Religious Right Paranoia Knows No Bounds

Earlier this month, representatives of the Secular Student Alliance were invited, for the first time, to attend a meeting hosted by the White House's Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

According to SSA, the meeting focused on "connecting the higher education sector to broader national service priorities and creating spaces on campus to foster interfaith and community service" ... and Bishop Harry Jackson is outraged that atheists were included, seeing it as proof that President Obama and his administration hate Christians: 

Bishop Harry Jackson with the Fellowship of International Churches tells OneNewsNow he believes the White House is trying to expand the tent of faith to include atheists and non-religious people as a way to discredit Bible-believing evangelicals.

"I think we're being set up -- for people of living faith who believe in a born-again experience who follow the Bible -- to be seen as knuckle-dragging Neanderthals who need to come into the 21st century," Jackson said.

He argued that, in the 20 years that President Obama sat under the preaching of his pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama was exposed to a worldview that included aberrant ideas. For example, Wright likened the Supreme Court to the Ku Klux Klan, said the U.S. had brought the 9/11 terrorist attacks on itself, and insisted that the U.S. government had invented HIV as a way to kill minorities.

"Then it stands to reason that you would not see anything wrong in including all these kinds of folks [atheists] in your religious program," Bishop Jackson said, "and you kind of feel like this is what America really is like and this is what the faith community should be like because this is the world you as a president had experienced in your pre-presidential days."

The White House, he believes, has bought into the concept that America is no longer a Christian nation.

The meeting sought to create a "dialogue on interfaith and community service with University Presidents, faculty, Chaplains, foundations, religious and community leaders and other key partners" and included "more than 120 leading scholars, academics, university presidents, chaplains, foundations, and student service organizations [who] attended the convening from institutions across the country [and] reflected the diversity of views and backgrounds across the country with Presidents of evangelical and Catholic colleges, Muslim and Buddhist chaplains, Hindu and Jewish student organizations and representatives from secular service groups as well."

Two of the 120 in attendance were representatives of Secular Student Alliance ... so obviously, the entire meeting was just an effort by the White House "to discredit Bible-believing evangelicals."