Bryan Fischer

Fischer Family Values: 'How Bryan Fischer Turned on a Friend'

Last week we told you about an excellent profile of Bryan Fischer in the New Yorker and Fischer’s predictably over-the-top and inaccurate attacks on the article and author, Jane Mayer. In the wake of those attacks, Mayer has posted a follow-up blog post, “Have Not Love: How Bryan Fischer Turned on a Friend,” that sets the record straight and explores the twisted family values of Fischer, a so-called family values advocate: 

As I worked on my profile of the influential conservative radio-host Bryan Fischer, I was struck by the difference between the “pro-family” values he espouses and some of the choices he has made in his own life. For example, Fischer has not seen his only sibling in something like a decade—a sister with serious health problems who lives on social security and welfare disability payments. Perhaps more revealing, though, is the broken friendship between Fischer and another conservative Christian activist, Dennis Mansfield.
 
After the article came out, Fischer accused me of misrepresenting an anecdote concerning his relationship with Mansfield. Since then, Mansfield has weighed in on his own blog to defend the accuracy of the New Yorker story, and expanded on what he calls Fischer’s “divisive” politics as a dead end for this country.
Mansfield, who unsuccessfully ran for Congress, parted ways with Fischer after his son was arrested for drug possession:
The public arrest torpedoed Mansfield’s congressional bid. More importantly, he says, the episode, and the subsequent humility he learned from his son’s struggle, caused him to reëxamine the way in which he was using his Christian faith as a cudgel in politics. As Mansfield told me, he concluded that “faith-based conservatives are either purposefully or inadvertently looking punitively at other people” rather than “lifting each other up.”
 
While Mansfield’s family crisis caused him to reassess his earlier self-righteousness, Fischer, he says, reacted to it heartlessly, and told Mansfield that he was no longer fit to be an elder at the church where Fischer was preaching, the Community Church of the Valley, in Boise, Idaho. 
Writing on his blog last Thursday, Mansfield said this about Fischer:
Pushing your own agenda using the veil of religion has been used all throughout history. Today is no exception, and individuals in the evangelical community do it as much as anyone else. When someone wraps their own hate speech in a "god blanket" it makes it easier for a subset of people to accept, and eventually it may even gather a following. The problem is that anyone outside of that subset is turned away from not only that particular subset, but from the entire religion.
Mayer sees echoes in the generational divide within the evangelical community of Fischer and Mansfield’s opposing outlooks:
The contrast between Mansfield’s message and Fischer’s in some ways captures a larger split within the evangelical Christian movement, concerning how much tolerance to show towards those who in the past may have been treated as outliers, including homosexuals. Polls of younger evangelicals, like those of younger voters of almost all stripes, show growing acceptance of gay rights, including same-sex marriage. Times, and attitudes, are changing.
Let’s hope she’s right about the younger generation being more like Mansfield than Fischer.

 

Fischer: Boy Scouts Must Ban Gay Scout Leaders (i.e. 'Homosexual Pedophiles Like This Jerry Sandusky')

Recently it was reported that the national executive council of the Boy Scouts of America would be voting on a resolution next year that would change the organization's policy which bans gay Scouts and troop leaders.

On Friday's radio program, Bryan Fischer predicted that the Boy Scouts were not going to change the policy because doing so would "mean the end of the Boy Scouts" since parents would never allow their children to join unless they are positive that "homosexual pedophiles like this Jerry Sandusky" were being kept out of the organization:  

Fischer: You Cannot Reason with Gays Because God has Given Them Over to Depraved Minds

The other day we posted a clip of AFA's Buster Wilson musing about whether the recent repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell might be playing some role in the rise in suicides among members of the Armed Services.

After we posted the video, Evan Hurst at Truth Wins Out picked it up and posted on their blog as well and his post caught the attention of Wilson, who then showed up in the comments to accuse them of deceptively editing the video and defend his remarks, which then set off a long debate in the comments.

Yesterday, Bryan Fisher cited the debate between Wilson and the folks over at TWO as proof that "you cannot reason with these people because they are impervious to facts, they are impervious to logic, they are impervious to reason, they are impervious to history, they are impervious to the truth."  And the reason that gays and liberals and the like cannot be reasoned with is because God has given them over to a "depraved mind," so "their thinking is messed up [and] they don't process information the way normal people process information": 

Bryan Fischer Goes Ballistic over New Yorker Profile

Yesterday we wrote about an excellent, and in-depth, profile of Bryan Fischer by veteran reporter Jane Mayer in this week’s New Yorker. Fischer took to his radio show to respond to the piece, and let’s just say it seems to have hit a nerve. If you weren’t already planning on reading it, you’ll definitely want to after watching Fischer get so worked up about it (highlights below and full video here):  

Fischer variably called the profile “shoddy,” “laughably bad,” “juvenile,” “poorly written,” “unprofessional,” “distorted, misleading, false, and deceptive,” “offensively bad,” and “an embarrassingly bad piece of journalism” that is “like something you would get in a middle school journalism class.” He said that Mayer “ought to be ashamed of herself” and is an “inexcusably bad journalist.”
 
Fischer, of course, doth protest too much. He threw around a lot of names and accusations but did nothing to call into question the veracity or quality of the article. And he seemed genuinely shocked that a reporter would take the time to speak with people he’s known throughout his life, and that some of those people might not agree with him or hold him in the same high esteem he holds himself. “This was my own life, she’s talking about my life here,” he complained.
 
“If I was a journalist,” said Fischer, “I'd be embarrassed frankly to be associated with a piece of tripe like this.” But I think it’s safe to say that he has a weak grasp on what journalism is. Regardless, Fischer says he’s going to take his ball and go home: “This is it. I am never ever gonna cooperate with an organ of the mainstream media for a profile on me ever again.”
 

Fischer: Allowing Gay Adoption is 'a Form of Sexual Abuse'

It has been a few days since Bryan Fischer went off on a good old fashioned anti-gay rant, but today he was back in peak form, citing a bunk study that claims that kids raised in same-sex households suffer as adults as proof that gays are incapable of forming lasting, loving relationship while declaring that people who believe in the theory of evolution should be most opposed to gay unions because gay couples cannot procreate ... and then, just for good measure, topping it all of by declaring that allowing gay parents to adopt is "a form of sexual abuse":

Bryan Fischer in the New Yorker: Extreme, Rigid and the Product of a Broken Home

The New Yorker is out with an excellent new piece by Jane Mayer that explores how Bryan Fischer came to be the bigoted firebrand known so well to readers of this blog. Over the years we’ve covered a seemingly endless stream of outrages by Fischer, who serves as American Family Association’s Director of Issue Analysis and host of “Focal Point” on AFA’s radio network. Yet Fischer only recently emerged on the national scene when he led the successful effort to oust an openly gay spokesman from the Romney campaign.

The New Yorker profile, appropriately titled “Bully Pulpit,” is Fischer’s first national media close-up, and the results are none too pretty. Mayer spoke with former and current friends and co-workers of Fischer, and the portrait that consistently emerges is of an extreme and rigid man who consistently drives friends away and is compensating, to this day, for childhood traumas.
 
                 (Photo by Alec Soth for the New Yorker)         
 
As you would expect, the article includes a number of outrageous and offensive remarks and claims made by Fischer, both to Mayer and previously (many of which were first reported on this blog). Here are some notable examples from the profile:
  • “Fischer declared that ‘homosexuality gave us Adolf Hitler, and homosexuals in the military gave us the Brown Shirts, the Nazi war machine, and six million dead Jews.’
  • “Like the saying goes, ‘I’ve never met an ex- black, but I’ve met a lot of ex-gays.’ If one person can do it, two people can do it.”
  • “He then denied, as he does routinely, that H.I.V. causes AIDS, calling it a ‘harmless passenger virus.’”
  • “Fischer thinks that Islam is a violent religion, and argues that Muslims should be stopped from immigrating and barred from serving in the U.S. military. He believes that the country was a Christian nation when the Bill of Rights was written, and therefore non-Christians ‘have no First Amendment right to the free exercise of religion.’ He has said that Native Americans are ‘morally disqualified’ from ruling America, and that African-American welfare recipients ‘rut like rabbits.’”
  • “Obama, he has said, ‘despises the Constitution” and “nurtures a hatred for the white man.’”
  • “Fischer advised a caller that, in some instances, a child as young as six months could be spanked.”
Readers who are already familiar with Fischer’s extremism will likely be much more interested in the details about how he came to be what he is today, starting with his upbringing and relationship with his parents:
Fischer’s political activism, however, began years before the advent of same-sex-marriage laws. In fact, his preoccupation with family dysfunction seems to have started with his own. Though Fischer loves to talk, he does not like to talk about his childhood, and spoke about it only grudgingly. He was born in Oklahoma City, in 1951, and his father, John, a descendant of German Mennonites, was a Conservative Baptist minister whose pacifism was so strict that he became a conscientious objector during the Second World War—a choice that makes Fischer uncomfortable. […]
 
Fischer didn’t volunteer anything about his mother, but, when pressed, said, “My parents divorced when I was about twenty. It just rocked my world.” His mother, who worked as an interior decorator at a furniture store, was “chronically late,” and the bus driver on her route to work would always hold the bus for her. Eventually, he said, “my mom fell for the bus driver,” deserting him, his father, and his younger sister. “I don’t want to go into it,” Fischer said. “But I saw the devastating impact it had on other people in my immediate family.” Asked how his father fared, Fischer turned away, then said, “He looked like an Auschwitz survivor. It was akin to that ordeal.”
 
Dennis Mansfield, a Christian conservative who was friends with Fischer for twenty years, said that Fischer also “had a deep-rooted disappointment in his father, for not being strong enough.”
Later, as a student at Stanford, Fischer gravitated to David Roper, a chaplain at the school, and began attending his evangelical church in Palo Alto. Fischer told Mayer that he was attracted by the “manliness” of the church: “It was the first time I’d been around a real muscular Christianity,” he told me. “It had a kind of strength and virility to it that would appeal to men.” Roper told Mayer he found this characterization “odd” and is no longer close to Fischer.
 
Manliness and strength continued to be major forces – and sources of strife – in Fischer’s life. Roper left Palo Alto in 1978 and recruited Fischer and Terry Papé, a fellow student, to join him in Boise after they graduated. In 1993, Roper retired and chose Papé to lead the congregation, passing over Fischer, who was crushed. Manliness was to blame:
“Bryan was very popular when he came to Cole,” Papé recalled. “But, over time, those relationships were strained, because of his very strong personality. When it comes to his perspective, it’s very difficult to get him to budge. He loves a good argument, but he doesn’t like being persuaded he might be wrong.” In 1993, Fischer was crushed when Roper retired and endorsed a different successor. […]
 
But friction had grown between the two men—and between Fischer and the congregation— over various doctrinal issues. “The central issue was gender,” Fischer told me. The church, he said, had “adopted policies that would have allowed women to exercise authority over men.” He opposed this, citing the Apostle Paul.
Fischer then started his own church in Boise, the Community Church of the Valley, and pursued a hard line on gender and family issues:
In church, Fischer preached that it might be preferable if Americans married upon becoming sexually mature. “I’m not saying go out and get your fifteen-year-old engaged,” he said. But he argued that “we have artificially delayed the age at which people are expected to marry,” and observed, “Mary, the mother of Christ, was probably a teen-ager when she was betrothed to Joseph.” In another sermon, he preached that women were equal to men in worth but “not equal in authority.”
 
“Somebody’s got to have the tie-breaking vote,” he explained to me. “According to God, that’s the husband and father.”
Fischer was appointed in 2001 as the chaplain of the Idaho Senate and began developing a statewide reputation for hard-right political activism. He also alienated many people, including Dennis Mansfield, an elder at his church and a longtime friend, who told Mayer about a pattern he noticed over the years: Fischer would “develop a closeness to a friend and then, as soon as they had a disagreement, they’d be cut adrift.”
 
Four years later, Fischer was kicked out on the street by his own congregation – again manliness was to blame:
“It was the gender issue again,” Fischer told me. “Because of my Scriptural convictions, I wasn’t able to budge. A female friend of the wife of an elder wanted a leadership role. I felt those roles should be reserved for men… . When I objected, they said, ‘You’re fired.’ It was very abrupt. I didn’t know what I was going to do next. It was very painful.” 
Fischer then fell into full-time political activism, founding the Idaho Values Alliance, which in 2007 became the state chapter of the American Family Association. Two years later he moved to Tupelo, MS to take on his current roles at AFA’s headquarters, which features a “statue of a fetus enshrined in a heart and a shoulder-high stone tablet inscribed with the Ten Commandments” out front.
 
Mayer’s profile provides an interesting look inside AFA, the tax-exempt and supposedly nonpartisan organization behind American Family Radio, which “comprises two hundred stations in thirty-five states.” At one point, Fischer’s producer began laughing after saying that “we have to be careful, because we’re not allowed to endorse.”
 
Mayer also relays a story about how AFA president Tim Wildmon texted Fischer during an on-air tirade about Newt Gingrich’s infidelities to warn him that “he might be alienating listeners.” This anecdote caught my attention because we’ve noted instances in the past where AFA has censored and edited Fischer’s articles on their website. Could it be that Fischer is on course to alienate yet another friend and benefactor? Only time will tell.

 

Fischer: Women Have 'Far More Influence' on the World by Staying Home and Raising Children

Last week, Bryan Fischer was making his case, yet again, that it is liberals who hate women ... especially stay at home moms. This prompted Fischer to go off on a tangent and declare that women can have more influence staying home and raising the next generation of leader than she can by "going out in the world and making her mark out there":

It's not possible to overestimate that value that stay-at-home moms, what they contribute to society by investing their full energies in the children. Where does the next generation of leaders come from? It comes from moms, and dads, who are invested in the lives of their children. So a woman can have far more influence, far more significant impact on the world by giving herself wholly to growing her children up to be responsible, mature adults than she can by going out in the world and making her mark out there.

The implication here, of course, is that "the next generation of leaders" - and every generation of leaders, for that matter -  will be men since every woman should be at home raising children instead of "going out in the world and making her mark out there."

Fischer: If Gays Aren't Discriminated Against, Christians Will Be

Bryan Fischer has long made clear his belief  that gay rights and liberty are incompatible and cannot coexist because every advance of the gay agenda comes at the expense of religious liberty. 

But yesterday he took things a step further, declaring that gay marriage would mean the end of the First Amendment and tied that back to his assertion that "it is altogether right to discriminate against homosexual behavior" warning that if gays are not the ones being discriminated against, then Christians will be:

Conservatives Incensed by Court Ruling on Anti-Gay Discrimination

In New Mexico today the state Court of Appeals upheld decisions by the state’s Human Rights Commission and a district court and found that a photography business which refused to photograph a same-sex couple’s commitment ceremony violated the state’s Human Rights Act, which declares that public accommodations like photo studios can’t discriminate on the basis of “race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or sexual orientation, gender identity, or physical or mental handicap.” The court rejected the business’s claim that they are like a black photography company which wouldn’t want to photograph a Ku Klux Klan rally, pointing out that the “Ku Klux Klan is not a protected class. Sexual orientation, however, is protected.” The right-wing Alliance Defense Fund represented the couple and pledged to repeal the decision.

American Family Association’s Tim Wildmon and the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins said the case points to the danger of the “homosexual agenda.” “Folks, it’s coming to your town, the homosexual agenda, their social and political movement is coming to your town, you can’t avoid it,” Wildmon said:

AFA spokesman Bryan Fischer claimed that New Mexico “kicked out” the First Amendment, and said the further proof that homosexuality and freedom are incompatible:

I just cannot exaggerate the reality of what we face; we have got to come to grips with the fact that in America we are going to have to choose between homosexuality and religious liberty. You can just ask Elaine Huguenin, this Christian photographer in New Mexico, she is not even being allowed by the Court of Appeals in the state of New Mexico to make her own business decisions, to decide who she would like to do business with.



You can see right away the entire First Amendment has just been kicked out of New Mexico, the First Amendment is a worthless scrap of paper now in the state of New Mexico, no respect for freedom of religion, no respect for freedom of speech, no respect for freedom of association. That’s what’s at risk here, ladies and gentlemen, I am not exaggerating this: we have to choose as a nation, it’s either homosexuality or religious liberty, homosexuality or freedom of speech, homosexuality or freedom of association, we are going to have to choose.

Gary Bauer in an email to members of Campaign for Working Families lamented, “In New Mexico, the private bedroom behaviors of homosexuals trump religious freedom”:

For six years the Christian owners of a small photography business have fought the state of New Mexico for violating their religious liberty. At issue in this case was whether the owners would be forced to photograph a homosexual "marriage." When the couple refused, New Mexico's Civil Rights Commission accused them of discrimination and slapped them with a $7,000 fine. So the couple sued.

Last week, an appeals court upheld the Civil Rights Commission's fine ruling that religious freedom could not be the basis for discriminating against "protected classes," including homosexuals. According to one report, attorneys for the Christian couple asked the court to consider the example of a black photographer being asked to photograph a KKK rally. The judge was unmoved. In New Mexico, the private bedroom behaviors of homosexuals trump religious freedom.

My friends, I know the economy is front and center in this election, but the culture war is very real. This election will have tremendous consequences for the values we will pass on to our children and grandchildren. I cannot stress enough just how important it is for every conservative to vote this November.

Fischer: 'It is Altogether Right to Discriminate Against Homosexual Behavior'

On Friday, Brian wrote a post taking note of a recent column by Bryan Fischer in which he called on conservatives to "reclaim the ‘D’ word" and begin to boldly defend the practice of discriminating against gays and lesbians.

As Fischer normally does whenever he posts a new piece, he ended up discussing it later that day during his radio program where he made the case that "it is altogether right to discriminate against homosexual behavior" because homosexuality is not something that should be accepted by "any rational society":

Fischer & Beisner Describe the Doctrines of the Religion of Environmentalism

On Bryan Fischer's radio program yesterday, Fischer and Cal Beisner discussed how environmentalism was becoming the established religion in America. 

How exactly is environmentalism a religion, you ask? Well, as Beisner explained, it has its own doctrines, its own holy day (Earth Day,) its own food taboos, sacrifice rituals (recycling,) paradoxical beliefs, sacred structures (recycling bins,) and it proselytizes.  And, as Fischer added, just like with the early church, heretics (i.e. global warming deniers like Fischer and Beisner) are punished and excommunicated:

Bryan Fischer Works to 'Reclaim the 'D' Word' to Promote Anti-Gay Discrimination

Time and time again American Family Association spokesman Bryan Fischer has advocated for the criminalization of homosexuality, and has been quite disturbed by the recent repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and court rulings that found DOMA to be unconstitutional. So today he posted a column arguing for a new campaign to “reclaim the ‘D’ word”—discrimination—and saying that government should discriminate against gays and lesbians to stop them from “destroying themselves through non-normative sexual behavior.”

Fischer claims that it is ironic that gays don’t face discrimination even as the government wages an “all-out war against cigarette smoking,” condemns “pedophilia, rape, bestiality” and punishes people who “burgle houses, drive while drunk, eat the faces off homeless people, gun down servicemen on military bases, embezzle funds from employers or clients, or beat their wives.”

Public policy is about discriminating against behaviors that are socially destructive and corrosive to the social fabric. So, we rightly discriminate against people who rip off convenience stores, burgle houses, drive while drunk, eat the faces off homeless people, gun down servicemen on military bases, embezzle funds from employers or clients, or beat their wives.



We discriminate against adults, even priests, who have sex with children. We discriminate against teachers who have affairs with students. We discriminate against teachers who moonlight in the porn industry. We discriminate against students who engage in sexting. We discriminate against rapists. We discriminate against those who expose sexual partners unknowingly to the AIDS virus. We discriminate against those adults who commit statutory rape against minors. We discriminate against homosexuals and prostitutes by refusing to allow them to give blood.

The point is this: we discriminate against sexually immoral and inappropriate behavior all the time, and homosexual behavior is sexually immoral and inappropriate.

As the president of the American Family Association, Tim Wildmon, has often said, homosexual behavior is “immoral, unnatural and unhealthy.” It is contrary to “the Laws of Nature and Nature’s God,” as the Founders would have put it. It puts the human body to sexual uses which are utterly contrary to the way in which the human body is designed. And it is accompanied by a raft of pathologies, including HIV/AIDS and a host of other debilitating sexually transmitted diseases. It shortens the lifespan of those who engage in it by as much as 30 years.

In other words, this is behavior that no rational society should ever condone, endorse, subsidize, or enshrine. We’ve waged all-out war against cigarette smoking because it cuts six to seven years off the lives of smokers. We should care no less about those who are destroying themselves through non-normative sexual behavior.



Bottom line: it’s time for conservatives to unhesitatingly reclaim the “D” word, dust it off, and use it without apology. A rational culture that cares about its people will in fact discriminate against adultery, pedophilia, rape, bestiality, and, yes, homosexual behavior.

Fischer and Deace Lament that the GOP is Simply not Anti-Gay Enough

On his radio program yesterday, Steve Deace welcomed Bryan Fischer for a long discussion about Fischer's recent column arguing that "homosexuality is not a conservative value."

Facetiously declaring that "haters of a feather stick together," Deace brought Fischer to try and explain why the Republican Party seemed so intent on embracing the issue of homosexuality at the expense of the support of Christian conservatives.  Fischer warned that if the GOP continued along this path, it was going to spell the end of the Republican Party while Deace simply could not understand why Republicans would be "catering to the homosexual lobby, which is a major fundraising arm for Democrats across the country":

Deace: The GOP is going to have to make a decision here: are they going to stick with those traditions that past conservative stalwarts like Russell Kirk, those laws of natures and nature's God that you just heard Bryan reference, or are they going to embrace the new morality? And what happens Bryan if they make the wrong choice?

Fischer: Well, I think it will be the end of the Republican Party. You know, the evangelical community still provides the core of the Republican Party base, they're the ones who are most motivated to go to the polls and they'll just abandon the Republican Party ...

Deace: You can even simplify it on a more base level which is why would you want to aid and abet and fund the people who are funding the folks you are running against? Why would you want to do that? Why do we aid and abet and enable the homosexual movement? I mean, can you imagine if [Jeff] Sessions and [John] Cornyn said 'we're going to have a fundraiser with AFSCME about how we can raise money to help the Republican Party." There would be howls of protest, Bryan, across the fruited plain from every vestige of the right-of-center coalition in this country. Well, that's the exact same thing they're doing by catering to the homosexual lobby which is a major fundraising arm for Democrats across the country.

Deace and Fischer also claimed that GOP needs to take a stand against homosexuality in particular, because gay activists are systematically forcing society to accept their immoral behavior while refusing to even admit that it is a sin:

Fischer: You know, the reality is Steve, if homosexuals were willing to keep this in the privacy of their own bedrooms, we wouldn't even be having this conversation. They're the ones that are bringing it out of the bedroom, they're bringing it into our streets, they are demanding and insisting that we recognize this behavior, that we normalize it, that we endorse it, that we approve of it. So they're really the ones that are dragging it out of the bedroom and making it an issue in the public square and, you know, we have to respond to that.

Deace: I think what you just said is very important because I get asked this sometimes by Christians, hey I agree that this is a sin, but why is this different than other sins? Why do we make such a big deal out of this publicly? And the point that I make to them is, listen, they're isn't a group of fornicators out there saying we've got to change the laws of marriage, the accreditation laws for counselors, the way in the curriculum that your kids are taught in school in order to teach them, hey, that it's okay for me to be a serial fornicator or a serial adulterer and we're actually going to teach them how to do that better. I mean, we're looking here at an immoral behavior with its own political lobby and they're the ones that are driving this debate, we're simply reacting to it.

Fischer: Well, and you look at this issue of sin; people say 'well, homosexuality is a sin like every other sin' and there's a point to that. But the problem is people right now that are homosexual activists that are engaging in this kind of behavior, they're denying that it is a sin at all. You know, they;'re saying that it is perfectly normal, that it's healthy behavior; they reject the analysis that there is something morally deficient about that behavior whatsoever. You know, most adulterers say "yeah, that wasn't too cool what I did there," but homosexual activists say "no, what we're doing is just fine and not only just fine, we're going to insist that you approve of what we do."

Fischer: Eric Holder Will Never 'Prosecute Someone if the Victim is White'

Over the last few weeks, Bryan Fischer has been growing increasingly vocal about his views that President Obama hates both the Constitution and the United States of America because he thinks it is "one big, giant Ku Klux Klan meeting" and is therefore intentionally trying to destroy the country.

And he made the case again on his radio program yesterday, this time adding in Attorney General Eric Holder, claiming that Holder will never "prosecute someone if the victim is white":

Let's just start with Eric Holder and the Department of Justice - and this goes to his boss Barack Obama - they believe fundamentally that the United States is a racist nation to its core, that it's part of our DNA, that the Constitution is a racist document, that it's a toll of what oppression, that the United States has always been a racist country, it always will be a racist country, it cannot be helped because it's part of our DNA, as long as the United States exists in its current form, it is going to be racist. So Barack Obama and Eric Holder they see that their role, their job, is to punish America for its racism. And I think part of the reason they want to bring America down is, you know, essentially what Barack Obama has said is you can't clean this thing up, you can't correct it, you can't rebuild it, you just have to destroy it. If you're going to get rid of the racism that characterizes America, you are simply going to have to destroy the American political system and start all over because it's in our DNA. There's no what to rehabilitate it, you got to just get rid of it, you got to get rid of the Constitution because it is a racist document.

So in Eric Holder's world, and he's been very straightforward about this, he's never going to prosecute someone if the victim is white, he's just not going to do it. Because in his world, by definition, whites can only be perpetrators. It's impossible, in their worldview, for a white to be a victim, they can only be perpetrators and blacks can never be perpetrators, they can only be victims. So unless the template for the crime is a white person committing a crime against a black person, they're just completely uninterested. They are not interested in justice, they are interested in racism and pressing their view of race.

Fischer Warns GOP that Yielding to 'Whiny' Gays Will 'be the Undoing of the Party'

Following his successful effort to oust openly gay Romney campaign adviser Richard Grenell, American Family Association spokesman Bryan Fischer defended his campaign against him in response to Grenell’s op-ed in the Wall Street Journal. “The claim that gays should be barred from conservative activism is not only bigoted but is a bipartisan view,” Grenell writes. “The intolerant assault comes from the far right, who object to Republicans who are gay, and the far left, who object to gays being Republicans.”

Fischer stood by his harsh criticism of Grenell and in a post today warned the Republican Party that if they accommodate “the tiny two percent of the population who practice unnatural sexual behavior” it will be “the undoing of the party,” saying it will be disastrous for Republicans to continue “cravenly capitulating to a whiny, noisy, hateful and demanding sliver of the American people”:

Perhaps surprisingly, I find myself in agreement with the left on this one. They are dead right when they say you cannot be a homosexual and a conservative.

This is for one simple reason: homosexuality is not a conservative value.

It is a libertarian value, and a liberal value, but it is not a conservative one.

Libertarians and liberals, when it comes to social issues, are in the “anything goes” camp. They reject the whole concept of ordered liberty in which a society is built by people who exercise self-restraint and channel potentially destructive impulses into marriage, family and work.



The bottom line is that the GOP needs to make up its mind. Is it libertarian or conservative on social issues? The increasing accomodation [sic] of ruling class Republicans to the tiny two percent of the population who practice unnatural sexual behavior will be the undoing of the party. Are they truly willing to risk the future of their political party by cravenly capitulating to a whiny, noisy, hateful and demanding sliver of the American people?

If the GOP does not take a firm stand against the normalizing of homosexual behavior, it will squander the political opportunity that has been granted them by the most dangerous and incompetent president in American history.

Word to the GOP: find your moral compass, lads, before it’s too late.

Indeed, Fischer did tell Romney back in April, “You better start listening to me”:

Fischer: Like Jesus, Conservatives Don't Abuse 'Those who Verbally Abuse Us '

As is customary, Bryan Fischer began his radio program yesterday with a discussion of the Bible - in this case the First Epistle of Peter.  The teachings found in these passages prompted Fischer to declare that conservatives, despite having "verbal abused heaped on us all the time," never return that abuse in kind ... just like Jesus:

Remember the example of Christ. He endured terrible, terrible suffering. Completely unjust, He was verbally abused. He did not retaliate. When reviled, he did not revile in return and that's the example that is given for us. That's why conservatives, we have verbal abuse heaped on us all the time, we do not respond in kind, we do not return verbal abuse on those who verbally abuse us and say all kinds of vulgar, profane, blasphemous things to us ... But we don't retaliate in kind. We don't respond with verbal abuse because that's the example of Christ.

AFA Reveals God's Warning to Home Depot

For nearly two years now, the American Family Association has been leading a boycott against Home Depot because the company has "given its financial and corporate support to open displays of homosexual activism on main streets in America's towns."

As part of this campaign, representatives from the AFA attend Home Depot board meetings in order to demand that the company "remain neutral in the culture war" if it wants the AFA to call off the boycott.  So far, the AFA has not had much luck, but representatives continue to attend these meetings, as Randy Sharp, AFA's Director of Special projects, did last week.

Sharp reported that he had an opportunity to speak briefly with Home Depot Chairman Frank Blake  and demand that he agree to meet face-to-face with representatives of the right-wing group for an hour so that the AFA can make its case, but that he received no such commitment.

Sharp went on to reveal that he was not alone in attacking Home Depot for its support for equality at the board meeting, as a Bishop Robert Smith of Little Rock, Arkansas was also present and delivered a message claiming that Home Depot had become "Home Despot"  and warning that if it continued on this path, God would no longer bless the company or its shareholders. 

Both Bryan Fischer and Sharp agreed that this was a prophetic word for Home Depot that "came directly from God": 

UPDATE: The AFA has now posted audio of the remarks delivered by both Sharp and Smith at the board meeting, where Smith stated that God told him that "Home Depot was raised up to be an eagle with wings to bear up Israel in the time of trouble":

The Religious Right and the Rise of Quasi-Birtherism

It is pretty interesting to watch the Religious Right delicately attempt to embrace the anti-Obama Birther conspiracies while desperately trying to avoid being tagged as Birthers. 

Just a few weeks ago, Tony Perkins was saying he was not a Birther while simultaneously claiming that questions about Obama's birth certificate were "legitimate issues."

And now that the Right is all agog about Breitbart.com's latest bombshell dud, the folks over at the American Family Association are likewise trying to figure out how to walk the fine line of promoting the idea without getting stuck with the Birther label , as both Buster Wilson and Bryan Fischer claim not to be Birthers ... while stating categorically that President Obama's long-form birth certificate is a fake:

Fischer: Obama is Turning America into Sodom and Gomorrah

After spending most of a segment talking about how President Obama is a Muslim on his radio program yesterday, Bryan Fischer decided to take some calls from his listening audience.  The first caller Fischer talked to was "Michael from Texas" who asserted that President Obama was "determined to make ours a nation of homosexuals, so I can only say welcome to the United States of Sodom and Gomorrah."

Not surprisingly, Fischer readily agreed and warned that when males entered Sodom and Gomorrah, "they were in danger of being attacked, assaulted, and gang raped." Fischer then said it was especially dangerous when a leader like the President supports homosexuality, which Fischer called "immoral, unnatural, [and] unhealthy" and vowed to oppose "'til I draw my last breath":

The Fischer Defense: 'I am not Anti-Mormon, I am Anti-Mormonism'

Bryan Fischer has a long history of criticizing Mormonism, saying that it is not protected by the First Amendment and warning that electing a "spiritually-compromised candidate" like Mitt Romney will weaken the nation and threatens its spiritual health.

But on his radio program on Friday, Fischer took a moment to make clear that he doesn't hate Mormons ... he just hates Mormonism:

Now I want to say this again, I am not anti-Mormon. I am anti-Mormonism because I think it's error, but I am pro-Mormon. I am for Mormons, I want to see them come to a full understanding of the truth. I bear them no ill will, I bear them no malice, I love them, I want them to come into the full light of the truth.

We should probably point out that this is the exact same defense that Fischer uses to justify his attacks on gays and Muslims:

Obviously Mormons must be greatly relieved to learn that Fischer is not anti-Mormon but merely anti-Mormonism ... just like he is not anti-gay but merely anti-homosexuality and not anti-Muslim but rather anti-Islam. 

Especially since Fischer "loves" gays so much that holds the responsible for the Holocaust, likened them to domestic terrorists and Nazis who are intent on committing “ virtual genocide” against the military, asserts that "homosexuals should be disqualified from public office" and called for the re-criminalization of homosexuality

And he "loves" Muslims so much that he has stated they have no First Amendment rights, that they should be banned from serving in the military as well as from building mosques in the U.S., and that they are inherently stupid as a result of inbreeding.

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Bryan Fischer Posts Archive

Brian Tashman, Thursday 09/19/2013, 4:00pm
While American Family Association spokesman Bryan Fischer is confident that Americans would never elect Hillary Clinton as president because she is simply “too old” and “too saggy,” he now says that if Clinton should win, then she might be the “first lesbian president.” Fischer pointed to an interview between Gennifer Flowers and the UK-based Daily Mail in which she claims that Bill Clinton told her that Hillary is bisexual, and therefore it isn’t out of the question that she may be having an affair with aide Huma Abedin. Since Fischer accepts pure... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 09/18/2013, 12:06pm
As we noted just last week, Bryan Fischer does not bother with things like having evidence or even knowing what he is talking about before going off on an rant on his radio program on some issue that he obviously does not understand. Like Glenn Beck, Fischer too seized on a report that President Obama had waived prohibitions in the Arms Export Control Act so that the US can provide chemical weapons assistance to Syria and used it to raise the possibility of impeachment: Don't miss the significance of this, ladies and gentlemen.  We have a president who is breaking the law. ... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Tuesday 09/17/2013, 5:30pm
We can now add Richard Nixon to the all-encompassing list of people whom Glenn Beck believes to be "progressives." Jim DeMint says President Obama has nothing but disdain for the Constitution. Scott Lively has penned an open "Letter to the British People," calling upon them to turn back to God. It is amazing to watch Bryan Fischer go off about President Obama's effort to send non-lethal aid to Syria despite the fact that he quite obviously understands absolutely nothing about it. Finally, Fischer had Peter LaBarbera on his radio program... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Monday 09/16/2013, 3:44pm
Bryan Fischer began a segment on his radio broadcast today explaining that there are lots of Americans who love gays but are just "grossed out by what homosexuals do" and "want to see them delivered from the bondage and the deception and the darkness and the perverseness of that lifestyle." In fact, Fischer explained, these folks love gays so much that it saddens them to see people "falling prey to that disease; there's a sickness there, there is a pathology associated with homosexual behavior." "You know," Fischer added, "these are not happy... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 09/13/2013, 3:38pm
As he does every day, Bryan Fischer began his radio program with a Bible reading and discussion, in this case, a passage from Psalm 135 which he cited not only as proof that God struck down the Native Americans so that the United States could be established by Christians, but also as proof that there is nothing that human beings can do to influence the climate. Verse 7 of the Psalm declares that "He makes clouds rise from the ends of the earth; he sends lightning with the rain and brings out the wind from his storehouses."  As such, Fischer said, "that's why it is dumb... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 09/13/2013, 11:56am
The last time Bryan Fischer spoke at the Values Voter Summit was back in 2011, when organizers tried to hide his involvement in the conference because of his long history of unabashed bigotry.  The effort failed as the decision to allow him to speak badly backfired when Mitt Romney, who was also speaking at the event, called out Fischer's bigotry from the stage and repudiated it. In 2012, VVS organizers wised up and dropped Fischer from the program altogether, though Fischer insisted at the time that he was not being shunned, but was simply giving up his normal speaking slot to AFA... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 09/12/2013, 4:40pm
Yesterday, radical anti-Islam pastor Terry Jones was arrested while transporting nearly three thousand copies of the Koran that had been soaked in kerosene which he intended to burn in protest of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Jones was charged with illegally carrying a firearm and unlawful conveyance of fuel and the latter charge struck Bryan Fischer as laughable as he defended Jones' right to burn the Koran on his radio program today, saying that using this sort of trumped-up charge to stop him "is really no different than what the Pharisees did to Jesus." "... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Wednesday 09/11/2013, 4:15pm
American Family Association spokesman Bryan Fischer yesterday tied together the closure of an Oregon bakery that refused to serve gay customers who were trying to find a wedding cake and the rapidly-collapsing story of an Air Force officer who insists he was punished by a superior over his views on gay marriage. Fischer said that the two accounts were proof of growing anti-Christian persecution in Obama’s America. Lifting a line from WorldNetDaily, he accused gay rights advocates of using mob-like tactics and shouting “Homo Akbar!” “This is happening everywhere,... MORE >