Donald Trump Gets Backing Of Activists Who Deny Marital Rape, Oppose Women's Suffrage

It isn’t at all surprising that a candidate who has a long history of making misogynistic and degrading statements about women, has bragged about the endorsement of a convicted rapist, has talked about Hillary Clinton getting “schlonged,” and at one point backed the idea of punishing women who have abortions would attract the support of those with their own histories of troubling rhetoric about women.

Indeed, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has touted the endorsements of several politicians and activists who have done everything from denounce women’s suffrage to deny the existence of marital rape.

1) Phyllis Schlafly

Trump was quite honored to receive the endorsement of Phyllis Schlafly, who introduced him at a St. Louis rally and repeatedly praised his plans to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

Schlafly is the founder of the anti-feminist group Eagle Forum and is best known for helping defeat the Equal Rights Amendment.

Among her anti-feminist beliefs is the claim that marital rape does not exist.

“By getting married, the woman has consented to sex, and I don't think you can call it rape,” she said in 2007, later explaining that marital rape is simply a fabrication invented by feminists who want to levy the accusation when “they get tired of a husband” or “want to fight over child custody.” (Trump’s own lawyer has similarly claimed that marital rape is not rape).

Besides denying the existence of marital rape, she has blamed reports of sexual assaults on college campuses on the rising number of female college students, criticizing policies to combat assaults for turning college campuses into “a dangerous place for men.”

“There isn’t any rape culture,” she said in 2014. “There is a war on men.”

Colleges, according to Schlafly, should stop enforcing Title IX and install gender quotas to protect male admissions.

She has also proposed “increasing the so-called pay gap” between men and women in order to help women find husbands, since “the pay gay, really, is something that women like” as they would prefer to marry “a higher-earning man.”

2) Joe Arpaio

Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona, has been one of Trump’s biggest boosters, campaigning with the candidate and cheering on his anti-immigrant proposals.

Arpaio, who admits to keeping prisoners in a “concentration camp,” was challenged by the Justice Department over his widespread abuse and targeting of Latinos, particularly Latina women.

As Ian Millhiser noted in Think Progress, the Justice Department’s complaint cataloged instances where Arpaio’s deputies were “forcing women to sleep in their own menstrual blood,” “assaulting pregnant women,” “stalking Latina women” and “ignoring rape.”

Last year, The Guardian reports, Arpaio’s office “agreed to pay $3.5m to settle a lawsuit that alleged metro Phoenix’s sheriff botched the investigation into the rape of a 13-year-old girl and failed to arrest the suspect who then went on to sexually attack her again,” a case that “was among more than 400 sex-crime cases that were inadequately investigated or not looked into at all by Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio’s office during a three-year period ending in 2007.”

3) Ann Coulter

While Trump has been campaigning with conservative columnist Ann Coulter to promote her attacks on immigrants, we wonder if she will ever lead one of his campaign rallies in a chant against women’s suffrage.

Indeed, Coulter has repeatedly voiced her opposition to women having the right to vote, saying that revoking women’s suffrage is necessary to help elect Republicans.

This is far from Coulter’s only controversial views on women’s issues.

She once said that women who claim to have been raped are typically “girls trying to get attention” and refused to condemn the murder of abortion provider George Tiller, mocking concerns about violence against abortion providers.

4) Scott DesJarlais

Among the first members of Congress to endorse Trump was Tennessee Republican Scott DesJarlais, who along with some of his fellow GOP lawmakers met with Trump in March to work on ways to unify the party.

As we’ve noted, the GOP congressman has quite the record on women’s issues:

Before running for Congress as a “pro-life” and “pro-family” Republican, “DesJarlais, a physician, pressured a patient who was his mistress to get an abortion. It was later revealed that the pro-life congressman had approved of his first wife having two abortions, and that he’d had sex with at least two patients.” He also had affairs with “three coworkers and a drug representative,” and was later fined for violating medical ethics.

DesJarlais’ ex-wife also accused him of “dry firing a gun outside the Plaintiff's locked bedroom door, [admitting] suicidal ideation, holding a gun in his mouth for three hours, an incident of physical intimidation at the hospital; and previous threatening behavior ... i.e. shoving, tripping, pushing down, etc.”

5) Robert Jeffress

Texas-based pastor Robert Jeffress is one of Trump’s most outspoken Religious Right supporters and campaign surrogates. For instance, Jeffress rushed to Trump’s defense when he said that women who have abortions should face “some form of punishment.”

Jeffress, an enthusiastic conspiracy theorist, has also dismissed security threats against abortion providers and clinics and, like Trump, has some interesting thoughts about the 9/11 attacks.

The Southern Baptist pastor argued that God let the attacks take place because “he certainly won’t allow the sacrifice of children to go unpunished,” referring to legal abortion.

With endorsers like these, Trump will be well on his way to winning the women’s vote.

Gaffney: Susan Rice Diversity Speech Example Of 'Racist Assaults On The Common Defense'

Frank Gaffney, the head of the Center for Security Policy and a former national security adviser to Ted Cruz’s presidential campaign, was put off by a speech that White House national security adviser Susan Rice gave in Florida yesterday advocating for greater diversity in national security and foreign policy agencies.

“By now, we should all know the dangers of ‘groupthink,’ where folks who are alike often think alike,” Rice said. “By contrast, groups comprised of different people tend to question one another’s assumptions, draw on divergent perspectives and experiences, and yield better outcomes.”

This was too much for Gaffney to handle, so he dedicated his “ Secure Freedom Minute” broadcast today to blasting Rice’s “racism” against white people and claiming that the Obama administration is launching “racist assaults on the common defense” on top of such ongoing projects as “the sexual and social reengineering of the armed forces.”

The definition of racism is imputing shared qualities to a given population simply because they have a skin color in common. Yesterday in Florida, Obama national security adviser Susan Rice declared that people who are alike, namely white people, often think alike. She went on effectively to suggest that Caucasians should therefore be denied employment opportunities in the national security community so that America is ‘fully reflected’ in its ranks. That’s racism.

Worse yet, the White House press secretary indicated that the president agrees. So add racist assaults on the common defense to such other Obama initiatives as debilitating defense budget cuts, religious persecution against Christians in uniform, a lack of training and new weaponry, crippling environmental restrictions and the sexual and social reengineering of the armed forces. The cumulative effect is to leave them hollowed out and inviting enemy aggression. Some legacy.

Jim Bakker: God Told Me 'A Major Event' Will Take Place In The Future

Last year, televangelist Jim Bakker prophesied that all sorts of bad things might happen on September 13 of that year, including typhoons, earthquakes, bombings, a financial collapse and/or an unspecified incident involving Pope Francis.

Since none of those prophesies ended up coming true, Bakker has now started making much vaguer predictions, including one he delivered this week while pitching his famous food buckets.

“I believe it’s time to hear from God and God has been speaking to me,” he said. “I walked out of my garage yesterday and as I’m walking and things happened and when one of those, you might call them crazy things, but God said, ‘A major event is about to take place.’ I knew that I knew that I knew. And every time that God ever speaks to me like that, something happens.”

He then said that once viewers pray and speak to God, they should call his ministry or visit his website to order food buckets because “one day it will be too late.”

Right Wing Round-Up - 5/11/16

  • Andy Towle @ Towleroad: American Counseling Association Cancels Nashville Conference Over Anti-Gay Therapist Law. 
  • Emma Cueto @ Bustle: 100 Methodist Clergy Just Came Out As LGBTQ In A Courageous Statement For Inclusion.

Right Wing Bonus Tracks - 5/11/16

  • Televangelist James Robison asks: “What if, by the miraculous grace of God, these two Republican politicians — Donald Trump and Ted Cruz — came together and were moved in supernatural unity? ….What if they chose to serve God and others together, for the sake of freedom, by serving one another and leading America as a team? What if they not only shook hands but got on their knees together to seek God’s best for all of us, whom the Father loves so deeply?”
  • Anti-LGBT activist Linda Harvey declares that “homosexuals and the ‘transgendered’ are victims only of their own desires and delusions.”
  • Andrea Lafferty of the Traditional Values Coalition says that “Martin Luther King Jr. didn't march on Selma so that grown men and boys could march into girls changing rooms and showers.” 
  • Alveda King is tired of all the people “suggesting that allowing everyone to use the same public bathrooms will solve America's problems” since “America’s moral dilemma won’t be solved in the public bathrooms of America.”

Religious Right Leaders Head To Republic Of Georgia For 'Pro-Family' Attacks On West

The World Congress of Families, a global network of organizations that oppose LGBT equality and legal access to abortion, will hold its annual summit in Tbilisi, capital of the former Soviet republic of Georgia, beginning on Sunday, May 15. Over the next several days, American Religious Right activists will meet with their counterparts from around the world to share and plan strategies for resisting and rolling back women’s and LGBT rights — often lumped together with opposition to sex education under the banner of fighting “gender ideology.”

This year’s summit is likely to feature a particular focus on siding with Putin’s Russia and the Orthodox Church as defenders of “Christian civilization” against a secular, decadent West. Georgia, which joined the Council of Europe in 1999, is front and center in what many of these activists see as a civilizational battle. Last October the EU and Council of Europe recommended policy changes to strengthen human rights protections in Georgia; the action plan to achieve them was launched this week. Back in 2014, with the encouragement of the EU, Georgia adopted a sweeping nondiscrimination law, which infuriated people like the WCF summit’s chair, businessman and philanthropist Levan Vasadze, who called the law part of “an international agenda” to “destroy the family.”

An anti-Western quote from Vasadze has been featured on the WCF home page this week:

The West is attacking our Christian culture with atheism, new forms of socialism and sexual radicalism — worse than what we saw during the last 25 years when we were part of the Soviet empire. This is why we need you to come to Tbilisi and work with us.

A WCF regional conference in Tbilisi in 2014 released a declaration criticizing Georgia’s adoption of the Law on Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination, calling the law “an unnatural and an artificial imposition of pseudo-morality upon Georgian traditional society.” The declaration is a screed against such nondiscrimination laws, saying they “lead to serious discrimination of people respective traditional moral and family values, especially Christians, and to the massive human rights violations.” More from the declaration:

We believe that pseudo-values connected with promotion of “sexual diversity” and favoring different kinds of immoral and perverse sexual behaviors, are harmful for the society and have nothing to do with the real foundational values of humanity and with the genuine and universally recognized human rights. They are contradicting the values and teachings of major great religions of our planet. These pseudo-values are designed to destroy the institution of the family, moral and spiritual foundations of the society and to drive human beings into solitude and enslavement to vulgar materialism and lust. Family statistics in Western Europe as well as unprecedented levels of debt for western population, alarming rise of consumption of anti-depressants, addictive medicaments as well as narcotics, rampant child violence and rising suicide rates are a vivid proof of that. To our despair, Western Europe in particular and western culture in general, seem now to be on the path to self-destruction through family demise and moral degradation.

That theme was helpfully echoed this week by the Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN), which ran a story titled, “Western Invasion: Inside Georgia’s Battle Against the Gay Agenda.” The story quotes Vasadze promoting “selective Westernization” and saying, “the opening must not happen at the expense of Georgia’s faith and family values.” Adds Vasadze:

“If you think indecent, radically sexual behavior is what you want to do — that's your choice. But if I think that this is an embarrassing sin, I want to remain a society which is allowed to say that …The frontline of that war is no longer found on the geographic map of this planet," he warned. "The frontline of this war is in every living room and in every bedroom where your wife and my wife and our children sleep.”

Pat Robertson, the televangelist and CBN founder, responded to the story by saying “the fact that the European Union and the U.S. is trying to impose this lifestyle on a little country like Georgia that wants to stay Orthodox is incredible.”

The CBN story aligns nicely with themes in anti-Western propaganda in Georgia, which is the focus of a report by The Media Development Foundation, a project of the United Nations Association of Georgia with the support of the U.S. Agency for International Development. The report finds that “anti-Western rhetoric is often applied in xenophobic and homophobic contexts and it is associated with unjustified fears, which is an accompanying process of modernization.” Another theme portrays the West as “a fighter against Orthodox Christianity.”

Another recent report on Russian influence on Georgian media and NGOs examines groups such as the Young Political Scientists’ Club, an initiative of the Eurasian Institute, noting that the group uses nationalist anti-Europe and anti-gay statements by clergy to promote anti-Western sentiments. The group declared that violence following the 2013 IDAHOT celebration, in which gay-rights marchers were attacked by Orthodox priests and their supporters, was the result of “western provocation.”  At the time, Patriarch Ilia, the leader of the Georgian Orthodox Church, distanced himself from the violence but said of the IDAHOT event, “It’s something that should not be propagandized.” One of the pro-Russian media outlets examined in the report is Patriot TV, founded in 2015, which “is based on the authentic Georgian traditions, useful for the future generation of our country. A television which serves the purpose of Georgian, ethical ideas and not anti-Christian, sodomite propaganda which, unfortunately, floods our media space.”

At last year’s WCF in Salt Lake City, the Mormon Church had a visible role, with an opening keynote featuring Russell Ballard, a high-ranking elder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The WCF summit in Georgia, the first in a predominantly Orthodox country, will include a similar address from Patriarch Ilia II, the country’s popular Orthodox Church leader. Ilia has designated May 17 — which will be celebrated around the world as the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia — as “A Day to Strengthen Families and Honor Parents.”

In Utah, the Sutherland Institute served as WCF’s local organizing partner; this year that role is being played by the Georgian Demographic Society XXI, founded and chaired by Vasadze, who appears to play a role in Georgia somewhat similar to the one played in Russia by Konstantin Malofeev, the Putin ally who funds Russian Orthodox Church ventures. The Vasadze bio posted on the summit’s website touts his role in defending “traditional society,” saying he is “the author of an October petition signed by 36 prominent Georgian intellectuals protesting a report by the EU’s Special Advisor on Human Rights, which criticized the nation’s treatment of so-called sexual minorities.”

The speakers’ list for this year’s World Congress of Families is, as usual, a who’s who of global anti-choice and anti-LGBT culture warriors, including many of the same people who spoke at the last WCF summit.

American speakers include, in addition to the WCF’s Doug Clark, Allan Carson, Don Feder and Larry Jacobs:

Other Americans speaking include Justin Murff of the Christian Broadcasting Network; Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute; Fr. Josiah Trenham, member of the secretariat of the U.S. Assembly of Orthodox Bishops; Gregory Johnson, a board member of the National Association of Evangelicals; and Christopher Carmouche from GrasstopsUSA.

Prominent Europeans include:

  • Marion Maréchal Le Pen, granddaughter of far-right French politician and National Front founder Jean-Marie Le Pen and niece of the party’s current president Marine Le Pen;
  • Ignacio Arsuaga of Spain, founder of CitizenGo and HazteOir, groups meant to help European cultural conservatives deploy online organizing techniques in Europe’s current culture wars;
  • Luca Volonte, chairman of Italy’s Novae Terrae Foundation and an anti-gay and anti-choice activist, who was honored at last year’s World Congress of Families gathering;
  • Gabriele Kuby, a German sociologist engaged in battling “gender ideology” and author of The Global Sexual Revolution: The Destruction of Freedom in the Name of Freedom”;
  • Katalin Novak, Hungary’s Minister of State for Family and Youth Affairs;
  • and Antoni Szymański, member of the Polish Senate.

Russians scheduled to speak include:

Also speaking will be Theresa Okafor, WCF’s Nigeria-based African representative, who supports repressive anti-LGBT legislation in Africa and suggested that gay-rights activists are involved in a conspiracy with terrorist group Boko Haram to “silence Christians” and who was honored at last year’s summit.

 

Conservative Founder Of Curves Gym Is A 9/11 Truther Who Wants To Save Us From The 'Shadow Government'

Last month, we reported on a new right-wing movie called “AmeriGEDDON,” which features the United Nations conspiring with other nefarious actors to launch a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack against the U.S. in order to give the government a reason to impose martial law and begin confiscating firearms.

The film’s executive producer and lead actor is Gary Heavin, the founder of the women’s fitness franchise Curves and a supporter of conservative causes, particularly the anti-abortion movement. He is also a frequent guest on InfoWars, the conspiracy theory outlet that is featured in the trailer to “AmeriGEDDON.”

Heavin promoted the movie last week on “The Jim Bakker Show,” where he said that Bakker’s program and his movie are needed because the U.S. media is pushing propaganda and lies on the American people … such as what really happened during the attacks on September 11, 2001.

Indeed, Heavin said God revealed to him the truth about 9/11:

The idea that Building No. 7, that was not even hit by a plane, could freefall from furniture burning at the speed of gravity is nonsensical, but they’ve been able to get away with that version of things because they control the message. I have to admit, I didn’t want to think about it and it wasn’t but a few years ago that I was on my ranch in Australia, just retired, I’m sitting out under a palm tree and I said, ‘Okay, God, I’ve got time now, peel the onion back,’ and that was one of the first areas of information that God revealed to me.

I’m a jet pilot and the plane that flew into the Pentagon apparently had no wings because there’s only a hole and, by the way, the hole is smaller than the fuselage of a 757, it’s about the size of a missile, and the most videoed building in the world had no video of the plane hitting the building, and, by the way, there was no debris, there were no suitcases, there were no engines. What’s preposterous is the idea that that was a plane flying into the building.

Most Americans, it’s getting close, about 50 percent of Americans today, say, ‘Wait a minute, this doesn’t make sense,’ and Donald Trump — whether you love him or hate him, sounds like you love him—has the courage to ask these questions that we get ridiculed for. And, by the way, ridicule is a strategy of the Enemy.

Heavin told Bakker that a secretive and powerful “shadow government” exists in the world “that wants us to die to have a diminished population.”

This shadow government, Heavin said, is “setting us up for disaster,” and he knows this because he has “sensed that people that are in positions of influence” neither care about nor like Americans and support the creation of “a one world government.”

He then won cheers from Bakker’s studio audience when he lashed out at the refugee resettlement program and American immigration policy, which he cited as proof that the government is deliberately attempting to incite unrest.

Heavin, half-jokingly, also suggested that people with pacemakers should wrap themselves in “EMP-proof suits” just in case an EMP strike occurs.

No, Juan Williams, The Culture Wars Are Not 'Done'

Fox News political analyst Juan Williams begins his latest column in The Hill by declaring, “Call in the dogs. Pack up the tent. Culture wars in American politics are done.”

According to Williams, Donald Trump’s triumph over the Republican field has defeated the Religious Right once and for all. If only it were so.

The real estate heir’s inability to clearly articulate policy positions and his acceptance by the GOP’s base should not be mistaken for surrender.

It demonstrates a stunning degree of tone deafness or perhaps a willful blindness that Williams would make the argument that the “culture wars” are dead in the immediate aftermath of North Carolina enacting HB2. Or in the aftermath of Tennessee’s state legislature passing a bill that would allow therapists to discriminate against patients based on their sexual orientation. (Thankfully the governor vetoed it.) Or Mississippi passing legislation that would allow businesses to deny services to LGBT individuals. Or Republican lawmakers in states across the country enacting an unprecedented number of anti-abortion laws.

Women’s access to birth control is still a matter of public debate and gay, lesbian, and transgender individuals can still face discrimination across wide swaths of our country in the workplace, in housing, and even when attempting to access basic services.

Perhaps Williams is ignorant of his own employer’s coverage of phony “War on Christmas” stories every holiday season.

Furthermore, claiming Donald Trump’s candidacy represents the end of the culture wars denies the basic premise of his campaign. His attacks on women, Muslims, immigrants and political correctness as a whole are part and parcel of the culture wars. Not to mention that in speech after speech he declares that if he is president “we are going to staring saying Merry Christmas again.” He says the Bible is his favorite book, a clear message to the Religious Right.

Donald Trump might be ok with Caitlyn Jenner using the women’s room — just as he claims his ban on travel into the United States by Muslims will not apply to the newly elected mayor of London — but that doesn’t mean his White House will be friendly to groups whose rights are under assault from conservatives.

The vast majority of his policies are simply a jumble of word salad punctuated with rambling non sequiturs about “winning” and “making America great again.” His pronouncements on abortion rights are incoherent and sometimes out of step with the Right, but he has nevertheless pledged to support anti-choice legislation and appoint judges who will seek to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Many of the generals who have led the culture war for decades are rallying to Trump’s cause. Phyllis Schlafly is actively calling on Christian leaders to support the presumptive Republican nominee, announcing, “there will be only two viable candidates to choose from this fall, only one of whom will safeguard our country against immigration — and Jesus will not be on the ballot.”

Other anti-abortion warriors are now endorsing Trump following the announcement that John Mashburn, a longtime ally of the movement as a Senate staffer, has joined his campaign as policy director.

“If elected, no doubt John Mashburn will serve you well as you fulfill your campaign promises to defund Planned Parenthood, advance and sign into law the popular Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, and appoint Justices to the bench who will protect and defend the Constitution,” wrote Susan B. Anthony List president Marjorie Dannenfelser.

Far from surrendering, Donald Trump represents a new front in battles that have been waged for decades. A candidate who is more than happy to use racial and religious resentment to win the Republican nomination, and who leaves no doubt he would continue to do so in the White House, does not represent the end of the culture wars.

Michele Bachmann Wishes Congress Would Impeach Obama

Upset about the New York Times Magazine profile of Obama administration adviser Ben Rhodes, ex-Rep. Michele Bachmann told Family Research Council President Tony Perkins yesterday that the White House misled Congress and the American people about the “tragic” Iran nuclear agreement.

Bachmann repeated her insistence that Congress should move to impeach President Obama, among other officials, but lamented that congressional leaders will not take action because “Congress doesn’t seem to have enough of a backbone to do anything with this president.”

“There should be impeachment proceedings brought up against all sorts of people in the administration,” she said. “Certainly the president should be subject to impeachment. I don’t think we’re going to see that come from this Congress, but they should.”

Anti-Abortion Extremist Troy Newman Backs Trump

Troy Newman, the head of Operation Rescue and a driving force behind last year’s series of videos smearing Planned Parenthood, writes today that although Donald Trump “has said and done many things that most Christians would find despicable,” he will vote for him — although not formally endorse him — in the presidential election.

Newman caused some controversy when he was tapped as a leader of an anti-choice coalition on Ted Cruz’s campaign. The anti-choice activist, who has built his career around harassing abortion providers, once wrote that the government has a biblical responsibility to execute abortion providers and had linked legal abortion in the U.S. to the 9/11 attacks, AIDS and the drought in California.

Newman explains his support for Trump using a “pithy acronym” that includes his hope that Trump will “take back the Supreme Court” from one that has “mandated that we purchase a health care product, marry homosexuals, and is now poised to strike down common sense abortion laws” and his admiration for Trump’s “nationalistic fervor.”

As we have been reporting, anti-abortion leaders who previously criticized Trump have been gradually falling in line behind the candidate.

To explain my reasoning, I’ve created a pithy acronym out of Trump’s name. These are the reasons I can vote for Trump, and against Hillary Clinton.

T ake back the Supreme Court. In order for this country to survive, we must dial back the Supremes. In just the last few years the Court has mandated that we purchase a health care product, marry homosexuals, and is now poised to strike down common sense abortion laws. Hillary has promised more of the same; Trump has promised the opposite. So, Trump wins the SCOTUS vote.

R emove and Replace. Trump has pledged to remove and replace the Abortion Cartel Bailout AKA ObamaCare, and the countless bad laws created by Obama and far-left enablers in Congress. Hillary will absolutely maintain and further them.

U ndo! Undo it all. I know Obama ran on “change.” I say change it back! Undo all that “change” and bring America back to some form of sanity. Undo the HHS mandates on abortion subsidies. Undo the EPA mandates that are crippling businesses. Undo the countless, and dare I say illegal, executive orders made by Obama. Trump has a mind to do this.

M ake America Great Again. Trump’s nationalistic fervor is appealing. And, I have to admit I like it. Pro-life legislation will help put America back on track. Obama has been making terrible deals all over the world, and the good ol’ U-S-of-A gets the short end of the stick every time. That must stop. Together, we can make America great again – but not under Hillary. Never under Hillary.

P rosecute Planned Parenthood. We have helped expose the dreadful practice of harvesting and selling baby body parts for a large profit. It’s high time these people are taken off the Federal welfare dole, and Trump, for what it’s worth, has promised to prosecute these monsters. Yes, sir, I’ll take that too. Hillary, on the other hand, we already know is Cecile Richards’ BFF. Absolutely nothing doing if she wins.

These are my five very pragmatic reasons why I can vote FOR Donald Trump and AGAINST Hillary Clinton. I know these reasons don’t take into account whether or not Trump is saved, if he is a good father, or even if he is totally honest in his business deals. But, at least he knows how to make money and balance a checkbook. Something Hillary Clinton has never done.

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