and other... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Monday 02/29/2016, 3:35pm
In her February newsletter,  which came out just after Sen. Jeff Sessions’ endorsement of Donald Trump, Eagle Forum founder Phyllis Schlafly reproduced a column she wrote earlier in the month gushing about a round of interviews Sessions had given in which he said 2016 “is the last chance for the American people to take back control of their government.” Sessions helped Trump craft his immigration platform and previously backed his call for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S. Here’s Schlafly: “To win, Republicans need to demonstrate that they care about... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Thursday 02/04/2016, 1:51pm
The Heritage Foundation’s political advocacy affiliate, Heritage Action for America, held an all-day “Conservative Policy Summit” on Wednesday, during which Heritage staff and supporters heard from nearly two dozen conservative Republican members of Congress. Heritage's president, former U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint, reaffirmed one of the organization’s longstanding principles — that you can’t legitimately call yourself an economic conservative if you aren’t also a social conservative. The morning consisted of speeches on “conservative policy... MORE >
Isabel Carter-Kahn, Monday 10/26/2015, 4:45pm
Paul Ryan is the latest in a stream of Republicans to aim for the position of speaker of the House after John Boehner announced his plan to step down last month. The House Freedom Caucus, the far-right group of members with Tea Party ties, was at first reluctant to back Ryan, and is even now catching criticism from conservatives who believe Ryan is not conservative enough to represent far-right values as speaker. The fact that Ryan is now seen as a “moderate” in the Republican party shows just how far to the right the party has moved. Ryan has courted the far-right for years. He... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 10/22/2015, 5:25pm
Sarah Posner @ Washington Post: Five women sue Bill Gothard’s ministry that has ties to the Duggars.  Catherine Thompson @ TPM: Clinton To GOPer: I'm Sorry My Facts Don't 'Fit Your Narrative' On Benghazi.  Thomas E. Ricks @ Foreign Policy: The 6 biggest points of bullshit being peddled about Benghazi. Adele Stan @ AlterNet: Sorry, Paul Ryan is Far From 'Reasonable'.  Kevin McDermott @ Political Fix: How to lose Iowa in one easy tweet. RH Reality Check: The Right’s Answer to Gutting Planned Parenthood?... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 03/12/2014, 5:34pm
Ben Dimiero & Eric Hananoki @ Media Matters: Notorious Smear Merchants Launch Super PAC. John M. Becker @ Bilerico Report: Brewer's Staff Helped Write Anti-LGBT Bill She Vetoed. Igor Volsky @ Think Progress: Paul Ryan Blames Poverty On Lazy ‘Inner City’ Men. Michelangelo Signorile @ Huffington Post: How the National Organization for Marriage Was Banished to the Basement at CPAC 2014. Hemant Mehta @ Friendly Atheist: About That ‘Common Core’ Math Problem Making the Rounds on Facebook… David Ferguson @ Raw Story: ‘Ex-gay... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 03/06/2014, 6:33pm
David Edwards @ Raw Story: Paul Ryan at CPAC: Free school lunches mean poor parents don’t care about kids. Warren Throckmorton: The Signed Contract That Helped Get Mark Driscoll’s Real Marriage on the New York Times Best Seller List. Andy Kroll @ Mother Jones: CPAC: How the IRS Scandal is Just Like Russia Invading Ukraine. Andy Towle @ Towleroad: Anti-Gay GOP Chair Who Attacked and Sued Houston Mayor Annise Parker Loses Re-Election Bid. Timothy Johnson @ Media Matters: NRA Official At CPAC: Healthcare Reform Part Of Obama Plot To "Destroy The Family"... MORE >