Sandy Rios Pushes Myth that Health Care Reform Exempts Muslim-Americans

According to the American Family Association’s Sandy Rios, the 2010 health care reform law may be “the beginning of dhimmitude.” Rios, who spent much of her Friday radio program defending Michele Bachmann’s remarks on her show about Muslim Brotherhood “deep penetration” of the US government, warned that Muslims intend to “overpopulate and overtake” communities in order to establish “dhimmitude.” After discussing a tax that Christians and Jews could pay to receive protection and religious autonomy under Muslim rule, Rios claimed that the health care reform law “says that Muslims will be exempt from the government mandate to purchase insurance.”

Of course, this is not true.

According to FactCheck.org, the law does include religious exemptions for groups that are “currently considered exempt from Social Security payroll taxes,” such as the Amish, and “no Muslim group, and indeed no non-Christian group, has ever qualified for an exemption under the statue used to define exempt religious groups in the health care law.”

But by pushing such anti-Obama myths, Rios is simply doing what every other AFA radio host does on a daily basis.

Do you know what dhimmitude is? I wish I could see your hands. How many of you know what dhimmitude is? Dhimmitude is the system under Islam where Muslims go into communities and at first operate within a system and then overpopulate and overtake, and when they become the majority they begin to exercise dhimmitude, which means dhimmi, which means that everybody—the other—anybody that’s not Muslim will be subservient to them in terms of taxes that you would have to pay, taxes as non-Muslims in exchange for being allowed to live there with them, so that’s part of dhimmitude. I’ve heard this before but somebody just sent it to me again, on page 107 of the Obama health care bill it says that Muslims will be exempt from the government mandate to purchase insurance because they believe insurance is gambling and risk-taking, so they will not have to buy it but the rest of us will, and the accusation is that this is the beginning of dhimmitude.

Indeed, the only group arguing for a religious tax appears to be…the American Family Association, as AFA spokesman Bryan Fischer endorsed a tax on non-churchgoers:

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