Mike Huckabee Says Todd Akin Was Attacked For Being A Christian

WorldNetDaily runs a glowing profile today of failed Senate candidate Todd Akin’s new book — which WND just so happens to be publishing — including plaudits from Mike Huckabee, Oliver North and WND editor Joseph Farah.

According to Huckabee, Akin was the victim of a conspiracy by Democrats, the media and “establishment Republicans” to silence good, decent, conservative Christians and take away their freedoms. Huckabee, who campaigned aggressively for Akin, tells WND that criticism of Akin was “destructive to the country we care so deeply about.”

Although Akin attempted to apologize for his infamous “legitimate rape” remark during his campaign, he now says that nothing he said was wrong and insists he was attacked for simply trying to promote biblical values in politics.

“Todd didn’t ask for a war with the party establishment, but he sure did get one,” he writes. “No one in American politics knows better than I do the immediate bias and attacks that come from liberals and the media establishment when Christians with sincere convictions make a move into the political arena. We’ve got to deal with their attacks and have even come to expect them. More shocking are the attacks on social conservatives from party bosses, partisan power brokers and the entrenched GOP establishment. I’m deeply offended by this infighting within the Republican Party, because it is so destructive to the country we care so deeply about.”



“I expected Democrats to pounce on Todd,” Huckabee says regarding the infamous “legitimate rape” interview on a local TV show. “But I was disheartened and outraged when Republicans circled the wagons – not to support Todd and help him overcome an obstacle but instead as a firing squad pointed at the congressman.”



Oliver North had this to say about Akin’s spirited defense of life that got him pilloried, first by partisan Democrats, then by the media and finally by the Republican establishment: “I admire Todd’s stand for the sanctity of life. His steadfast resolve against an onslaught of media bullies and party bosses is the stuff of legend.”

WND.com’s Joseph Farah, who agreed to publish Akin’s “Firing Back,” had this to say: “I could never quite figure out what Todd Akin said that was so offensive to the supposedly pro-life Republicans who attacked him viciously. Had they actually watched the interview? It represents in its entirety one of the best articulations of the life ethic. There’s simply nothing in there that is factually wrong or offensive – unless you are looking to be offended by something. I have watched that interview over and over again in context. Even the interviewer clearly didn’t see anything in Akin’s words to indicate a ‘gotcha.’ He quickly moved on to a different subject without missing a beat. This wasn’t even a minor gaffe. He was technically and scientifically accurate in what he said. This was an example of a media and political lynching.



What does he want to get out of this book? Is it written for revenge? To restart his political career? No, Todd Akin wants what he always wanted – what drove him to run for Congress successfully in the first place. “Everywhere, freedom’s enemies are busy twisting word meanings and attempting to force their opinions on others through what is known as ‘political correctness.’ We should resist this tactic by defending the truth and each other, especially those on our own team. We need to defend truth especially in those areas where liberals are attacking.”



“True freedom builds from the bottom up, and it starts with our ‘selves,’” he writes in “Firing Back.” “In early America, when people heard the word government, they would first think of how each of us, led by God’s Spirit, manages his or her own life. They called it ‘self-government.’ They understood that the character of a citizen was critical to the nature of the country. A nation peopled by wise, hardworking, loving citizens would be altogether different from a nation of dishonest, self-seeking rogues.” (p. 178)

But to be a self-governing people, there must be consensus on what is right and wrong, Akin suggests.

“Perhaps one of the greatest opportunities to return to good ideas and refute bad ideas is through the church,” he writes. “Churches exist in part to warn people of the bad consequences of bad ideas and teach obedience to God’s laws. The source of the Founders’ good ideas was the Bible. They saw the beautiful harmony between God’s Word and the natural world around them. Today, for all the good work our pastors do, many make the mistake of not applying the Bible to the critical issues of our day. This is probably one of the most urgently needed changes in America.” (p. 182)