Robert Oscar Lopez: Gay Rights Movement Is 'Violent' Even Though 'Many Still Stereotype Gays As Delicate'

Anti-gay activist and author of gay erotica Robert Oscar Lopez has compiled a list of 300 incidents that he thinks illustrate the scourge of “homofascism.” He writes today in the American Thinker that “homofacism” is “less nationalistic than past fascisms, though more invasive and consuming because it polices interpersonal relationships and interior thoughts in a way that earlier police states did not.” He adds that the movement “it is violent, even though we tend not to think of the movement as violent because many still stereotype gays as delicate, and the violence is usually carried out through the seemingly legitimate auspices of the state.”

There is a mass movement aimed at stifling the autonomy of natural relationships – friendships, familial love, romantic love, human reverence for the divine – and subverting such relationships to the punitive power of an intrusive state. It is as sweeping and menacing as past isms, including fascism, to which it reveals a number of striking resemblances.

It is difficult to comprehend, partly because it operates so often with emotional subterfuge, and partly because it is unprecedented. It is less nationalistic than past fascisms, though more invasive and consuming because it polices interpersonal relationships and interior thoughts in a way that earlier police states did not. I have come to realize, though, that it is violent, even though we tend not to think of the movement as violent because many still stereotype gays as delicate, and the violence is usually carried out through the seemingly legitimate auspices of the state.

This strange fascism has grown under the guise of advocating for a marginalized and even obscure population – homosexuals and bisexuals – whose interests are in no way served by this movement, and who are themselves some of the people most vulnerable to repression by it. The stakes are huge, the urgency serious. We have to call it something, and its name should evoke the dramatic emergency it is presenting to the globe. So let’s just call it “homofascism” for simplicity’s sake.

The thought crosses my mind quite often: could I have made a difference if I’d come forward and spoken out in 2004? In 2000? In 1994? Homofascism feeds on silence. The less you confront it, the more it hunts you down and strikes at you. It is a strange beast. Perhaps if conservatives had stopped being so afraid of offending people and taken this threat seriously twenty years ago, many of the victims catalogued in our 300 list would not have been prey for the search-and-destroy missions of the gay lobby.

But regrets do little. We need to move forward. My allies’ purpose in archiving the history of homofascism is to provide a resource, to make sure that people on our side know how high the stakes are, and how false the veneers of the other side are. We are facing a vicious, lethal enemy, and we have to fight back accordingly. Ever forward.

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