Boykin Issues Warning About Muslim Brotherhood Infiltration and the Repeal of DADT

On Friday, Jerry Boykin appeared on WND Radio America where he warned host Greg Corombos that the Muslim Brotherhood's infiltration of our government is far beyond what anyone could ever imagine and that the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell will make it difficult for soldiers to bond and therefore unwilling to lay down their lives for one another.

Boykin warned that the Muslim Brotherhood had managed to infiltrate all levels of government, as well as the two main political parties and even the media, citing the criticism that Michele Bachmann received over her anti-Muslim witch hunt as evidence that things are really, really bad:

Our government is so infiltrated and the Muslim Brotherhood has so much influence in this country, it is incredible. If Americans only took the time to do the proper research and to find out just how deep this infiltration into our government is, it would just frighten them. I just gave a talk on this last weekend to some folks here in Washington and they walked away saying "why don't we know this?" And my answer is because it is not in the interest of the mainstream media's agenda to tell you.

We have within, let's just say the Department of Homeland Security, two of the top people there with very high level security clearance are known to be associated with the Muslim Brotherhood. The Republican and Democratic parties are both infiltrated. Every government entity, to include the Department of Defense have people that are know to have had associations with the Muslim Brotherhood. And you know Michele Bachmann recently raised the issue of Huma Abedin, which is Hillary Clinton's closest aide and her parents' association with the Muslim Brotherhood and of course she just got blistered by her own party as well as the mainstream media, so it's bad.

Boykin also addressed the anniversary of the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell to warn that it would take a decade for the true impact of the decision to be felt because it will undermine military readiness by disrupting the bonding between soldiers and make them unwilling to risk their lives for their colleagues:

I think it's reducing the morale of the military.  I also think it's impacting on the readiness, and that readiness is something that unless you've been in the military - particularly in a combat organization - you don't understand it. The full effects of this will not be realized for a decade. But it is a camaraderie and a brotherhood is such that I am willing to risk my life for the guy next to me and that come with an absolute trust and a bonding that I am very concerned that the Don't Ask, Don't Tell repeal will disrupt that bonding, that brotherhood.

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