Kevin Swanson 'Goes To Jail' But Will Never Stop Exposing Shakespeare For Ruining America With His Homosexuality

In a video advertisement for his new book, “Apostate,” Colorado pastor Kevin Swanson dresses up as a prisoner who former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter has put in jail for quoting Leviticus 20:13.

Such ploys are nothing new: Religious Right activists have consistently warned that they will be imminently jailed for their beliefs.

The Colorado-based pastor and radio host already warned us that “demon-possessed” Mark Twain helped destroy America by writing books mocking Christian hypocrisy on the issue of slavery, and a laudatory WorldNetDaily review of his book informs us that William Shakespeare and Nathaniel Hawthorne are also to blame for the country’s looming collapse.

Swanson writes in “Apostate” that Shakespeare planted the “seedbeds for homosexual themes and homosexual behavior,” and takes issue with Hawthorne’s “psychotic” criticism of the Puritans.

Swanson’s analysis of the roles played by men like Charles Darwin (obvious), John Locke, Ralph Waldo Emerson, John Dewey, and Nathaniel Hawthorne – among others – is so compelling, “Apostate” should be a Bible study in churches across the land.

In a supremely clever and eye-opening bit of writing, Swanson refers to these men as the “Nephilim,” which of course find their fame in the book of Genesis – the mysterious beings who sought to corrupt mankind. It is a precise and descriptive word to explain the dark agendas that unfold in this book.

Let’s take Hawthorne for example. As Swanson writes: “Nathaniel Hawthorne was the 19th century American literary giant who did more to shift the American culture away from its national Christian heritage than anyone else. His hatred of the Puritans was deeply personal, relentlessly bitter and marginally psychotic.”

And I just thought Hawthorne was stone-cold boring.



A lesser-known toxic presence – in the context of “Apostate” – was William Shakespeare.

Swanson has done his research, and shows that the Bard was a somewhat shadowy figure: “Mystery surrounds his education, religious background and his induction into the theater scene in London.”

Swanson also pulls back the curtain on a key plot point with regard to Shakespeare and the influence of theater (which of course has evolved in our day to film): “Since Shakespeare’s day, the theater and the fine arts have become seedbeds for homosexual themes and homosexual behavior.”

Swanson explores the relationship between Shakespeare and fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe, and notes that Shakespeare left his wife, Anne Hathaway.

These are among the amazing profiles Swanson addresses as he shines an important light on the roots of anti-Christian thought in Europe and even America. It’s a critical contribution to the literature and should be studied by anyone interested in the rise and fall of civilizations.

Filed Under

Organizations:

WorldNetDaily