Ralph Reed

Right Wing Round-Up

Reed: Cain and Bachmann Will Be The Religious Right's Candidates of Choice

Ralph Reed's "Faith and Freedom Conference & Summit" kicks off on Friday and, as today's New York Times reports, it serves as proof that Reed has been able to shrug off his deep ties to Jack Abramoff and regain his prominence and prestige as a leading Religious Right organizer:

As with the Christian Coalition, this group’s conference roster includes nearly all the likely contenders for the presidential nomination, including former Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, former Gov. Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota, Herman Cain, a retired businessman, and Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, as well as a famous almost-candidate, Donald Trump. There will also be evangelical leaders like Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council, and establishment Republicans like Speaker John A. Boehner and Reince Priebus, the Republican National Committee chairman.

...

Many of the retirees gathered here could not even recall who Ralph Reed was, let alone ponder his past. But they loved his message. Weaving together themes of the Tea Party and evangelical Christians, he called the debt crisis a sign that the country has lost sight of its founding moral principles. He said that by working together, fiscal and cultural conservatives can “begin the process of turning the country around.”

Yesterday Reed appeared on The Jordan Sekulow Show to discuss the upcoming conference, during which he predicted that Michele Bachmann and Herman Cain would be the Religious Right's candidates of choice:

Sekulow: Ralph, let me ask you about the field. Has anyone caught your attention that maybe is a name that people aren't talking about enough or that is really exciting social conservative voters?

Reed: It's awfully early, but there are two that I'm hearing on the ground that are really getting a close look. One is Herman Cain, who is a terrific speaker and has a compelling personal testimony in addition to his conservative credentials. And the other is Michele Bachmann.

I think if they both go - and Cain's in and Bachmann looks like she's going to get in - they're both going to do extremely well among this constituency.

Reed then went on the predict that this event was not only going to change the lives of those in attendance, but the life of the nation as well ... which is the same thing he said last year:

Huntsman Signs Up For Faith and Freedom Conference

Republican presidential aspirants continue to flock to Ralph Reed’s Faith and Freedom Coalition. Reed today announced that former Utah governor and Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman will speak to the group’s Conference and Strategy Briefing on June 3rd. Other GOP presidential contenders addressing the gathering include Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Michele Bachmann, and Herman Cain, along with Donald Trump, House GOP leaders John Boehner, Kevin McCarthy, and Paul Ryan, and numerous Republican congressmen.

The Faith and Freedom Coalition seems to be the restoration of Reed’s Christian Coalition, and he has focused on building a presence in key primary and general election states like Iowa, Nevada, South Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida.

Despite Reed’s duplicitous and corrupt background, Republicans persistently seek his support. The Christian Broadcasting Network’s David Brody today profiled the group’s plans for the 2012 election and collaborations with the Tea Party movement:

"We anticipate we're going to knock on over 2 million doors," Reed, chairman of the Faith & Freedom Coalition, told CBN News.

"We're going to register between 1 million and 2 million new voters so we're going to add 1 to 2 million new voters," he predicted. "And then we'll end up contacting somewhere between 25 and 40 million voters."



The Faith & Freedom Coalition doesn't just focus on social issues. Leaders know that fiscal concerns are huge and will be a major priority but they don't plant to co-opt the Tea Party movement.

"We're saying to them you need to continue to be who you are as Tea Party leaders," conservative strategist Gary Marx told CBN News. "At the same time, there are areas where we can work together and be allied -- like the example of cutting abortion funding for groups like Planned Parenthood," he said.

Right Wing Leftovers

Reed's Infatuation With Trump Continues

For the last several weeks, Ralph Reed has been announcing the latest additions to his upcoming "Faith & Freedom Conference and Strategy Briefing" next month. 

He's been racking up a who's who of Republican and conservative leaders ... but today he made the biggest announcement yet:

I am pleased to announce that business leader, television star, best-selling author, and potential presidential candidate, Donald Trump is confirmed to address the Faith and Freedom Conference and Strategy Briefing in Washington, D.C., on June 4th.

It is good to see that Trump's oafish behavior of late has not soured the Republican establishment on him or dampened their willingness to be seen with him in any way.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • Texas Governor Rick Perry has issued a proclamation urging residents to pray for rain.
  • Read through this and tell me exactly where Ralph Reed "takes on the liberal media."
  • FRC is mobilizing activists to urge the Supreme Court to accept the case of Davenport v. American Atheists.
  • Speaking of FRC, Peter Sprigg is upset with proposed curriculum in Maryland that doesn't show gays as perverted miserable freaks.
  • Know how the Religious Right is always going on about European countries are shutting down the rights of Christians?
  • Finally, the quote of the day from Ken Hutcherson: "The Babylonian empire failed, the Persian Empire failed, the Greek Empire failed, and the Roman Empire was dispersed when the people failed to remember what made them great. The common denominator for the failure of all these world powers was the breakdown of the family." Really?  I'd really like to see some documentation for this claim.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • Speaker John Boehner announced that Paul Clement will defend DOMA and NOM is very happy.
  • It was reported that Donald Trump talked to Ralph Reed about running his campaign, but Reed says that is not so.
  • Right-wingers don't care when Glenn Beck spews crazy nonsense all day ... but they do care when he steals their crazy nonsense and doesn't give them credit.
  • Yet another member of Congress - Tim Huelskamp - has no qualms about joining Bryan Fischer on his radio program.
  • Mat Staver thinks it is perfectly okay for Nevada to ban those who do not "have a religious affiliation" from performing marriages.
  • Finally, is anyone surprised that The Oak Initiative eventually took a turn toward Birtherism?

GOP Congressmen Line-Up To Attend Ralph Reed's Conference

Leading Republicans have signed up to address the conference led by disgraced Religious Right activist Ralph Reed this summer in Washington. Following commitments by potential presidential candidates Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) and Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN), numerous Republican congressmen are now confirmed to speak to Reed’s 2011 Conference and Strategy Briefing.

Reed, who also plans to speak alongside presidential candidate Herman Cain and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) in Florida next week, has just announced a new list of speakers: Rep. Allen West (R-FL); Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO); Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX); Rep. Daniel Webster (R-FL); Rep. Tom Price (R-GA); Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX); Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (R-GA); Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA), and Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-SC).

The freshmen Congressmen slated to speak are strongly tied to the Religious Right: West’s anti-gay and anti-Muslim rhetoric has made him a darling of leaders like Pat Robertson; Hartzler has consistently fought against gay rights in both Congress and Missouri, and even wrote a book about tips for Religious Right activists running for office; Webster is a Christian Reconstructionist and close to David Barton and Phyllis Schlafly, and Mulvaney was a legislative leader of the far-right Palmetto Family Council.

Behold the Religious Right: Reed and Perkins Suggest Trump Could Win Support

Just when you start to think that your faith in the judgment of people like Ralph Reed and Tony Perkins could not possibly diminish any further, CBN's David Brody reports that both of them are taking Donald Trump's presidential campaign seriously enough to suggest he might actually garner some support from the Religious Right:

Ralph Reed, one of the top GOP strategists in the country and Chairman of the Faith and Freedom Coalition tells The Brody File, “There is a nascent and growing curiosity in the faith community about Trump. Evangelicals will like his pro-life and pro-marriage stances, combined with his business record and high-wattage celebrity all but guarantee he will get a close look from social conservatives as well as other Republican primary voters."

Tony Perkins, President of the Family Research Council is curious to hear more as well. “Given Donald Trump's background in the gambling industry and his flamboyancy one would not think he would be a fit with Evangelical voters. However, given the wide open field of candidates, strong statements that Trump has recently made on core social issues combined with an overarching desire to see a new occupant in the White House, he may find support among social conservatives.

Right Wing Leftovers

New Hire Suggests GOProud's Days a CPAC Are Numbered

Ever since various Religious Right groups boycotted CPAC over the inclusion of the gay conservative group GOProud, there have been a lot of questions about what direction the conference would take in the years to come. 

New new American Conservative Union Chairman Al Cardenas has already been suggesting that he is going to do what he can to bring the offended Religious Right groups back into the fold by limiting GOProud's involvement. 

And now comes word that Cardenas has now hired the executive director of Ralph Reed's Faith and Freedom Coalition to undertake the task of uniting the conservative movement on behalf of ACU:  

The American Conservative Union will announce the appointment of Gregg Keller to serve as its executive director, filling out the group’s new leadership team with a widely respected Midwestern political hand. Keller is a veteran of some of the toughest elections of the last decade: He was campaign manager for Missouri Sen. Jim Talent in 2006 and national coalitions director for Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign in 2008. Most recently, he has been executive director of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, the up-and-coming conservative group founded by Ralph Reed. ACU Chairman Al Cardenas, who took over the organization last month, hailed Keller’s selection in a statement: “With Gregg’s help, ACU will continue to unite social, fiscal and national security conservatives for the tremendous opportunities we have in 2012 and beyond.”

KELLER’S COMMENT: “I am excited to join the American Conservative Union at this crucial time for our conservative movement … I am especially looking forward to working with Chairman Cardenas and the ACU Board to help unite our movement and advance conservative positions, principles and policies.”

I think it is safe to assume that GOProud's days sticking a finger in the eye of the Religious Right at CPAC are coming to an end.

Reed: It Is Unfair For Conservatives To Be "Judged On Their Past"

Tonight, the Iowa affiliate of Ralph Reed's Faith and Freedom Coalition is hosting it's "Spring Kick-off Event" featuring Five potential presidential candidates - Herman Cain, Buddy Roemer, Rick Santorum, Tim Pawlenty and Newt Gingrich.

And Reed wants it known that social conservatives have no intention of riding in the "back of the bus":

The Iowa political season is set to kick off with Monday’s Faith and Freedom Coalition forum featuring a slew of potential 2012 hopefuls — an event that group’s national chairman says will show that social issues “shouldn’t ride in the back of the bus” in the Republican primaries.

“This is a reminder that in spite of what the polls say nationally about the most important issues, there are literally tens of millions of grassroots activists within the Republican Party who will play an exaggerated role in the nominating process,” coalition leader Ralph Reed Jr. told POLITICO.

He added that those activists “want to have a nominee who thinks that social [issues] shouldn’t ride in the back of the bus. They want to see... a leader in the party and in the country who can lead on more than one front at the same time.”

Given that Religious Right activist expect to be front and center, you would expect that would be bad news for Gingrich who, with his checkered past, might have some trouble convincing these "family values" activists that he is worthy of their support ... but Reed insists that that is not the case at all:

“I just reject the argument that ... Newt's past would be a liability,” said Ralph Reed, the former Christian Coalition chief. “I think as long as he’s prepared to confront those challenges and he can do so in an authentic way, people’s (inclination) will be to be forgiving. Who wants to be judged on their past? Everybody has had issues.”

Gee, Reed doesn't think that Religious Right leaders ought to be "judged on their past"?  I wonder why that would be?

Right Wing Leftovers

  • You know, maybe Ralph Reed isn't the best person to be defending Tom DeLay's money laundering scheme.
  • Gayle Ruzicka of the Utah Eagle Forum says Gay-Straight Alliances are "a gay recruiting tool."
  • Rep. Michele Bachmann says liberals experts will be welcome at her classes on the Constitution.  I'm sure.  Does she plan on bringing them in as instructors?
  • The ACU's David Keene does not seem overly concerned about the Religious Right boycott of CPAC.
  • Finally, get ready for Peter LaBarbera's next anti-gay "Truth Academy" to be held April 1-2 in Columbus, OH.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • Phyllis Schlafly maintains that “nobody’s stopping [gay couples] from shacking up,” the “problem is they are trying to make us respect them.”
  • Religious Right leaders continue to lavish praise on potential presidential candidate and Indiana Congressman Mike Pence (R-IN).
  • Ralph Reed and talk show host Mike Gallagher are headlining a pro-school vouchers event in Orlando to lead “the revolution to restore America’s exceptionalism” in January.
  • After the Alaska Supreme Court ruled against his appeal, Joe Miller said he won’t stop Lisa Murkowski’s reelection from being certified but will continue to appeal his case.
  • Elaine Donnelly says that Don’t Ask Don’t Tell repeal “means that others will have to get used to the idea of being exposed to people who may be sexually attracted to them.”
  • Coral Ridge Ministries’ Karen Gushta takes to the AFA's news site to blast the National Science Teachers Association for their “bias” against teaching creationism in public schools.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • What does Liberty University have in common with companies like Microsoft and Google?  A AA rating which allowed it to raise $120 million through the sale of bonds yesterday.
  • Al Mohler says that claims that Jesus will return on May 21, 2011 is an "embarrassment" to the Christian Church.
  • Ralph Reed says President Obama betrayed his principles with the tax cut compromise. Of course, Reed exploited his Christian allies on behalf of Jack Abramoff and gambling interests. 
  • Mike Huckabee is still mad that he gets pigeonholed as the "faith candidate."
  • Finally, mark your calendars because it looks like the Freedom Federation will be hosting another Awakening conference in April 2011.

Reed: George Allen Was "Smeared" For His "Macaca" Slur

My two favorite Religious Right political prognosticators - Richard Land and Ralph Reed - teamed up recently to discuss the recent election results and the exchange was pretty much what one would expect, with Reed declaring that George Allen was "smeared" by the Washington Post for his infamous "Macaca" incident and Land proclaiming that the 2006 and 2008 elections where Republicans lost were some sort of anomaly:

Reed: Jim Webb in Virginia, who narrowly defeated George Allen after he was, in my view, smeared by the Washington Post and other liberal media outlets for the alleged, you know, slur of macaca ...

Land: 2006 and 2008 were aberrations. This is a return to the basic voting pattern of 2004 where white evangelicals made up 27% of all the people who voted and they voted 78% for Bush.

Reed: And we saw, as you accurately indicate, we saw a dip in the turn out of those voters and a little bit of a dip in the margin of those voters for Republican candidates.

My view is that's because we just weren't running the kind of candidates that they could get excited about. But if you offer a Marco Rubio, or you offer a Dan Webster, or you offer those kind of candidates, they are going to turn those voters out.

That sort of assessment must come as a real surprise to all of those right-wing candidates who lost in 2006 and 2008 like Rick Santorum who must have been one of those candidates that Religious Right voters just couldn't get excited about. 

Reed: Obama Need To Be More "Christ-Like," Like Sarah Palin

For some reason, Ralph Reed still has a career in politics and a corresponding platform from which he can share his "expertise" about how President Obama really needs to be, in addition to a political leader, a Christian leader ... kind of like Sarah Palin

Democrats would have had fewer losses on election Tuesday if President Obama had embraced a "Christ-like model of leadership," says Ralph Reed, founder and chairman of the Faith and Freedom Coalition. Reed, who used to run Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition, says a good leader is one who provides not just the "bread, but also the bread of life" for his constituents.

"Even if you bring the capital-gains tax down to zero," create more jobs, and turn the economy around, he argues, Obama still needs to give an "eternal" set of values, such as opposing abortion and same-sex marriage.

So who would be a Christ-like GOP challenger to Obama in 2012? Reed says his friend, Sarah Palin.

Allow me to just point out, yet again, that Reed's own political aspirations collapsed when it was revealed that he knowingly took large amounts of gambling money to dupe his erstwhile Religious Right associates into mobilizing on behalf of measures that benefited the gambling interests of Jack Abramoff's clients ... work which Reed proclaims "outstanding" and of which he remains "proud" to this day.

Get To Know Herman Cain, The Next President of the United States

Are you familiar with the name Herman Cain? 

We first wrote about him when he came to our attention thank to his involvement with a series of outrageous election ads back in 2006:

A group called America’s PAC has raised almost $1 million to run highly inflammatory radio ads targeting African American voters, urging them to vote Republican in November, according to the New York Sun.

One ad, called “Don’t Go There,” features an exchange between two men. The first man says the second man has no reason to vote Republican because he is unemployed, an adulterer, and won’t serve in the military, and finally he comes to abortion:

Michael: And if you make a little mistake with one of your ho’s, you’ll want to dispose of that problem toot sweet, no questions asked, right?

Dennis: Naw, that’s too cold. I don’t snuff my own seed …

Michael: Huh. Really? (pause) Well, maybe you do have a reason to vote Republican!

Another ad on abortion accuses the “Democrat Party” of “decimating our people” by supporting abortion laws. Over the sound of a thunderstorm and a crying baby, a woman says, “Democrats say they want our votes. Why don’t they want our lives?”

In another ad, “Hazardous Dukes,” the “Michael” character says David Duke visited Syria to support terrorists in Iraq. The speaker continues,

Now, I can understand why a Ku Klux Klan cracker like David Duke makes nice with the terrorists. They fight voting rights in Iraq, just like he does back home. But what I want to know is why so many of the Democrat politicians I helped elect are on the same side of the Iraq war as David Duke.

Duke, the founder of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, was a Republican state representative in Louisiana and ran for governor as a Republican.

Other ads blame Democrats for Hurricane Katrina and voting irregularities in Florida in 2000, call Social Security “the most discriminatory government program we have,” invoke Martin Luther King, and assert that “it’s only the Republicans who support our troops.”

Since then, he's been paling around with Ralph Reed and hosting a daily radio program for the American Family Association ... and today he told the AFA's spokesbigot Bryan Fischer and co-host that based on the midterm election results, the climate just might be perfect for his own presidential run:

So we have to look forward to.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • Corrupt huckster Ralph Reed assures us that thrice-married Newt Gingrich's religious transformation is the real deal.
  • Speaking of Reed, here is fifteen minutes of him bloviating about the upcoming election.
  • On, and Sarah Palin recorded robocalls for Reed's new organization.
  • Jim Garlow is an expert on the afterlife and says Matt Damon's movie gets it all wrong.
  • Why CNS thinks anyone cares what Bill Dononhue thinks about the new Superman is beyond me.
  • Bryan Fischer says that President Obama's appearance on "The Daily Show" was "one of the lowest points in the history of the presidency."
  • Finally, Chuck Colson contemplates the possibility of social conservatives launching a third party - I, for one, hope that they do:

Taking the Tea Party Seriously

 In less than two years, the Tea Party movement emerged with an angry shout, became a major player in the national debate over health care reform, toppled incumbent senators and defeated candidates backed by the GOP establishment, and pushed radically right-wing views about the role of government into public debate. And they’re about to see a number of their candidates elected to Congress.

For a while last year, journalists and other political observers weren’t sure whether to take the Tea Party movement seriously as a force in American politics. But Lawrence Rosenthal, head of the Center for Comparative Study of Right-Wing Institutions at the University of California Berkeley, and his colleague Christine Trost decided it was worth a serious look. Last Friday, the Center hosted Fractures, Alliances and Mobilization in the Age of Obama: Emerging Analyses of the Tea Party Movement, the first academic conference on the topic.  It was an interdisciplinary event, featuring historians, sociologists, political scientists, political theorists, scholars of race and gender, and journalists, each taking a look at the movement from a different angle. As a senior fellow at PFAW Foundation, I made a presentation on the connections between the Tea Party and the Religious Right at the leadership, activist, ideological, and political levels.
 
In his introductory remarks, Rosenthal emphasized the “emerging” nature of the work being presented. The Tea Party is new to the political scene, and the upcoming elections and their aftermath will tell us a lot more about its impact.  It’s impossible to do justice to a day-long conference in a short blog post, so  I’ll mention just a few of the presentations that struck me as particularly interesting.   If you’re interested in more, you can find the conference agenda here, and Berkeley folks expect video of the presentations to be available online shortly at the Center’s website. A volume of conference papers is planned for next year.
 
A few items from my notes, with apologies to any scholar who feels I’m off-point with any of these hyper-condensed items:
  • From Rosenthal’s opening remarks, a comparison of the role Fox News has played in the Tea Party’s rise with the role of Berlusconi’s media empire in his rise to political power in Italy.
  • From the keynote address by author Rick Perlstein, a reminder that angry reaction to liberal political ascendancy is a regular part of our history, and that the lack of a robust left-wing populism opens the door to the dangers that are particular to right-wing extremism.   
  • Several scholars reporting that one-or-the-other descriptions of the movement (grassroots or Astroturf?) are usually too simplistic; at this point the movement is a fluid mixture not easily categorized.
  • Professor Christopher Parker from the University of Washington presented polling data showing that supporters of the Tea Party movement are more likely to harbor negative attitudes toward Blacks, Latinos, and gay people.
  • Professor Martin Cohen from James Madison University presented a fascinating look at another movement that built power within the GOP: he analyzed the effectiveness and impact of the Religious Right’s “first wave” – think Falwell and Moral Majority – and its “second wave” – think Ralph Reed and the Christian Coalition. He suggested that the Tea Party movement currently sounds more like the first wave in the level of public anger and hostility to compromise, and argues that the movement would have a bigger impact if it takes some lessons from the second wave. (Lessons, by the way, that Reed himself is happily imparting through his new Faith and Freedom Coalition)
  • Professor Alan Abromowitz from Emory University presented evidence that the increasing partisanship of recent decades set the stage for the kind of no-compromise politics of the Tea Party crowd.  Since the 1970s, Republicans have had steadily smaller regard for Democratic presidential candidates, with the biggest fall among the most active.
  • Charles Postrel, San Francisco State University historian and award-winning author, challenged the use of the term “populism” in connection with a movement that is drawing inspiration from the likes of the John Birch Society and right-wing author Cleon Skousen, who is being heavily promoted by Glenn Beck.
  • Chip Berlet, who analyzes right-wing movements for Political Research Associates, discussed ways that right-wing populists use demonization, scapegoating, and conspiracy theories to justify "apocalyptic aggression."
  • Lisa Disch, a University of Michigan professor of political science and women’s studies, gave a fascinating “contrarian” analysis that described the Tea Party and the racial resentments evident in the movement as an outgrowth of the New Deal rather than a rejection of it.
  • Devin Burghart, Vice President for the Institute for Research & Education on Human Rights, discussed the group’s recent report, Tea Party Nationalism, and its findings about the infiltration of local Tea Party groups by racist and anti-immigrant activists.
The Berkeley conference raised a lot of questions that will provide scholars with avenues for additional research, including greater analysis of the relationships between the grassroots and grasstops of the movement.
 
One journalist who has done serious investigative work along those lines is AlterNet’s Washington Bureau Chief Adele Stan (full disclosure – I have written articles for AlterNet and Stan). Stan and AlterNet’s Don Hazen have edited Dangerous Brew: Exposing the Tea Party's Agenda to Take Over America. Dangerous Brew is an anthology of writing from AlterNet contributors on the Tea Party movement.  
 
On Monday night, Stan was joined by Sarah Posner, associate editor at online magazine Religion Dispatches (more disclosure: I serve on the advisory council and have written for RD) and Stephanie Mencimer of Mother Jones magazine for a conversation about the book and the movement at Washington, D.C.’s Busboys & Poets.  Their conversation touched on some of the same themes discussed in Berkeley, including the outsized role played by News Corp, the impact of economic and cultural anxieties, and the need for progressives to stop being surprised when the far right rises from its dormancy whenever liberals gain political power. 
 
Posner discussed the interconnections between the Religious Right and Tea Party movements. Mencimer, who has spent a lot of time on the road getting to know Tea Party members, encouraged progressives to recognize that, whatever the motivations and machinations of the corporate interests and GOP strategists who are working to hijack the movement to their own purposes, many Tea Party activists are individuals motivated by love of country and excited about their first intense experience of democratic participation. Stan encouraged members of the diverse crowd, representing many strains of the progressive movement, to introduce themselves to others in the room, because the energized Tea Party movement is going to give progressive activists a lot of reasons to get to know each other in the coming years.
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Ralph Reed Posts Archive

Brian Tashman, Monday 07/15/2013, 11:25am
Faith and Freedom Coalition head Ralph Reed recently chatted with Sarah Palin about her new book on the manufactured “War on Christmas,” which doesn’t actually exist but is an easy way for conservative activists to stoke fears and make money. Palin told Reed that the book will include the “traditions of our family that are pretty unique because we are from Alaska and live near the North Pole so we have access to Santa Claus and all the good things that come with Christmas.” But the “heart of the book” will focus on revealing “the truth about... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Thursday 06/20/2013, 2:48pm
Here’s a question for Ralph Reed and the ‘Teavangelical’ wing of the conservative movement: how can you portray yourselves as serious about governing when the keynote speakers at last week’s “Road to Majority” conference were Donald Trump and Sarah Palin? Palin’s conference-closing remarks on Saturday featured a breathtakingly offensive joke about the Syrian civil war, which has taken an estimated 100,000 lives. She said we should just “let Allah sort it out.” Palin also had choice words for the bipartisan immigration reform bill moving... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Monday 06/17/2013, 10:25am
The immigration divide evident from the opening hours of the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference became even more stark as the conference went on.  During a Friday afternoon breakout session on outreach to minorities, called “The True Rainbow Coalition: Building an Organization in Minority Faith Communities,” Hispanic conservatives went after Phyllis Schlafly, Eagle Forum, and other speakers who had trashed the immigration reform bill during the morning session. Panelist Adryana Boyne, director of VOCES Action who is also promoting... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Friday 06/14/2013, 2:02pm
A group of conservative evangelical leaders has been pushing their fellow conservatives to embrace immigration reform, in part as a way to make the Religious Right and the Republican Party more appealing to the nation’s growing Latino population. Ralph Reed has been among those supporting the idea of a comprehensive reform bill, but at his Faith & Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference in Washington DC, many of the “Teavangelical” activists – people who are part of both the Tea Party and Religious Right movement – aren’t... MORE >
Peter Montgomery, Thursday 06/13/2013, 4:27pm
Four of the Tea Party’s favorite senators – Rand Paul of Kentucky, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah, and Marco Rubio of Florida – addressed the kick-off lunch for this year’s “Road to Majority” conference, which is sponsored by Ralph Reed’s Faith & Freedom Coalition. Rand Paul made his case for a humbler foreign policy, suggesting that anti-abortion “pro-life” advocates should also think about the lives of 18- and 19-year old soldiers sent abroad before applauding a politician who talks with bravado about pre-emptive wars.... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Tuesday 06/04/2013, 10:15am
A new report released by the College Republican National Committee has been making waves this week for its stern warning that the GOP’s appeal is foundering among young voters. Chris Moody notes that the group explicitly mentioned the party’s opposition to gay rights as a reason why young voters are repelled by the party: "[T]he conventional wisdom is right," the study's authors write in a section on how Republicans should approach marriage policy for gay and lesbian couples. "Young people are unlikely to view homosexuality as morally wrong, and they lean... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 05/23/2013, 5:29pm
Former U.S. Rep. and militant anti-immigration activist Tom Tancredo is running for governor of Colorado. FRC prays for the success of its Watchmen on the Wall conference. Ralph Reed's Faith and Freedom Coalition will honor Pat Robertson with a lifetime achievement award at the Road to Majority conference. Focus on the Family's Tom Minnery wonders "how many feminists know who it was who gave us the very name 'woman' (Genesis 1:26)." Finally, Bryan Fischer predicts that the Boy Scouts of America will reject the proposal to end the ban on gay scouts... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Tuesday 05/14/2013, 1:31pm
According to a report in World Magazine, the Boy Scouts of America has been paying Ralph Reed to set up meetings between Christian conservative leaders and BSA officials who support the resolution ending the ban on gay scouts. Reed insists that he does not support the proposed policy change but is simply serving as a "peacemaker" between the two sides in an effort to "facilitate a dialogue."  Not surprisingly, opponents of the change are not buying Reed's defense: WORLD learned that Reed, founder of the Christian Coalition and now president of the Faith and... MORE >