Mormonism

Glenn Beck Is Very Receptive To The Idea That Jesus Was Married To Mary Magdalene: 'You Could Talk Me Into That'

A few months ago, Glenn Beck was invited to speak at Liberty University where, in addition to presenting himself as a prophet of God, he set off a bit of controversy by preaching Mormon theology from the stage while repeatedly insisting that Mormonism is simply a "different denomination" of Christianity.

The claim that Mormonism is simply another branch of Christianity predictably did not sit well with various Religious Right activists who criticized Liberty University for allowing Beck to come and preach this doctrine at the school, which prompted Beck to lash out in response, accusing these critics of "standing for hate and bigotry."

One of Beck's most loyal defenders within the Religious Right movement is David Barton, who regularly seeks to assure those concerned about Beck's Mormonism, especially as it pertains to his increasing influence as a religious leader within the movement, by claiming that Beck is really just a Mormon in name only, insisting that Beck is simply a Mormon only out of loyalty and is actually a Christian when it comes to all of the things that really matter.

Barton was among those who went down to the southern border with Beck last weekend to deliver supplies to churches who are providing assistance in response to the border crisis and was on Beck's radio program yesterday, where the two discussed the trip. Beck said that he believes "miracles" are occurring because of these sorts of efforts, resulting in leaders from Christian denominations being willing to put aside their specific "religion" in order to focus more on their shared Christian "faith."

"Now, I'm seeing people get together," Beck said, "and they're not abandoning their theology but what they're doing is they're saying 'my religion comes second to my faith in God ... My faith and what the Lord tells me to do comes first.'"

This effort on Beck's part to continually assure others in the Religious Right movement that Mormonism is simply a "different denomination" of the Christian faith probably took a bit of a blow later in the program when he and his co-hosts were discussing a recent poll examining how many Americans believe in various conspiracy theories that eventually evolved into a conversation about what beliefs they hold that others might dismiss as conspiracy theories.

During the discussion, Beck's co-host Pat Gray asserted that he "absolutely believes" that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. Gray, like Beck, is also a Mormon and this belief, while not being official LDS doctrine, is a common one among Mormons, and it is one that Beck likewise appears to share.

"You could talk me into that," Beck said, arguing that it was simply impossible for Mary Magdalene to have been traveling closely with Jesus and his disciples unless she had been married to him.

"It just wouldn't have happened," he said. "A bunch of guys traveling around with a women? Unmarried? I don't think so":

Utah Man Starving Himself To Stop Same-Sex Marriages

Right-wing advocates of “nullification” say it is a principle by which state and county officials can simply ignore federal laws and court rulings they consider unconstitutional.  A Utah man who believes a federal judge acted unconstitutionally in ordering officials to permit same-sex marriage in the state has been fasting since December 21, he says, and will keep doing so until state officials refuse to obey the federal judge.  He invokes the founding fathers in his call for nullification.

In an interview posted today on the Cultural Hall website, Meacham said it is “completely pointless” for state officials to go through the courts because they are “packed full of activist judges that don’t listen to the constitution.” He has urged state officials and county clerks to defy the order. He told an interviewer he is emulating Gandhi, and said he is willing to sacrifice his life for the cause.

Trestin Meacham is a libertarian-leaning Navy veteran who ran for the state senate in 2012 as a candidate for the far-right Constitution Party, which promotes biblical law. His online bio from Project Vote Smart doesn’t have much more information other than that he is a small business owner and Mormon, while his personal Facebook page describes his politics as “Anti-Marxist Secessionist.” (It lists joking pop culture references for his work and education.)

As a candidate he was described as a conservative blogger, though some of his blogs appear to be defunct. In his writings and postings he has demonstrated a commitment to the Tea Party’s notion that much of what the federal government does violates the Tenth Amendment. As a candidate, he argued:

For over a hundred years we have been drifting further and further from the government designed by our founders, to something more closely resembling the writings of Karl Marx …

It is the duty of the State Legislatures to stand up to the federal government and take back our God-given right of self-government laid out in the Constitution. Washington is not going to reform itself. Even if we had Ronald Reagan as President, with control of both houses of Congress, it would still be heading down the wrong path. Washington is too corrupt; it will not relinquish its unconstitutional power. Reform can only come from an outside source, that source is the states.

As a State Senator, I will oppose any further unconstitutional power grabs from Washington. I will also sponsor and support legislation, which takes back the states rightful power from our corrupt federal government.

Meacham claims federal courts decisions on gay marriage will lead to tyranny, ultimately forcing churches and LDS to officiate same-sex weddings:

I think an attack on freedom, an attack on the Constitution, affects everybody.  If a fed judge can throw out the Constitution and the will of the people then we’re really little better off than a Soviet satellite nation. Our freedom means nothing. They can do anything if they can do this.

In a 2011 comment on a story on Glenn Beck’s The Blaze, he wrote, “Our schools have always been places for socialist indoctrinations. The public school system is the tenth plank of the Communist Manifesto.” An old YouTube channel apparently created while he was serving in Korea includes birther material.

Meacham has linked to right-wing sources online promoting nullification. In today’s interview he also appealed to the founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, quoting Joseph Smith saying that saints should not follow any law that violates the Constitution.

Meacham has a blog devoted to his fast / hunger strike as well as Facebook and Twitter accounts.

The blog Meacham created to promote his fast appears to be built on the same platform as a fictional country, Kherutistan, that Meacham seems to be constructing online, complete with its own Declaration of Independence and flag. Kherutistan is a libertarian paradise, a “heroarchy” led by people of good character where the basic ground rule of living is for people to be excellent to one another.

Pat Robertson's 700 Club Can't Decide If Mormons Are Christian Or Not

Last year, Pat Robertson not only claimed that God revealed to him that Mitt Romney would win the 2012 election and be a successful two-term president, but also hailed the high-profile Mormon as an “outstanding Christian.”

Even though Robertson, who also appeared at a rally with the failed presidential candidate, called Romney a Christian, his own Christian Broadcasting Network lists Mormonism as a non-Christian cult.

In fact, today on the 700 Club, Robertson’s co-host Terry Meeuwsen interviewed an ex-Mormon about the differences between her former faith and Christianity.

Robertson, of course, wouldn’t be the only Religious Right figure to equivocate on Mormonism in the service of larger political goals.

For example, many Religious Right activists who have denounced Mormonism also claim that Glenn Beck is a Christian who really isn’t really a Mormon.

Kirk Cameron even began his movie about God’s role in American history by interviewing Beck, even though Cameron once made an entire documentary attacking Mormons, warning that they will “end up in Hell forever.”

Barton: Glenn Beck Is A Christian Who Identifies As Mormon Simply Out Of Loyalty

It has been no secret that there have been some among the Religious Right who have raised concerns about the prominent role that Glenn Beck has been playing within the movement because he is a practitioner of the Mormon faith.  And given David Barton's close ties to Beck, Barton has also received criticism for defending Beck, often by claiming that if you judge Beck simply by the "fruits" of his works and not his label, he is really a Christian.

While Beck himself openly embraces his Mormon faith and has even dedicated entire programs to defending it, Barton continues to insist that Beck is really just a Mormon in name only, and he only does that because he has a loyalty to the church for helping him overcome with problems with alcohol.

As Barton explained to Steve Deace last week, individual Mormons can go to Heaven and Beck really "became a Christian back when he was in Alcoholics Anonymous" but identifies as a Mormon today only "because he has a loyalty to them":

They see the label Mormon and they say "ah, I know what that is." No you don't.  To say a Mormon can't go to Heaven is like saying every Baptist is going to Heaven. What you have to look at is individuals. And individuals often don't believe what the rest of the of the group does.

Now, in the case of Glenn - and I'm not going to speak for Glenn, I'll just speak for what I know about him - Glenn became a Christian back when he was in Alcoholics Anonymous, but when he was up in New England and laying on the floor, curled up, trying to get withdrawal from drugs and alcohol, no Christians reach out to him; it was the Mormon Church that took him under its arm and said 'hey, let us help you.' And they just loved on him and they just held him and he's got a loyalty to them because they're the people who reached out for him when he really needed help.

So people get stuck over what the label is and my position has been very simple; if I walk up to a tree and it says I'm a banana tree but I keep seeing apples, what do I go by? The label or what I see of the fruit?

And so people again keep getting caught up over labels, but hey, back off the labels, judge the fruit.  And there's going to be things we disagree with and I think you analysis was good is that it's in development.  You know, you look at where he was three years ago and where he is now; a world of difference.

Glenn Beck Is Luring Christians Into Islamo-Mormon Deistic Universalism

Yesterday's TruNews radio broadcast with Rick Wiles was entirely dedicated to an interview with right-wing anti-Islam activist Walid Shoebat and his son Theodore during which the three of them attacked ... Glenn Beck!

That's right, according to the Shoebats, Beck is a practitioner of "Chrislam," meaning that he is luring his audience away from true Christianity and into a dangerous Islamo-Mormon deistic universalism with the help of Religious Right leaders such as James Robison, Franklin Graham, and David Barton.

As Theodore explained, Joseph Smith, the founder of the Church of Latter-Day Saints, considered himself to be a second Muhammad, which is why, Walid said, LDS members will not proselytize to Muslims since "basically they have the same faith":

Walid Shoebat: Glenn Beck isn't really calling for Christianity. He lies when he says 'I'm a Christian, I believe in salvation through Jesus Christ' because he, number one, denies the Trinity; number two, he's a deist. In other words, he believes Muslims and Mormons and all the cults together, Buddhists,  believe in God and everybody should conform to this deistic view in belief in God.  Why? Because we have a more important thing to deal with and that is the salvation of the country as a nation.

Theodore Shoebat: Why is Glenn Beck so fascinated with universalism? Why does he keep pushing universalism? Because it is part of his religion.  People need to understand this about Mormonism.  Mormonism is an extreme version of Chrislam.  Joseph Smith observed the most extreme form of Islam you could ever imagine.  In 1855, the earliest leaders of Mormonism, of the Latter-Day Saints, got together specifically to exalt  the Prophet Muhammad.  Joseph Smith stated that Muhammad was a prophet of god and that Muhammad suffered just as I have suffered; he paralleled himself to Muhammad.  And in a very famous speech he made, the speech called 'Al-Koran or The Sword,' Joseph Smith stated 'in this generation, I will be the second Muhammad. Where it was in his generation the Koran or the sword,  it will be in this generation Joseph Smith or the sword.'

Walid Shoebat: The Latter-Day Saints church has sought to respect Islamic laws, that is sharia - that's the thing that Glenn Beck claims to be fighting - and traditions that prohibit conversions of Muslims to other faiths by adopting a policy of non-proselytizing in Islamic countries in the Middle East.  In other words, Mormons are not allowed to proselytize to Muslims in the Middle East.  Why? Because basically they have the same faith.

Religious Right Leader: Vote Romney Because Mormons Believe US Constitution is Biblical Truth

As RWW has noted, most Religious Right leaders have cast aside whatever reservations they once had about voting for Mitt Romney, whose Mormonism many do not consider a Christian faith.  Sure, they’d rather have a conservative evangelical or right-wing Catholic as the GOP nominee, but they lost that chance in the primaries.  And they are so eager to defeat Barack Obama, and avoid the divine wrath that his re-election would provoke, that they have circled the wagons around Romney.

In September, more than two dozen Religious Right leaders wrote a letter dismissing differences over doctrine, praising the Republican platform, and saying “it is time to remind ourselves that civil government is not about a particular theology but rather about public policy." Long past time, some might say.
 
Marc Nuttle, a board member of the dominionist Oak Initiative and regular speaker at the Freedom Federation’s Awakening conferences, goes one better. Rather than telling evangelicals they should vote for Romney in spite of his Mormonism, he essentially says in a recent Oak Initiative bulletin that people should vote for Romney because of the Mormon faith’s incorporation of the US Constitution into a particularly potent form of American exceptionalism:
 
Governor Romney has been criticized by some for being a Mormon.  I find this curious given the fact that little criticism has been given to the President who belonged to a church headed by a pastor who condemned the United States of America.  
 
The Mormon Church is the only religion that has canonized the Constitution of the United States as biblical truth.  The scripture in point is Doctrine and Covenants, Section 101, Verses 77-80.  In verse 80 the Lord is speaking, “And for this purpose have I established the Constitution of this land, by the hands of wise men whom I raised up unto this very purpose, and redeemed the land by the shedding of blood.”
 
Mormons believe the principles within the Constitution are eternal principles given to us from God Himself for the benefit of all mankind.  They support the Constitution, they revere it, and they will defend it with all their strength.  It is fundamental to their belief.
 
If you are an evangelical and concerned about the federalization of moral values without consideration of the 9th or 10th Amendment, if you are a small business owner concerned about unfair taxes from a big business viewpoint, if you are a community banker concerned about onerous regulations based upon the concept of “big banks are too big to fail,” if you are worried about federal judges who legislate from the bench and do not respect the Constitution or state laws, then Governor Romney is the answer for your security.

We're 'Asking for God's Judgment on Our Country': An Exercise in Hypocrisy

It is no secret that, for all of the talk of deeply held principles and stalwart Christian convictions, most Religious Right leaders are Republican Party cheerleaders who will eventually back the GOP presidential nominee, regardless of every declaration to the contrary they may have made in the past.  

This fact was perfectly demonstrated back in 2008, when James Dobson spent the entire Republican primary telling everyone who would listen that "I cannot, and I will not, vote for Sen. John McCain, as a matter of conscience" only to declare shortly before the election that "I am now supportive of Senator John McCain and his bid for the presidency." 

Similarly, back during that 2008 primary, Robert Jeffress, who has never been shy about calling Mormonism a "cult," warned that Republicans could not nominate someone like Mitt Romney because "God always judges a nation that has a ruler who introduces false gods into that national life":

But yesterday, Jeffress was on with Bryan Fischer where he declared that America was engaged in "high-handed sins" and warned that failing to elect Romney would be "asking for God's judgment on our country": 

Just to clarify: Jeffress once believed that electing a Mormon like Mitt Romney would cause God to judge this nation, but then Romney became the GOP nominee, at which point Jeffress decided that not electing Romney will cause God to judge this nation.

Jeffress: 'Cult' Member Romney Still Better than Obama, who has his 'Fist in the Face of God'

After Mitt Romney secure the Republican nomination, prominent Southern Baptist pastor Robert Jeffress has said that Christians should vote for the Mormon candidate over President Obama since he “espouses unbiblical principles.” Such a sentiment is striking since Jeffress attacked Romney’s Mormon faith in the 2008 and 2012 primary elections, hoping that the GOP would nominate an evangelical Christian like Rick Perry over Romney as Mormonism is “a heresy from the pit of Hell.” Now, Jeffress is rallying evangelical support for Romney, despite his prior warning that electing a Mormon will lead to God’s judgment.

Jeffress told Janet Mefferd, who has also criticized Romney over his faith, that it is still better to vote for Romney, even though he is a member of a “cult” and “false religion” that believes in a “multiplicity of gods,” than Obama because of his stances on marriage equality and abortion rights. The pastor said defeating Obama is even worth potentially giving Mormon missionaries a tool to bolster “legitimacy of their faith” and make more converts.

I still think there are concerns out there among evangelicals about voting for a Mormon. I’ve made peace with it; the way I’ve made peace with it is to make it very clear on programs like yours that Mormonism is a cult, it is a false religion, Mormons worship a multiplicity of gods, they deny the Bible, in fact they think the Bible is so error-filled there had to be a second book of revelations. I want to make it very clear that I don’t believe Mormonism is Christianity but I do think that in this case it is better to vote for a non-Christian who supports biblical principles like life and marriage than voting for a professing Christian like Barack Obama who absolutely repudiates what Jesus Christ said about some key issues.



I don’t want to minimize the Mormonism issue. I had probably the most well-known pastor in America say to me last week; you know one concern is the mission implications of this, Mormons are so involved in missions overseas, they’ll be able to point to a Mormon president as legitimacy of their faith. So I think we need to be clear that Mormonism is a false religion that leads people away from rather than toward the true God, but having said that we are making this choice in spite of that.

He warned that America is “about to go over the moral and spiritual cliff from which there is no return” if Obama is re-elected, asserting that his administration is “openly involved in high-handed sins” and shaking its “fist in the face of God” on matters like same-sex marriage.

You know in the Old Testament the Bible had what it called high-handed sins, sins that were like a clenched fist in the face of God. We are now seeing an administration that is openly involved in high-handed sins: the embracing of gay marriage. A friend of mine said to me recently, ‘think about this just ten years ago if a pastor or a sandwich company were to say marriage is between a husband and a wife, a man and a woman, no one would have batted an eye at that, but today that is labeled as hate speech,’ now what has changed? It’s not the Bible or the message that has changed, it shows what has happened in our culture. I know this sounds alarmist but I believe we are at the precipice, we are at a tipping point in our country right now, we are about to go over not the fiscal cliff, we are about to go over the moral and spiritual cliff from which there is no return, and that is why it is imperative for Christians to get out and vote in this election.

Right Wing Leftovers - 10/16/12

  • Shortly after Mitt Romney met with Billy and Franklin Graham, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association scrubbed its website of language calling Mormonism a cult.
  • When you go to vote, just "choose the politicians who line up with the majority of [the] things that God hates."
  • The Weekly Standard profiles Randall Terry while Samuel L. Jackson threatens to sue him.
  • Mat Staver says it is perfectly obvious that "the Constitution does not protect abortion or homosexuality."
  • Finally, the Anti-Defamation League has condemned Peter LaBarbera and Judith Reisman for claiming that gay activists are demonizing Christians "like the Nazis used to do to the Jews."

Steve Deace Just Can't Understand Why People Call Him an Anti-Mormon Bigot

As we have noted several times before, Religious Right radio show host Steve Deace has made a habit of inviting openly anti-Mormon activists onto his program to make the case that Christians cannot vote for Mitt Romney purely because of his faith.

Last night, Deace interviewed Stephen Mansfield, author of the forthcoming book "The Mormonizing of America: How the Mormon Religion Became Became a Dominant Force in Politics, Entertainment, and Pop Culture" to discuss the issue of Romey's Mormonism once again, during which Deace complained that whenever he criticizes Romney, he gets accused of being an anti-Mormon bigot.

Of course, Deace is not being accused of anti-Mormonism because he is criticizing Romney's inconsistent record or history of flip-flops but rather because he frequently offers air time to people who liken voting for Romney to voting for Satan. And, in fact, during the discussion with Mansfield, Deace openly wondered how voters can justify supporting candidates just because they might be good on some issues despite that fact they also "believe things that are so crazy" like Mormonism: 

What I have found is, you know, I can vet every other Republican candidate running for president the last two cycles, I can vet their record. I can talk about I don't like Rick Santorum's endorsement of Arlen Specter and nobody calls me an anti-Catholic bigot. I can vet the record of every other Republican running for ... I can vet Rudy Giuliani's record and nobody calls me a bigot against agnostics. But if I vet Mitt Romney's record, I'm a religious bigot and this continues on to this day.

...

At some level, when people believe things that are so crazy, does that cancel out where they're at on anything else?

When Deace was "vetting" the other GOP candidates, he never explicitly attacked any of them for their faith, yet he does exactly that to Romney on a regular basis.  So if Deace doesn't like being called an anti-Mormon bigot, perhaps he ought to stop offering air time to (and agreeing with) anti-Mormon activists.

Anti-Mormon Activist Asks if Christians Would Vote for a Member of the First Church of Satan

Earlier this week we wrote a post about Jerry Johnson and his role in formulating a document calling on Christian leaders who decide to back Mitt Romney to also make clear that Mormonism is a cult. As Johnson explained, he personally will not be voting for either President Obama or Mitt Romney because that is like having to choose between "voting for the Beast or the False Prophet."

Of course, if there is some Christian activist out there urging Christian voters not to support Mitt Romney because of his Mormon faith, it is only a matter of time before they are invited to make their case on Steve Deace's radio program ... just as Johnson was last night.

Johnson made the case that Christians are misinformed about the true nature of Mormonism, thanks to people like David Barton who is "hugging and kissing all over Glenn Beck," and asked whether Christians would be willing to vote for a member of the First Church of Satan if the candidate supported the conservative agenda, warning that the "anybody but Obama" mindset was going to drive the nation and the church "into the arms of perdition" and prevent God from blessing America:

55% of evangelicals either don't know what Mormonism teaches or they don't know that Christianity teaches. And that is our failure, that is the great calamity that we're facing right now thanks to people like Joel Olsteen and Rick Warren and David Barton, who is hugging and kissing all over Glenn Beck, calling him his brother in Christ.

Suppose you had a real conservative running again Barack Obama ... who was fiscally conservative, he believed in the right to keep and bear arms, all the things that conservatives hold to. But let's say he was a member of the First Church of Satan. Would his religion now make a difference? Would you be out endorsing and campaigning for him if he was a member of the Satanic Church?

Right now the attitude is in the country, or specifically within the Republican Party, anybody but Obama. And this idea, this mindset is going to drive, I believe, this country and even the church into the arms of perdition in many ways.

The issue is the blessings and curse of God. He is the one who is sovereign, dread sovereign, over all the universe. And we are reaping today the curses of God, I believe, in this country. So here's my question, I ask folks: do we really believe that God is going to bless America if we elect a professed polytheist to the highest office of the land?

Anti-Mormon Activist Warns Romney and Obama Represent 'Twin Evils'

Last month we noted that many Religious Right leaders have tried to rationalize their fundamentalist version of Christianity with voting for a Mormon candidate for president by arguing that it isn’t a problem since Romney supports “biblical values” and Obama, they allege, does not. Others, such as televangelist Joel Osteen and Pat Robertson, and activists like David Barton, have gone so far as to say that Mormons are indeed Christians.

Now, a group of pastors has released a document, For the Sake of the Gospel, saying that if Christian leaders decide to back Mitt Romney, they must clearly distinguish the theological differences between Mormonism and Christianity:

If an evangelical Christian chooses to vote for Mr. Romney (President Obama or any candidate), that is a decision between themselves and God.

The purpose of this call to evangelical Christians and leaders is two-fold:

1. To protect the purity and integrity of the Biblical Gospel.

2. To seize the opportunity to educate the America Public and Christians to the fundamental differences between historic Christian faith and that of the Latter-day Saints (Mormons).



It is our contention that the general population should not be left with any uncertainty whether the theological cult1 of which Mitt Romney is a faithful member, namely The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and historic evangelical Christianity are one and the same faith. This we adamantly deny!

Jerry Johnson of the Nicene Council spoke to Janet Mefferd yesterday about the document and like others such as Warren Cole Smith of World Magazine, cautioned that electing a Mormon president would give the church a powerful tool in their mission work and warned against pastors describing Romney as a Christian. He told Mefferd that he would not vote for either Romney or Obama, lamenting that “the two major parties have given us the choice between voting for the Beast or the False Prophet” and calling the two candidates “twin evils.”

Johnson: Why can’t the Christian Church understand that this election cycle goes beyond Mitt Romney, beyond Barack Obama, even beyond the United States of America, it has to be about the Gospel. Too many Christians are just willing to either rationalize like Pat Robertson and Joel Osteen, they’re willing to rationalize and become very pragmatic, and it appears, I don’t know if they realize they’re doing this, but my question to them would be: what’s more important, the United States of America and its Constitution or the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ?

Mefferd: Well that’s a no-brainer right there, yet you have a lot of Christians who say ‘we have to endorse Romney, we have to get behind Romney, or we’ll get Obama for a second term,’ what do you say to those Christians?

Johnson: I say to them that in this election cycle the two major parties have given us the choice between voting for the Beast or the False Prophet. I for one, I’m not going to vote for either. This is not an issue of the lesser of two evils; I actually see two twin evils here.

Johnson also posted a video outlining “why Mormonism is a cult”:

The Fischer Defense: 'I am not Anti-Mormon, I am Anti-Mormonism'

Bryan Fischer has a long history of criticizing Mormonism, saying that it is not protected by the First Amendment and warning that electing a "spiritually-compromised candidate" like Mitt Romney will weaken the nation and threatens its spiritual health.

But on his radio program on Friday, Fischer took a moment to make clear that he doesn't hate Mormons ... he just hates Mormonism:

Now I want to say this again, I am not anti-Mormon. I am anti-Mormonism because I think it's error, but I am pro-Mormon. I am for Mormons, I want to see them come to a full understanding of the truth. I bear them no ill will, I bear them no malice, I love them, I want them to come into the full light of the truth.

We should probably point out that this is the exact same defense that Fischer uses to justify his attacks on gays and Muslims:

Obviously Mormons must be greatly relieved to learn that Fischer is not anti-Mormon but merely anti-Mormonism ... just like he is not anti-gay but merely anti-homosexuality and not anti-Muslim but rather anti-Islam. 

Especially since Fischer "loves" gays so much that holds the responsible for the Holocaust, likened them to domestic terrorists and Nazis who are intent on committing “ virtual genocide” against the military, asserts that "homosexuals should be disqualified from public office" and called for the re-criminalization of homosexuality

And he "loves" Muslims so much that he has stated they have no First Amendment rights, that they should be banned from serving in the military as well as from building mosques in the U.S., and that they are inherently stupid as a result of inbreeding.

Former Santorum Florida Campaign Co-Chair Says Romney Will 'Taint the Republican Party' with Mormonism

Back in January, Rick Santorum kicked off his Florida campaign by speaking at Florida’s Worldwide Christian Center, whose pastor, Rev. O’Neal Dozier, is a fervently anti-gay and anti-Muslim activist with close ties to leading Republican officials across the state, and co-chaired Santorum’s Florida campaign. During the Florida campaign and even after Romney all but locked up the party’s nomination, Dozier has consistently warned that his nomination would jeopardize the future of the GOP with black voters because according to Dozier, who is African American, “blacks are not going to vote for anyone of the Mormon faith.” Dozier even went so far as to write a letter to Southern Baptist leader Richard Land urging him to press Romney to explicitly “renounce” past Mormon doctrines on race. While speaking yesterday with conservative talk show host Steve Deace, who has hosted anti-Mormon activists before, Dozier appeared to be using a Bryan Fischer-like tactic of stoking anti-Mormon animosity but under the guise of insinuating that Democrats are to blame for attacks on his religion, accusing the left of potentially making Romney’s faith an issue in the future.

I don’t know whether people understand this or not but the Mormon religion believes that the Negros were cursed, that they were cursed in the pre-existence because of something they did in the pre-existence and in this life they are cursed, they are cursed with black skin, a flat nose and big lips. They believe this, this is written all through their doctrine, it’s in there, it’s in the Mormon book and it’s also in the Journal of Discourses, Brigham Young is one of the main ones who said these things and other prophets that they have had. I tell you, listen to me very, very carefully, when Mitt Romney is fully vetted by the Democratic Party, I don’t think a black person, a Jewish person, I don’t think any minorities will want to come nowhere next to him.



Here’s my fear, Mitt Romney being the face and the leader now of the Republican Party. What does that do to the Republican Party? Number one, it will taint the Republican Party. And a nomination of Mitt Romney will widen the racial divide in this country.

The Games Bryan Fischer Plays

Last year, Bryan Fischer openly declared that Mitt Romney's Mormon faith "ought to be an issue in 2012" and that Romney should be forced to publicly declare whether he embraces Mormon teachings that conflict with the Bible so that voters can decide "whether they want somebody with those convictions sitting in the Oval Office."

Since then, Fischer has repeatedly attacked Romney over his faith, calling him a "spiritually-compromised candidate" and declaring  that a Mormon president represents a threat to the "spiritual health" of the nation.

But Fischer has also realized that openly attacking Romney's faith in this manner might be problematic even at the American Family Association, so he has settled upon a trick whereby he continues to do so while pretending that is really the media which is attacking Romney's Mormon faith.

Fischer announced this trick a few months ago when wrote a piece claiming that if Romney became the Republican nominee, "the winger-left media" would not hesitate to highlight "the more unusual aspects of Mormon theology."  And he has been using this framing ever since as he launches repeated attacks upon Mormonism while thinking he is avoiding responsibility simply because he is pretending that it is the media that is really attacking Romney's faith.

Yesterday, while discussing Hilary Rosen's comment about Ann Romney, Fischer demonstrated exactly how he does it, using the flap as cover to engage in a long attack on Mormon theology while saying that the media needs to ask Mitt and Ann Romney about it because the media once asked Michele Bachmann about her theology:

So, based on nothing more than a random comment made about Ann Romney, Fischer is now demanding that the Romney's publicly address the specific tenets of their faith ... while blaming it all on the media.

As we have said before, if Fischer actually thinks that he is fooling anyone with this pathetic charade, he is even less self-aware than we ever could have imagined.

Anti-Mormon Activist Warns 'We Cannot Afford a Mormon Experiment' with Romney

Now that Rick Santorum has dropped out and Newt Gingrich is merely going through the motions, it is all but inevitable that Mitt Romney is going to secure the Republican presidential nomination.  As such, Religious Right leaders have seen the handwriting on the wall and begun lining up to support him.

But not everyone is willing to do so, partially because of Romney's long history of changing his political principles to win office, but also because of his Mormon faith.  As Bryan Fischer made clear yesterday, there is a not insignificant percentage of the Religious Right base that simply will not vote for a "spiritually compromised candidate" like Romney

Similarly, Steve Deace is an influential right-wing radio host in Iowa who endorsed Newt Gingrich but is now struggling with the prospect of having to support Romney.  And while Deace appears to be willing to at least entertain the idea of voting for Romney out of necessity simply because of the issue of Israel, he is equally willing to give air time to vehement anti-Mormon critics like Tricia Erickson to make the case on his program that being a Mormon in and of itself demonstrates that Romney's judgement cannot be trusted:

I think that the leader of the free world, especially in the times that we're in today, we cannot afford a Mormon experiment. We have to have someone at the head of our country with sound judgment. If this man does not have the judgment to be able to discern fact from fiction on the most basic things like the horrifically false religion that he's in. If he doesn't have the wherewithal to understand that he has lived a lie all of his life and continues the lie, then how do we trust the judgment of this man to put him at the head of our country with everything that's going on? I mean, if he cannot even figure out fact from fiction in the way that he's been raised, how can we trust his judgement at the head of our nation?

From Beck to Romney, Religious Right Comes to Terms with Mormon Leaders

Last year evangelical writer and WORLD Magazine associate publisher Warren Cole Smith created quite a stir with his column pledging not to vote for Mitt Romney if he wins the Republican nomination because of the boost his presidency would provide to Mormonism. “You can't say that his religious beliefs don't matter, but his ‘values’ do,” Smith explained, “If the beliefs are false, then the behavior will eventually—but inevitably—be warped.” He pointed to the Mormon doctrine of “continuing revelation” to explain Romney’s history of flip-flops and warned that a Romney presidency “would serve to normalize the false teachings of Mormonism the world over,” drawing more people into the LDS church and away from orthodox Christianity.

But it seems that few other prominent faces of the Religious Right are agreeing with Smith’s stance.

Televangelist James Robison on Daystar told a listener that she should favor a non-Christian over a Christian just as people favored Ronald Reagan, a Hollywood actor, over Jimmy Carter, a Southern Baptist Sunday school teacher, because Reagan better understood biblical principles:

Even Robert Jeffress, the preacher who attacked Mormonism as a “cult” at the Values Voters Summit and said Christians should prefer evangelical Rick Perry over Romney, made a similar case on Janet Parshall’s radio show in January when he said a “non-Christian who embraces biblical principles” is preferable to “a professing Christian who espouses unbiblical principles”:

American Family Association spokesman Bryan Fischer said he will vote for Romney even though he believes a Mormon president would undermine the “spiritual health” of the U.S., and Rick Scarborough of Vision America, repeated his antipathy towards Mormonism in an interview but made clear that “if the choice comes down for me between a Mormon and Barack Obama, I’d vote for the Mormon every time.”

But the acceptance of Romney as the leader of the GOP by the Religious Right’s leadership may not come as a great surprise, as the same people have largely embraced another high profile Mormon, Glenn Beck.

Beck has become a favorite of Religious Right figures, leading his religiously-infused Restoring Honor rally at the Lincoln Memorial and introducing his clerical Black Robe Regiment, promulgating ‘Christian nation’ history with David Barton and keynoting last year’s Values Voters Summit.

The turnaround when it comes to working with Mormons, who many evangelicals see as “cobelligerents” in the culture wars along with conservative Roman Catholics and Jews, can be seen in Kirk Cameron’s own about-face.

Cameron featured Beck at the kickoff event for his movie Monumental, about how America needs to return to its theocratic Pilgrim roots, where Beck told Cameron that God confirmed to him in prayer that what they are doing is right and wants them to warn the country about America’s impending collapse.

Beck’s appearance and discussion of his talks with God in Cameron’s Religious Right “documentary” may raise eyebrows since Cameron in 2006 co-hosted an anti-Mormon film with evangelist Ray Comfort. In the show, Cameron said that it was likely Satan who appeared to Joseph Smith, the Mormon prophet, as the Angel Moroni and led him to golden plates that became the Book of Mormon, and even said that Mormons are “following a false Jesus” and “will end up in Hell forever.” “If you’ve ever spoken to a Mormon, sometimes you know how frustrating it could when they use the same words you do but they mean something different and you’re not sure how to finish the conversation,” Cameron said.

Watch highlights of Cameron’s anti-Mormon film here:

Despite Cameron’s dogmatic warnings against Mormonism, he is now actively working with one of America’s leading Mormons. Similarly, just as many on the Religious Right once denounced the Mormon faith, they are now prepared to vote for Romney over President Obama.

Cass: Romney Must Renounce "Mormon Hostility to Christianity"

Gary Cass of the Christian Anti-Defamation Commission is an anti-gay, anti-Islam Religious Right activist who dedicates an inordinate amount of effort to attacking the faith of leaders like Barack Obama.

So it should come as no surprise that Cass is also anti-Mormon, as he is now saying that Mitt Romney's faith should be an important issue in evaluating "his fitness for office" and calling on Romney to "renounce the historic Mormon hostility to Christianity":

Mormonism has always been at odds with Christianity and openly denies the Trinity and the gospel of grace.

As a Bishop in the Mormon Church, Romney is free to believe its strange doctrines, practice their Masonic rituals, even wear their sacred underwear, but Romney's Mormon beliefs are not Christian.

Historically Mormons have hated and insulted Christians beginning with its founder, the polygamous Joseph Smith who said he wanted to be the Mohammed of the Americas.

Romney hopes Christians fall for the lie they believe the same things we do.

Mitt Romney, Presidential candidate and Mormon Bishop, in his 2007 speech regarding his Mormon faith sounded conciliatory towards other faiths. But his position is not consistent with the Mormon beliefs he adamantly affirmed in whole and from which he refused to distance himself. The Mormon faith has, from its inception, attacked all other religions, especially orthodox Christianity.

Romney's Mormon beliefs are not Christian. Mormonism's antipathy toward Christianity should not be so quickly forgotten. This is an important aspect of any evaluation the American voters make regarding his fitness for office.

If Romney wants the Christian vote, more than the Mormon dollars supporting his campaign, he must demonstrate real respect, not rhetoric. If he does not renounce the historic Mormon hostility to Christianity, then we must conclude that he agrees with his church's defamation of the past.

VCY America Spreads Fear of Mormon 'Overthrow of the United States Government'

We keep hearing from conservative activists that progressives are fueling anti-Mormon sentiments, even though attacks on the Mormon faith mainly come from the Religious Right. Today on Voice of Christian Youth America’s Crosstalk, Jim Schneider hosted Tricia Erickson, a former Mormon and author of Can Mitt Romney Serve Two Masters: The Mormon Church versus the Office of The Presidency of The United States of America.

Erickson has previously appeared on other conservative Christian radio programs including Focal Point with Bryan Fischer and The Steve Deace Show, and told Schneider that a Mormon president would be bound to the dictates of the Mormon prophet “even if those mandates go against our nation” and that Mormons are seeking the “millennial overthrow of the United States government.” Crosstalk is no stranger to promoting anti-Mormon beliefs, as host Vic Eliason once warned listeners against supporting Mitt Romney because “we might have a president who would suddenly evacuate the White House and go to another planet and become a God!”

Schneider: Are you suggesting Tricia that if Mitt Romney is elected President of the United States that there is an allegiance to the Mormon Church that would supersede his oath to the United States or the Constitution of the United States?

Erickson: Absolutely…. As president of the United States, Mitt would have less authority than that of the living prophet of the Mormon Church, he is therefore no matter his position as leader of our nation subject to the prophet and to his orders and to his mandates, even if those mandates go against our nation.



Erickson: The political machinery of the priesthood of the Mormon Church is named the Kingdom of God and/or the Government of God, and the goal of the Mormon Church, through the Mormon Kingdom of God, is to bring the United States government, this is true, under the rule of the priesthood, the Mormon priesthood. Mormons believe that they are the only true church, all other religions are false, and their main objective is to be ready when the time comes for the millennial reign by having their leaders ready to rule or already in key places of authority and power. Their ultimate goal is better serve their agenda by being able to rule and govern before the millennium actually takes place and the Mormon Church and its corporate empire, assets and resources will be the chief element in the millennial overthrow of the United States government.

Fischer: A Mormon President Threatens the "Spiritual Health" of the Nation

Ever since Mitt Romney called out Bryan Fischer for his relentless bigotry at the Values Voter Summit, Fischer has been on a mission to ensure that Romney does not win the Republican nomination and has been increasingly willing to attack Romney's Mormon faith as part of this effort.

Yesterday, Fischer ramped it up a notch, declaring on his radio program that having a believer in a false religion in Mormonism inhabiting the White House would be a threat to the spiritual health of this nation:

[Mormonism] is not a Christian faith. It is, as Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Church in Dallas says, a false religion. So it's kind of a striking things and I know it concerns a number of spiritual leaders, and I count myself among them, is what this would mean for the spiritual health of the United States of America is a worshiper of a false god occupied the White House. You know, what that would mean for the spiritual future of America and what it might reveal about the spiritual weakness of America if the American people, particularly the so-called conservatives, the people of faith in America, would promote someone to the highest office in the land who is a follower of a counterfeit faith, a false religion.

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Mormonism Posts Archive

Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 07/23/2014, 4:02pm
A few months ago, Glenn Beck was invited to speak at Liberty University where, in addition to presenting himself as a prophet of God, he set off a bit of controversy by preaching Mormon theology from the stage while repeatedly insisting that Mormonism is simply a "different denomination" of Christianity. The claim that Mormonism is simply another branch of Christianity predictably did not sit well with various Religious Right activists who criticized Liberty University for allowing Beck to come and preach this doctrine at the school, which prompted Beck to lash out in response,... MORE
Peter Montgomery, Friday 01/03/2014, 5:06pm
Right-wing advocates of “nullification” say it is a principle by which state and county officials can simply ignore federal laws and court rulings they consider unconstitutional.  A Utah man who believes a federal judge acted unconstitutionally in ordering officials to permit same-sex marriage in the state has been fasting since December 21, he says, and will keep doing so until state officials refuse to obey the federal judge.  He invokes the founding fathers in his call for nullification. In an interview posted today on the Cultural Hall website, Meacham said it is... MORE
Brian Tashman, Thursday 08/22/2013, 1:20pm
Last year, Pat Robertson not only claimed that God revealed to him that Mitt Romney would win the 2012 election and be a successful two-term president, but also hailed the high-profile Mormon as an “outstanding Christian.” Even though Robertson, who also appeared at a rally with the failed presidential candidate, called Romney a Christian, his own Christian Broadcasting Network lists Mormonism as a non-Christian cult. In fact, today on the 700 Club, Robertson’s co-host Terry Meeuwsen interviewed an ex-Mormon about the differences between her former faith and Christianity... MORE
Kyle Mantyla, Tuesday 07/23/2013, 11:39am
It has been no secret that there have been some among the Religious Right who have raised concerns about the prominent role that Glenn Beck has been playing within the movement because he is a practitioner of the Mormon faith.  And given David Barton's close ties to Beck, Barton has also received criticism for defending Beck, often by claiming that if you judge Beck simply by the "fruits" of his works and not his label, he is really a Christian. While Beck himself openly embraces his Mormon faith and has even dedicated entire programs to defending it, Barton continues to... MORE
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 06/19/2013, 2:28pm
Yesterday's TruNews radio broadcast with Rick Wiles was entirely dedicated to an interview with right-wing anti-Islam activist Walid Shoebat and his son Theodore during which the three of them attacked ... Glenn Beck! That's right, according to the Shoebats, Beck is a practitioner of "Chrislam," meaning that he is luring his audience away from true Christianity and into a dangerous Islamo-Mormon deistic universalism with the help of Religious Right leaders such as James Robison, Franklin Graham, and David Barton. As Theodore explained, Joseph Smith, the founder of the Church... MORE
Peter Montgomery, Wednesday 10/31/2012, 4:41pm
As RWW has noted, most Religious Right leaders have cast aside whatever reservations they once had about voting for Mitt Romney, whose Mormonism many do not consider a Christian faith.  Sure, they’d rather have a conservative evangelical or right-wing Catholic as the GOP nominee, but they lost that chance in the primaries.  And they are so eager to defeat Barack Obama, and avoid the divine wrath that his re-election would provoke, that they have circled the wagons around Romney. In September, more than two dozen Religious Right leaders wrote a letter dismissing differences... MORE
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 10/25/2012, 10:35am
It is no secret that, for all of the talk of deeply held principles and stalwart Christian convictions, most Religious Right leaders are Republican Party cheerleaders who will eventually back the GOP presidential nominee, regardless of every declaration to the contrary they may have made in the past.   This fact was perfectly demonstrated back in 2008, when James Dobson spent the entire Republican primary telling everyone who would listen that "I cannot, and I will not, vote for Sen. John McCain, as a matter of conscience" only to declare shortly before the election that... MORE