Brody and Farah Dismiss Jason Collins, Upset Over Gay Acceptance

Reacting yesterday to NBA player Jason Collins’ coming out, the Christian Broadcasting Network’s David Brody argued that it doesn’t take much courage to come out these days because being gay is “hip,” “chic” and “the thing to do.” Of course, if Brody’s boss Pat Robertson had his way, Collins would be completely shunned by society.

Just a thought on the Jason Collins story. I’m not denying it took some guts to come out as gay when you’re a professional sports player but let’s also get a little perspective here. Polls in America now show a majority of Americans support gay marriage (53%) and 54% think being gay is morally acceptable behavior. So it’s not like Jason Collins is in the minority of public opinion. He’s actually now among the majority in this country! It would have been one thing if he had done this a few years ago but now? C’mon. What he did is so “chic” right? We are told it’s now ok to be gay right? It’s hip! We’ve got NBA players commending him today not shunning him. Where is the adversity? He's being treated as a hero by most people not an outcast.

So while I understand that when you’re the first to do something you get a lot of attention, let’s be real here. Jason Collins came out as gay at a time in American culture when it is relatively safe to do so. It’s the thing to do! Excuse me if I don’t attend the Ticker Tape Parade on this.

Meanwhile, WorldNetDaily editor Joseph Farah praised ESPN commentator Chris Broussard for attacking Collins and lamented the current “obsession” over making “heroes out of people because of their sexual proclivities.”

So far, only one person knowledgeable in sports has had the guts to say what is really going on here – Chris Broussard, an NBA analyst on ESPN whose job might very well be in danger for stating his honest opinion. Broussard, a Christian, said that living openly as a homosexual is a sin and that doing so was “walking in open rebellion to God and Jesus Christ.”

Now that takes courage. These days, that’s risky business.

There’s little need for Collins to worry about media reaction or how most NBA stars will react to the big announcement. They’ve already been put on notice by the sport cartel that showers them in tens of millions and sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars to run up and down a basketball court.



Whether or not Collins ever plays professional basketball or not, you can be assured he will not suffer. There will be book contracts, movie deals and lots of personal appearances.

Who says sin doesn’t pay?

And what can one say about the obsession by people like the Obamas and the Clintons in making heroes out of people because of their sexual proclivities?