Mohler Reminds Christians That Birth Control Started 'Sexual Misbehavior' Slippery Slope

Albert Mohler’s most recent book, “We Cannot Be Silent,” got a lot of attention for the Southern Baptist leader’s argument that Christians should boycott gay family member’s weddings. But that was just part of Mohler’s thesis, which he started with a history of “the breakdown of marriage as an institution,” including widespread contraceptive use, liberalized divorce laws and cohabitation.

In an interview with the “Christian Worldview” radio program on Saturday, Mohler went over this argument again, chastising Christians for failing to realize that the “moral revolution” that led to marriage equality started with birth control (which evangelical women use at a higher rate than the population as a whole).

“We are clearly at a very important turning point, but you have to go back to the early 20th century when sexual revolutionaries largely funded an effort to separate sex and procreation, and that was birth control,” he said. “And most Christians seem to think today that birth control was just something that came along as something of a scientific or medical development. They fail to see that it was driven by moral revolutionaries who knew that you couldn’t have a moral revolution, you especially couldn’t have a sexual revolution, unless you could separate sex and babies.”

“You know,” he said, “one kind of sexual misbehavior leads to the rationalization of another, and thus we couldn’t have the Obergefell decision that came this June, we couldn’t have the legalization of same-sex marriage, if there hadn’t been a lot of sexual revolution before we got there.”

The program’s host, David Wheaton, also asked Mohler to address his advice on Christians attending the weddings of gay friends and family members, which Mohler said they should “absolutely not” do “because to participate in a same-sex wedding in any way is uniquely to give an affirmation of it.”

“That’s the one thing Christians can’t do,” he said. “We can do our very best to be good neighbors to all people who may be around us and next to us, we should not seek to segregate ourselves. You know, we go to a Little League game, if there’s a same-sex couple who are parenting their kid who’s on the same Little League team as our kid, there’s every reason to go sit next to them in order to establish a relationship to share the gospel, but going to a wedding is the one thing we can’t do.”