Rep. Palazzo: DADT Repeal Proves Obama Doesn't 'Share The Same Christian Faith That We Do'

Rep. Steven Palazzo (R-MS) is coming to the defense of the Mississippi-based American Family Association after the organization was listed as a hate group in an Army training session, and is pointing figures at the White House. In an interview with the AFA’s OneNewsNow, Palazzo hailed the extremist AFA as a “great organization” and accused Obama of trying “to make America secular” and demonize Christians.

“Basically I don’t believe [President Obama] shares the same Christian faith that we do because he’s allowing his minions his political appointees to do this,” Palazzo told AFA correspondent Chad Groening. “I mean he’s repealed ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ in the military. It was a policy that was working.”

Apparently, being a Christian means embracing the views of the AFA, a group whose chief spokesman has called for gays to be criminalized like drug addicts and commended the massacre of Native Americans.

Congressman Steven Palazzo represents Mississippi's Fourth District, where Camp Shelby is located. He has sent a letter to Army Secretary John McHugh signed by fellow Mississippi Representatives Greg Harper and Alan Nunnellee, as well as Senators Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker.

During an interview with OneNewsNow, Palazzo – a 25-year military veteran – said there seems to be a pattern of attacks on religious liberty within the military.

"I do believe there's an agenda out to make America secular and to ridicule and demagogue great groups such as AFA, which is all about the family, all about Christian principles," said the congressman. "So we're not going to stand idly by and allow ... the Army or other groups to attack such a great organization."

The Mississippi native said voters need to understand that elections have consequences.

" ... Basically I don't believe [President Obama] shares the same Christian faith that we do because he's allowing his minions his political appointees to do this," he comments. "I mean he's repealed 'don't ask, don't tell' in the military. It was a policy that was working."