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Robertson: Don't Let Your Gay Grandson Bring A 'Friend' To Thanksgiving Dinner

On "The 700 Club" today, Pat Robertson praised a man who banned his gay grandson from bringing a "friend" to Thanksgiving dinner because "there's a real good chance that he might come out of that so-called lifestyle" as long as the family does not condone his behavior. 

Fielding a question from a grandfather who had told his grandson that "the presence of his sex partners would not be welcome in our home," especially on Thanksgiving, Robertson praised him for "taking the right stand."

"Otherwise you become an enabler," he said, "and you're condoning that. The chances are there's a real good chance that he might come out of that so-called lifestyle, but if you're going along with it, he says, 'Well, mom likes it, so it's okay.'"

"He's trying to get you to affirmatively accept what he's doing," Robertson continued. "He's trying to force you to do something."

Comparing the situation to one in which someone tries to bring a stripper to Thanksgiving dinner, Robertson said "it's outrageous that he would do that, but that's what's happening ... Let's push people to see how far they'll bend and what you're doing is exactly right, saying, 'I'm not going to let it happen.'"

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/15/15

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 10/15/15

  • Erik Rush warns that "orchestrated rioting among blacks nationwide may ultimately be the pretext for Barack Hussein Obama implementing martial law in the United States." 
  • Russell Moore says that pastors who do not preach against legal abortion are no different than pastors who refused to condemn slavery or lynching.
  • Cindy Jacobs asserts that school shootings are a direct result of removing prayer from public schools because "prayer held the evil one at bay, prohibiting him from creating havoc in our schools and culture."
  • FRC prays for the passage of the First Amendment Defense Act and against the passage of the Equality Act.
  • Finally, Wayne Allyn Root is convinced that this week's Democratic debate was a sham: "I could tell Hillary's answers were all scripted. She clearly was given questions in advance. This is GIGANTIC scandal."

Rick Joyner: 'Donald Trump May Be One Of The Most Humble Of The Candidates'

On his "Prophetic Perspective on Current Events" program earlier this week, Rick Joyner continued to suggest that Donald Trump might be the candidate who God is raising up to save this nation because he is the only candidate who is "humble" enough.

Citing Trump's recent meeting with a group of fringe and extremist Christian leaders, Joyner declared that the GOP presidential hopeful demonstrated that he was "teachable" and "humble" and "incredibly respectful" at that participants left the meeting "amazed at his humility."

"I don't think there is anyone that we could elect to the presidency," Joyner said, "that is going to fix the mess we're in right now. They really are beyond human remedy, we need the favor of God. And God gives His grace to the humble ... I'm wondering if Donald Trump may be one of the most humble of the candidates."

Two Years Ago, Glenn Beck Said He Was 'Definitely' Two Years Away From Being Forced Out Of Business

Nothing seems to irritate Glenn Beck quite like people who mock or dismiss his self-proclaimed prophetic ability to predict the future. Whenever anyone dares to do so, Beck is quick to respond with a rundown off all of the things he claims to have predicted years before they came to fruition, ranging from 9/11, to the 2008 economic crisis, to the rise of "the Caliphate."

Just last weekend, Beck fumed on Facebook that if someone was able to predict the stock market as accurately as he has been able to predict the future, that person would he hailed as "an oracle":

I can tell you what happens in the next five years. But no one has asked me.

Wouldn't someone who nailed the stock market this accurately be called an oracle even if he was wrong on other things?

If he predicted the 08 market crash (which by the way I did beginning in 04), wouldn't someone want to know what he says is coming next?

Beck could tell us "what happens in the next five years," he says, if we would just be willing to ask.

That is an interesting boast, especially since today marks the second anniversary of a screaming meltdown in which Beck warned that America was "definitely" two years away from a time when he would be forced out of business as the nation descended into a dystopian nightmare.

"I think a year from now, definitely two, most Americans are going to be working part-time," Beck said on October 15, 2013. "There will be some IMF global tax that will add an extra 10 percent on everything and people like me will be out of business."

The elite, Beck went on to warn, would have access to things like Google glasses while the rest of society would be reduced to "little worker bees" who, through Common Core, would be trained to serve as nothing more than cogs for the corporations.

"This isn't science fiction, this is science fact!" Beck screamed. "You pieces of garbage, you people in the press, open your damn eyes!"

Somehow, none of that has happened despite Beck's prophecy that it was all "definitely" just two years away, which is difficult for us to comprehend, especially since Beck has also assured us that he is always two years ahead of everyone else in knowing what is coming just around the corner.

Pat Robertson Struggles To Explain Why He's Needed Surgery If Faith Is Enough To Heal Anybody

On "The 700 Club" today, Pat Robertson fielded a logical question from a viewer who wanted to know why Robertson has had to undergo various surgeries if faith is all that it takes to heal any medical condition.

"Why have you undergone surgeries if your faith would be enough?" asked the viewer, prompting Robertson to struggle to provide a coherent answer. 

"I don't think that religion, faith and medicine are necessarily enemies," he said, arguing that sometimes the answer to prayer is found in a doctor's office.

"I don't know what else to say," Robertson finally admitted. "If you have enough faith ... maybe I don't have enough, but I have enough for other people."

Pat Robertson: 'Don't Let This Country Turn Into Russia'

During today's broadcast, "The 700 Club" featured a story about the wrongful termination lawsuit filed by former Atlanta fire chief Kelvin Cochran after he was fired for having distributed an anti-gay book he had written to several coworkers.

Pat Robertson, of course, was outraged by the story and demanded to know why Black Lives Matter activists were not rallying to Cochran's defense.

"This is a shocking thing," Robertson said. "He is a black man. Where are the black people? Black Lives Matter, why don't they stand up and talk about Chief Cochran? It's time that they stand for one of their own."

Robertson went on to fume that "surveys show one percent of the American people are lesbian and perhaps four percent, maybe five percent, are homosexual. That's it! Are we going to allow this tiny minority to take away the jobs of people who believe contrary to their beliefs? What kind of a nation do we have?"

"Don't let this country turn into Russia," he warned.

Right Wing Round-Up - 10/14/15

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 10/14/15

  • "Gordon is paranoid and delusional": Gordon Klingenschmitt's campaign for a seat in Colorado's state Senate seems to be getting off to a great start.
  • Obviously, it is not guns that are to blame for this nation's string of mass shootings but rather the "sex and violence [that] is tied to zombies, witches, vampires, and horror movies."
  • David Barton and George Barna will be leading another American Pastors Network conference in December aimed at getting Christians to vote in order to "raise an individual in the White House to lead this nation from a purely biblical perspective."
  • Jennifer LeClaire laments that the Dutch Reformed Church has voted to recognize gay marriage: "I expect more denominations to fall by the wayside, or break off from their mainline denominations as they embrace doctrines of demons that encourage them to start their own sects of postmodern Christianity that is really not Christianity at all."
  • Finally, Glenn Beck has Bernie Sanders all figured it. It is about morality ... or something. We have no idea what he was talking about.

Yet Again, David Barton Falsely Claims That 91% Of Christians Want To Hear Their Pastors Preach Anti-Abortion Sermons

One thing that you can count on when it comes to David Barton is that once he has adopted a talking point, he is going to continue to endlessly repeat it regardless of how false or misleading it may be.  

Last month, Barton and Glenn Beck unveiled the results of a survey that they had commissioned Christian pollster George Barna to conduct for the purpose of finding out what sorts of issues average churchgoing Christians wanted to hear their pastors preach about from the pulpits.

Or at least, that is how Barton has been presenting it.

In reality, Barna's survey was heavily biased since a whopping 92 percent of those surveyed were "spiritually active Christians who hold politically conservative views." In other words, Barna's survey represents only the views of Religious Right and conservative Christian activists, but Barton has misleadingly presented it time and again as representing the views of all Christians.

Last month, Barton spoke at a conference on "Religious Liberty in 21st Century America" at a church in Hartland, Michigan, where yet again he falsely portrayed this survey as representing the views of Christians as a whole.

"Christians, in particular, are saying , 'We need some clarity for ourselves and for our kids, we need to know what the Bible says on certain issues,'" Barton stated. "Well, what issues do Christians want to know about? And so we commissioned a poll, George Barna, national pollster, went to the field and asked Christians, 'What is it you want clear guidance on from the Bible? What do you want to hear from your religious leaders?'"

"It came back," he continued, "that of those who said it is critically important or very important for me and my family to hear a biblical perspective ... The number one issue is abortion. Ninety-one percent of Christians said, 'I need to hear about abortion from church leaders.'"

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