Brannon Howse

NAR Critic Slams James Dobson and 'Pro-Family Leaders' for 'Giving Credibility to False Teachers'

Earlier today we reported on the appearance of the International House of Prayer’s Lou Engle on James Dobson’s radio show Family Talk, where Dobson, who appeared at Engle’s The Call: San Diego prayer rally to mobilize support Proposition 8, endorsed Engle’s latest prayer rally in Dallas, Texas. But the growing connections between Religious Right leaders and New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) and dominionist figures like Engle have enraged influential conservative Christian commentator Brannon Howse of Worldview Weekend. Last year, Howse strongly denounced Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s The Response prayer rally, and the American Family Association, which co-hosted the event, even forced broadcasters who appeared on the AFA’s radio network to cut ties with Howse.

On his radio show this week, Howse laced into Dobson for consolidating his partnership with Engle, arguing that Dobson’s collaboration with Engle is an example of how “pro-family leaders” are “giving credibility to false teachers.” He also cited evangelist John MacArthur’s criticism of NAR, saying they are “blaspheming the Holy Ghost.”

Howse concludes by warning that Religious Right leaders have no interest in learning more about NAR’s theology, and that their activism “is how you destroy a culture and speed up God’s judgment”:

Howse: You’re going to listen to Lou Engle, Jim Dobson, on what’s biblical? Would you know what was biblical or not biblical coming out of the mouth of Lou Engle? Are you enough of a Verian, Jim Dobson, that you would know whether what he was saying was biblical or not? Because this is the kind of stuff that Lou Engle has said, are you ready?

If we actually have The Call and you don’t sustain prayer ongoing you open a vacuum for demons seven times worse to come in, if black and white can’t move together in prayer and sustain it, forget it let’s not even go there, you get demons seven times worse.

Demons seven times worse? So if we actually have The Call he says and you don’t sustain prayer ongoing you open a vacuum for demons seven times worse? Where is that in the Bible? Where is that in the Bible? So does Dobson agree with his? Does Dobson agree with IHOP? Does Dobson agree with contemplative prayer and the things that are being promoted within the New Apostolic Reformation? Does he agree with blaspheming the Holy Ghost, because that’s what [John] MacArthur says these guys are doing, and I agree with MacArthur, does Dobson even know this? Or is this exactly the kind of example I’ve been trying to paint for the church in America today is you better be very careful who you’re listening to, just because they’re popular doesn’t mean they’re right.

Do you understand when I tell you that some of the biggest pro-family leaders in America I believe have become some of the biggest potential threats to the true Bible-believing church by the fact that they’re giving credibility, I believe, this is my opinion you can agree or disagree, but I believe they are giving credibility to false teachers. John MacArthur, again, says they are blaspheming the Holy Ghost. And you wonder why I get so fired up and why I don’t have any patience and tolerance for this anymore when these people have been warned, when I specifically have warned many of them myself with phone calls to them, when there are search engines and there are organizations that write papers, people who have been a part of IHOP who have left and who have written extensive reports and papers?

But as so many of these guys would tell me ‘oh we’re not a theological group, we have to work with lots of people to reclaim the culture.’ Folks, if embracing false teachers is how you reclaim the culture I don’t want to be a part of it. Secondly, it’s not how you reclaim the culture, I think God’s Word tells us, Romans 1, this is how you destroy a culture and speed up God’s judgment.

AFA Threatens To Fire Any Host Who Partners With NAR Critic

Back when Gov. Rick Perry was organizing his massive "The Response" prayer rally, we were hard at work chronicling the ties between organizers of the event and the self-proclaimed prophets and apostles affiliated with the New Apostolic Reformation.

But it was not just people like us who were taking note of the fact that Republicans and Religious Right leaders were embracing this new breed of spiritual warriors, as some conservatives leaders began to raise alarms of their own.

One of the leading conservative critics of this development has been Brannon Howse of Worldview Weekend, who has been using his radio program to voice his opposition. 

And his criticism is apparently causing such massive headaches for the folks over at the American Family Association that, as Warren Throckmorton reports, hosts of programs that air on the AFA's American Family Radio network are now being told that their shows will be dropped if they in any way partner with Howse:

The American Family Association has taken aim at fellow religious conservative Brannon Howse over his criticism of the AFA’s recent sponsorship of GOP presidential candidate Rick Perry’s The Response prayer meeting. Earlier this week, Jim Stanley, program director of AFA’s radio network, American Family Radio, sent notices to two talk show hosts who are associated with Howse, informing them that continued presence on the AFA’s radio network was conditioned on severing ties with Howse.

The talk show hosts, John Loeffler and Todd Friel, have shows aired by American Family Radio and also speak at Howse sponsored events. According to Tim Wildmon, president of the AFA, “we identified two people with programs on our networks and told them, ’you have to make a choice.’” In defense of the move, Wildmon said “AFR is under no obligation to run programs of individuals who are going to help Brannon when he is attacking our friends. We make programming decisions all the time.”

Howse heads Worldview Weekend, a socially conservative ministry which espouses similar conservative views as the AFA on culture war issues as abortion and homosexuality. However, Howse charges that religious right leaders have formed improper religious alliances with leaders in the New Apostolic Reformation such as Cindy Jacobs in order to promote a conservative political agenda. About his stance, Howse said, “Christians must defend the gospel when we believe Christian leaders are giving credibility to what the Bible describes as false teaching ... In an email, Wildmon told me that Howse had tried to “sabotage The Response that we were sponsors of and has gone after our friends and associates like Jim Garlow, Tony Perkins, James and Shirley Dobson, etc., by name.” He explained that the network had received calls from listeners and that the situation had been “a headache.”

Barton's Show Dropped By Christian Radio Station Over Ties To Glenn Beck

Wow, things do not seem to be going very well for David Barton at the moment.  First he's reduced to filing lawsuits against Texas Board of Education candidates and a blogger and now comes news, via Warren Throckmorton, that Barton's radio show has been dropped due to his on-going defense of Glenn Beck:

The Moody Broadcast Network station in East Texas, KBJS-FM canceled David Barton’s Wallbuilders Live radio program during the show yesterday while Barton was discussing Glenn Beck’s religious beliefs. Randy Featherstone, KBJS manager, said the show was dropped due to Barton’s failure to distinguish between Mormon theology and Christianity.

“When David Barton said it doesn’t matter whether you are a Mormon or a Baptist or a Methodist, we felt we had to do something,” Featherstone explained.

On the Tuesday program, Barton played audio of Glenn Beck saying that “the Lord Jesus Christ is my Savior and my Redeemer.” Then Barton said he believed that Beck was a Christian based on his statement of belief and “his fruits,” meaning his good deeds. Based on Beck’s statements, Barton then asked co-host Rick Green, “Glenn says he’s Mormon. Ok, that’s fine. Based on what you heard, if you heard a Baptist say that or if you heard a Methodist say that…what would you say?” After Green answered that Beck’s testimony indicated a real conversion, Barton responded, “Why is it not a real conversion because of the label he wears?”

Throughout the program, Barton dismissed Beck’s Mormonism, saying at one point, “I don’t care what label Beck wears. I don’t care what Glenn thinks Mormon means.” Barton also asserted that Beck uses the same Bible, but added, “Now he may use the Book of Mormon, we never talked about the Book of Mormon.”

Featherstone added that the station received many calls during the broadcast with callers who objected to Barton’s views. All but two callers supported the decision of the station to drop the show.

Some callers also complained that Barton misuses history and “takes facts out of context” to create a false impression about the Constitution and founding of the nation, according to Featherstone.

Featherstone said the station did not take the action lightly, saying “I like a lot of what Barton has to say, but we don’t want to confuse listeners into thinking that Mormon doctrine and Christianity are the same.”

As Throckmorton notes, Barton dedicated most of yesterday's program to pushing back against criticism from people like Brannon Howse that Barton has been working with Beck to promote the latter's spiritual endeavors despite the fact that Beck is a Mormon. 

Barton has long insisted that even though Beck calls himself a Mormon, he is really a Christian and he even posted a long defense of this on his Facebook page yesterday asserting that regardless of what label Beck wears, he is a Christian in his heart.

But apparently the folks running KBJS aren't buying that defense and decided to stop carrying Barton's daily radio program.

Right Wing Round-Up

  • Alan Colmes:  Mitt Romney Claims He Didn’t Say What He Said.
  • Steve Benen: Pawlenty and the line that cannot be crossed.
  • Eric Kleefeld @ TPM: Prosser Grabs Reporter's Microphone, Quickly Hands It Back.
  • Igor Volsky @ Think Progress: Lesbian Houston Mayor Fights Back Against Anti-Gay Opponent: ‘I’m Being Attacked Simply Because I’m A Lesbian.’
  • Finally, Warren Throckmorton was interveiwed by Brannon Howse yesterday for an informative discussion about David Barton's distortion of history.

Howse: Glenn Beck Is a New Age Pagan Promoting The Anti-Christ

Last year, around the time that Glenn Beck was organizing his "Restoring Honor" rally on the National Mall, concern started bubbling up from the Religious Right fringes about Beck's Mormon faith, especially from people like Brannon Howse, president and founder of Worldview Weekend, who started using his radio program to attack Mormonism as "America's Islam" and warn that Beck was spreading "anti-Biblical beliefs."

Eventually, we stopped paying attention to Howse's attacks, but that didn't mean that Howse stopped leveling them, as he has now released a half-hour video attacking Beck for promoting "universialism, post-modernism, and pagan spirituality" and attacking all of those Religious Right leaders who continue to stand with him:

A Christian author and national speaker has just released a video in which he flays radio and TV commentator Glenn Beck as a pagan, New Age "anti-Christ" who is deluding many believers away from the Bible's teachings and leading them toward Eastern mysticism.

Brannon Howse of Worldview Weekend in Collierville, Tenn., who was once a defender of Beck, is now blasting the popular Fox News host based on content of Beck's new book, "Seven Wonders That Will Change Your Life," co-authored by psychiatrist Dr. Keith Ablow.

"Back in August of 2010, I tried warning folks that Glenn Beck was a pagan, New Age, universalistic Mormon, and indeed, he now has revealed his hand," Howse says in the video, which is based on a column he wrote earlier this year. "Beck's book is nothing less than a promotion of universalism, postmodernism and pagan spirituality, also known as the New Age movement."

He continued: "I hate to say it, but through testing Glenn's doctrinal fruit, he is not a Christian. In fact indeed, he is a false teacher. He is proclaiming another Jesus and another gospel. ... Nowhere in Beck's new book does he mention the biblical Gospel. In fact, what he mentions is anti-Christ. He's denying the exclusivity of Jesus Christ. What Glenn is promoting is the same lie promoted by Satan in Genesis 3, verses 1–5. And I'm fearful that the spiritual poison Beck is promoting is not seven wonders that will change your life, but in fact lies that will condemn the souls of millions for eternity."

Anti-Islam Activists Have Equally Negative Views of Mormonism

Last week I noted now Brannon Howse, who had been leading a crusade against Glenn Beck because of his Mormon faith, had started explicitly comparing Mormonism with Islam:

Both belief systems teach that they have the only true and complete religion on face of the earth. Both reject Christianity as corrupted. Both taught the plurality of wives, both on earth and in here-after. Both teach that the Bible is corrupt and mistranslated. Both revealed God’s true scripture. Both reject original sin and the doctrine of the trinity. Both teach a salvation by good works. Both use a lay clergy. Both founded by a holy uneducated prophet. Both founding prophets had angelic visitations that they were to restore Adamic religion. Both prophets' words were above scripture or earlier prophets. Both teach a theocratic form of government.

I guess it should not come as much of a surprise to learn that many of the Religious Right activists who are most vocal in attack Islam also have a long history of attacking Mormons as well.

Case in point is Bill Keller:

To an audience of about 50 people -- fully half of whom were members of the press -- Pastor Bill Keller launched his 9-11 Christian Center at ground zero this morning with a fiery sermon targeting Muslims and Mormons as hell-bound followers of false faiths. Keller took aim in particular at Glenn Beck, a Mormon, and Imam Rauf, the organizer of the Park51 Islamic community center.

Keller first made a name for himself a few years back by attacking Mitt Romney, claiming that vote for Romney was a vote for Satan.

Keller's anti-Mormon attacks against Romney were echoed by Robert Jeffress, pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas, who proclaimed that "Mormonism is a cult" and that Christians could not vote for Romney because "Christians are uniquely favored by God, [while] Mormons, Hindus and Muslims worship a false god."

So it is entirely predictable that Jeffress likewise hates Islam:

Prominent Pastor Robert Jeffress of the First Baptist Church of Dallas gave a sermon a few weeks ago saying, among other things: "The deep, dark, dirty secret of Islam: It is a religion that promotes pedophilia - sex with children. This so-called prophet Muhammad raped a 9-year-old girl - had sex with her."

...

First Baptist's Sunday evening service on August 22 featured an "Ask the Pastor" segment, in which Jeffress called Islam "oppressive" and violent." He also said that "around the world today, you have Muslim men having sex with 4-year-old girls, taking them as their brides, because they believe the prophet Muhammad did it."

"I believe," Jeffress added, "as Christians and conservatives, it's time to take off the gloves and stand up and tell the truth about this evil, evil religion."

...

"It does incite violence. It is used to oppress women around the world," he added, continuing that he "was not talking about this country" when referencing pedophilia. But, Jeffress said, "the worst thing about Islam is that it is a deception that leads people from the true God."

Jeffress contended that "we do not hate Muslims" and noted: "I have a very good friend here in Dallas who is a Muslim."

Something for Glenn Beck to keep in mind as he gins up anti-Muslim sentiment and opposition to Park 51:  people who hate Islam generally have equally harsh views about all other faith traditions as well, including Mormonism.

Mormonism: America's Islam

Last week we noted on Glenn Beck's Mormon faith was becoming a real scandal for some conservative Christian activists, with Brannon Howse of WorldView Weekend leading the charge against Religious Right leaders who have been linking arms with him.

Howse has been on a crusade about this for a week now and now it has come full circle as he dedicated his program yesterday to exposing how Mormonism is just like Islam:

"Mormonism, America's Islam" is a book written in 1912. What do Mormons and Muslims have in common? Similarities of Muhammad and Joseph Smith: - Visited by an angel. - Given visions. - Told that no true religion existed on the earth. - Was sent to restore the long lost faith as the one true religion. - A book produced from their teachings claimed to be “inspired by God.” - Each claimed to be illiterate or uneducated and used this as proof the book was inspired. - Each claimed the Bible was lost, altered, corrupted and unreliable. - Each claimed his new holy book was the most correct and perfect book on earth. - Each claimed to be a final prophet of God. - Each claimed he was persecuted because of his pure faith. - Was a polygamist who had many wives. - Immediately after his death a fight broke out from among the “faithful converts” as to who would succeed him. - Both religions have those who follow the “original doctrine” of the founding leaders and like these founding leaders, have been violent, polygamists, and have revelations justifying their evil actions. - Each has progressive revelation. (“New” revelation always replaces older revelation that became inconvenient to the prophet.) This list was compiled by Erick Barger. Here is the list compiled Ed Decker after his study of the two religions: Both belief systems teach that they have the only true and complete religion on face of the earth. Both reject Christianity as corrupted. Both taught the plurality of wives, both on earth and in here-after. Both teach that the Bible is corrupt and mistranslated. Both revealed God’s true scripture. Both reject original sin and the doctrine of the trinity. Both teach a salvation by good works. Both use a lay clergy. Both founded by a holy uneducated prophet. Both founding prophets had angelic visitations that they were to restore Adamic religion. Both prophets' words were above scripture or earlier prophets. Both teach a theocratic form of government. Both teach a here-after with graded rewards for works. Both claim to be the world’s fastest growing religion. Glenn Beck, a Mormon was able to get Christians to lock arms with Muslims in a spiritual endeavor that was looking to "one god".

September 11, 1857, Mormons slaughter 120 men, women and children in the name of God and then years later the Mormons worked to build a Mormon memorial on the ground of the Mountain Meadow Massacre against the wishes of family members of the slain. On September 11, 2001, Islamic terrorists murdered American citizens in the name of God and now seek to build a memorial to their religion in the form of a Mosque only a stone throw from where the Twin Towers once stood.

Biblically committed Christians must understand the spiritual deception of these last days and how Satan will move among false religions and cults to deceive Christians as well as non-Christians as he seeks to build his one-world religion. Satan is seeking to destroy Biblical Christianity for a humanistic Christianity. Satan wants to embarrass and compromise Christian pastors and leaders. Satan is seeking to infiltrate Bible based churches with false teaching and turn them toward his goal of pluralism in the name of tolerance and a social gospel. Satan will use that which has a form of godliness but denies the God of the Bible. Do not be shocked when most "Christians" do not see this and ridicule you.

That's right: Glenn Beck is now coming under attack for being part of a violent religious cult that is being used by Satan to destroy Christianity. 

I am choking on the irony.

Faith 2 Action Issues Its Own "Beck is a Mormon" Warning

Ever since Janet Porter lost her Faith 2 Action radio program earlier this summer, her organization has all but ceased to function, which is what made the sudden appearance of a new piece on the F2A website noteworthy in itself ... but it turned out to be even more interesting because F2A seems have to sprung back to life specifically in order to warn Christians not to get too cozy with Glenn Beck:

Beck can say and write many good things, but that doesn't mean that we should embrace his spiritual position or accept him and other Mormons as Christians.

At a quick glance, some of the Articles of Faith of "the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints" can seem very similar to true Christianity. However, Mormons attach very different meanings to certain words that Christians commonly use, such as atonement. Glenn Beck made a reference to atonement in his commencement address at Liberty University in May. According to Mormonism, only Christ's blood shed in the Garden of Gethsemane atones for personal sin. Mormonism also teaches that through the atonement of Christ and by their good deeds and "holy" living, men can one day become gods, and with their multiplicity of "goddess wives," populate their own planets.

Deception takes many forms. Unless we exercise caution, even "the elect" can be deceived (Matthew 24:24; Mark 13:22). The apostle Paul tells us in 1 Thessalonians 5:21 to "Test all things. Hold fast what is good."

We can get many good things out of Glenn Beck's books as well as his radio and TV programs. But, Beck and all those associated with Mormonism need our prayers that they will someday see the error and reject it.

This is very similar to the arguments made earlier this week by Brannon Howse who, you may recall, also severed ties with Porter earlier this year due to her embrace of "whacked out folks." So it seems that while Howse and Porter don't agree on the dangers of dominion-oriented prophets and apostles, they do agree that Mormonism is a dangerous cult.

Glenn Beck's Religious Activism Comes Full Circle

Yesterday I wrote a post about how some Religious Right activists have been growing alarmed by Glenn Beck's subtle transformation from Tea Party leader to religious leader because Beck is a Mormon, citing a recent radio program by Brannon Howse, president and founder of Worldview Weekend, which focused on how Beck has started merging Mormon doctrine with his lessons on American history.

As Julie Ingersoll explained, Howse brought Ed Decker, a former Mormon, on to his program last week to explain the significance behind the theories Beck was promoting on his August 18 show about the history of Native Americans:

[O]n his show on Wednesday, Beck discussed an obscure archeological find, the Bat Creek Stone, that Beck believes has been hidden from the public by the Smithsonian Institution and others because it is evidence of ties between ancient Israel and Native Americans -- which, although Beck did not say this explicitly, would also be evidence for claims (albeit recently disputed within the LDS Church) made in the Book of Mormon. Howse, on his radio show, said he was “stunned” to hear Beck “laying down Mormon teaching” and “when [Beck] started talking about the Bat Creek Stone. . . . I didn’t stay with it, it was just too weird.” (While Howse presented no evidence that Mormons have used the Bat Creek Stone to promote such a view, Beck's use of it was characteristically wacky, as the theory he promoted has long been discredited by archeologists) ... Howse’s guest was Ed Decker, a former Mormon whose apologetics ministry, Saints Alive, focuses on demonstrating the ways in which Mormonism departs from orthodox Christianity. And together they spent nearly an hour denouncing Beck and skewering Mormonism. They even read and ridiculed comments from people on Beck’s website, who indicated that they were Mormon. Decker said Beck has been “using terminology that Mormons manipulate. . . terms that have double meanings . . . and that now he’s getting into things right out of the Book of Mormonism itself.”

Normally, when Beck goes off trying to expose these sorts of conspiracies, most of us are inclined to simply tune him out.  But in this case, that would be a mistake because if you know anything about the importance of Native Americans in Mormon theology, it is blatantly obvious that Beck is now subtly incorporating his religious beliefs into his grand theory of America history:

As Richard and Joan Ostling explain in their book "Mormon America: The Power and the Promise," this unique belief about Native America history is central to the Mormon faith:

The Book of Mormon tells of two ancient seaborne migrations from the Holy Land to the Americas, by Hebrew peoples who are assumed to be ancestors of Native Americans. The older migration, by the Jaredites, occurred after the Tower of Babel incident around 2200 BC, and the later one around 600 BC, just before the Babylonian captivity of the Israelites. In the second, more detailed narrative, Lehi, a descendant of the biblical patriarch Joseph, builds a ship. Guided by a compass, he sails by way of the Indian and Pacific Oceans to the Americans, landing possibly in Central America. Two of Lehi's sons become wicked and rebellious, so God curses them with dark skin. Many American Indians, traditionally called "Lamanites, are supposed to have descended from them. Nephites are the descendants of Lehi's faithful sons.

Ostling made the same point in the PBS documentary "The Mormons":

RICHARD OSTLING: Mormonism teaches that ancient Israelites came to the New World and created scriptures, which we have today as the Book of Mormon, thus Israelites are ancestors of Native Americans. There's a whole story, a very elaborate story of great cities being built. But non-Mormons - and I guess we'd say Mormon skeptics - who have studied these matters do not see evidence. They don't see the DNA that would support the Israelite theory. They don't see evidence of Hebrew language in the New World. They don't see the archeological sites that would show these grand cities that are described.

MICHAEL COE, Archaeologist: According to a lot of Mormon archeologists, their job is to find that this is a true story, that all these things actually existed in this place that is described in the Book of Mormon, which in this case, would have to be in Guatemala and the neighboring Mexican state of Chiapas. And this is what they've been after for 50 years. They've excavated all kinds of sites, and unfortunately, they've never found anything that would back it up.

Clearly, this theory is the foundational premise upon which the Book of Mormon is based and, as Decker explained to Howse, Beck's discussion of the Bat Creek Stone and the "real" history of Native Americans is designed to bolster the idea that "the Jews came to America before Columbus [because] this is the basis of the Book of Mormon ... he's saying that the Smithsonian and many of the scientific agencies of America have lied to the America people and hidden facts from them that prove that the Jews were here before Columbus":

For years now, Beck has been a hero to the Religious Right, but you have to wonder how much longer that will last now that Beck no longer views himself simply as a conservative leader, but as a religous leader and is even using his program to promote Mormon doctrine as American history. 

Update: In the interest of fairness, I want to call attention to this Joanna Brooks piece in which she argues that the role of Native Americans it not, in fact, a "foundational premise" of the Book of Mormon:

If anything, Mormon leaders have been slowly but steadily deemphasizing Native Americans over the last three decades, abandoning the grand discourse once used in the 1970s by Church leaders like Spencer Kimball to describe even contemporary Native peoples as Book of Mormon “Lamanites” with a special history and destiny. That deemphasis has led to mixed feelings and even lasting hurt among some Native peoples, as the recent death of once-prominent Navajo Mormon George P. Lee, who had served as a high-ranking Church leader but was later excommunicated, reminds us.

Ask a 21st-century Mormon what the foundational premise of the Book of Mormon is, and he or she will tell you that they believe the book is scripture because they read it and prayed about it and find reason for hope and deeper faith in its pages. As it is for most contemporary people of faith, personal spiritual experience is the foundational premise of contemporary Mormonism.

My point wasn't that the history of the Native Americas is "foundational" to the beliefs of 21st-century Mormons, but that it was "foundational" to Joseph Smith's own understanding of the Book of Mormon; as Richard Lyman Bushman wrote in "Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling": 

The efforts to situate the Book of Mormon in history, whether ancient or modern, run up against baffling complexities. The Book of Mormon resists conventional analysis, whether sympathetic or critical. Early Mormons themselves had trouble grasping the book's nature. When required to offer a brief summary, they often called it a history of the Indians. Samuel Smith, Joseph's brother, on a tour to win followers in 1830, tried to sell the book as a "history of the origins of the Indians." Joseph himself wrote a newspaper editor in 1833 that "the Book of Mormon is a record of the forefathers of our western Tribes of Indians."

Beck's Mormon Faith Raising Alarms Among The Religious Right

Recently, Glenn Beck seems to have started undergoing a transformation from a Tea Party leader to a Religious Right leader as he increasingly sells his brand of right-wing conspiracy-theorizing in religious terms.

What started with his partnership with David Barton as rapidly expanded to include all sorts of Religious Right activists and now Beck has started claiming that his upcoming "Restoring Honor" rally is literally being orchestrated by God and that "the Spirit of the Lord is going to be unleashed like you've never felt it before" and miracles will take place at the event.

Beck's move to establish himself as a religious leader among conservatives is being met with alarm from some evangelical activists due to the fact that Beck is Mormon, forcing people like Barton to defend his associations with Beck by claiming that Beck shouldn't be judged by the label he wears but by the fruits that he produces. 

But it doesn't look like activists are buying that excuse, as Brannon Howse, president and founder of Worldview Weekend, dedicated his program on Friday to raising alarms about this new development:

Please remember Brannon started the website keepglennbeck.com to support Glenn when the radicals wanted his advertisers to stop advertising in his program. With that said, Brannon believes Glenn has now moved into an area where we must draw a clear line theologically and doctrinally. While Christians can join Glenn in opposing tyranny, socialism, cultural Marxism, and the like but we cannot join him spiritually. Glenn's website describes the event at the Kennedy Center as "Glenn Beck's Divine Destiny" and states that the event will include "uplifting music, nationally-known religious figures from all faith will unite…" Glenn's website also promotes Glenn's "Daily Spiritual Thought" and "join Glenn Beck live each weekday morning at 7:05a ET for prayer." Why must we respectfully and lovingly tell Glenn we cannot agree with him nor find common ground in the area of Biblical doctrine and theology?

Is Glenn now using his TV program to push his Mormon faith? Glenn has the right to push his Mormon faith on TV but Glenn needs to be upfront about it ... The point of today's program is that Christians need to be wise and not fall into the trap of compromising on the Gospel of Jesus Christ in an effort to be politically correct, tolerant and find religious unity with anti-Biblical beliefs and religions. We appreciate the strong and courageous stands that Glenn has taken but Christians understand that Glenn is now, by his own choice, promoting something that is not compatible with Biblical Christian doctrines. We can be co-belligerents on many moral issues with non-Christians but we cannot find common ground theologically and doctrinally. Christians must understand that the Jesus of the cults is not the Jesus of the Bible.

You may recall that, a few months back, Howse severed ties with Janet Porter due to her associations with the "kind of whacked out folks" who preach Dominionism. 

Similarly, Howse's Worldview Weekend has had a long relationship with David Barton, so it'll be interesting to see how Howse handles Barton's increasing involvement with, and defense of, Beck's Mormon faith.

Janet Porter Dropped From Worldview Radio Because Of Her Ties To "Whacked Out Folks"

I've written several posts already about the fact that Janet Porter had her radio program dropped by VCY America following her May Day 2010 prayer rally due to the Dominionist underpinnings of the event. 

That move has all but closed down Porter's Faith 2 Action organization and so Porter has spent a lot of her energy lately attacking Discernment Ministries as being responsible for getting her fired. 

But, as it turns out, it was not just VCY that dropped Porter's radio program - Worldview Weekend also terminated its relationship with her over her May Day prayer rally.

On May 5, Brannon Howse, who has been a long-time support of Porter's and even regularly hosted her F2A radio program in her absence, announced that Worldview Radio had parted ways with her and would no longer be carrying her program:

We, on our radio network, our on-line radio network at WorldviewWeekend.com last Thursday pulled a program, Faith 2 Action which was the radio program, or is the radio program, of Janet Folger. I''ve sat in for Janet a few times when should we be unable to host her show and I've been a guest on her show many times - in fact we had her speak at our Worldview Weekend several years ago the criminalization of Christianity, a very good book she wrote on that topic.

But in the last few months, I've become concerned as, and in particular the last week weeks, I've become concerned as I think we are parting company in the important area of theology and doctrine. So we had to pull the program.

A lot of this came to light after the May Day event that took place in Washington DC

...

Those were some of the groups, I believe, that were represented at the May Day event - some folks who believe in Dominion theory, Kingdom theology and those who believe in extra-Biblical revelations. So, for that reason, I could not take part and the more I saw on the internet with some of the folks, the more I felt we needed to separate ourselves from that, particularly because it was confusing the public.

So we alerted the staff at F2A that we were not going to carry their broadcast any longer on our on-line radio network. And that's just the stance we've chosen to take. I believe it's great to call a nation to true Biblical repentance but I'm afraid that some, for lack of a better word, some really kind of whacked out folks, crept into the May Day event, and I did hear some stories after the event of some things that really concerned some folks who were there themselves with the Dominion theory theology people.

You can listen to Howse's extended explanation of the decision here, but the gist of it is that Worldview was not comfortable with Porter's embrace of those we believe in extra-Biblical revelation - people like Cindy Jacobs and Dutch Sheets and Lou Engle who consider themselves Prophets and Apostles that receive powers and visions from God.  Howse also explained that while he does not necessarily oppose Dominion Theology or those who advocate it, he does not personally support it or believe in it.  For those reasons, Howse and Worldview Weekend not only declined to endorse Porter's May Day rally but decided that cut ties with her completely.

I wonder why Porter isn't attacking Howse and Worldview Weekend as a bunch of "cultural Nazis" who are siding with the ACLU and throwing rocks from the sidelines of the culture war at those, like Porter, who are trying to save America from its descent into communism.

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Brannon Howse Posts Archive

Brian Tashman, Friday 03/16/2012, 4:45pm
Earlier today we reported on the appearance of the International House of Prayer’s Lou Engle on James Dobson’s radio show Family Talk, where Dobson, who appeared at Engle’s The Call: San Diego prayer rally to mobilize support Proposition 8, endorsed Engle’s latest prayer rally in Dallas, Texas. But the growing connections between Religious Right leaders and New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) and dominionist figures like Engle have enraged influential conservative Christian commentator Brannon Howse of Worldview Weekend. Last year, Howse strongly denounced Texas Gov. Rick... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 09/30/2011, 4:00pm
Back when Gov. Rick Perry was organizing his massive "The Response" prayer rally, we were hard at work chronicling the ties between organizers of the event and the self-proclaimed prophets and apostles affiliated with the New Apostolic Reformation. But it was not just people like us who were taking note of the fact that Republicans and Religious Right leaders were embracing this new breed of spiritual warriors, as some conservatives leaders began to raise alarms of their own. One of the leading conservative critics of this development has been Brannon Howse of Worldview Weekend, who... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 09/14/2011, 10:39am
Wow, things do not seem to be going very well for David Barton at the moment.  First he's reduced to filing lawsuits against Texas Board of Education candidates and a blogger and now comes news, via Warren Throckmorton, that Barton's radio show has been dropped due to his on-going defense of Glenn Beck: The Moody Broadcast Network station in East Texas, KBJS-FM canceled David Barton’s Wallbuilders Live radio program during the show yesterday while Barton was discussing Glenn Beck’s religious beliefs. Randy Featherstone, KBJS manager, said the show was dropped due to Barton... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 07/01/2011, 3:19pm
Alan Colmes:  Mitt Romney Claims He Didn’t Say What He Said. Steve Benen: Pawlenty and the line that cannot be crossed. Eric Kleefeld @ TPM: Prosser Grabs Reporter's Microphone, Quickly Hands It Back. Igor Volsky @ Think Progress: Lesbian Houston Mayor Fights Back Against Anti-Gay Opponent: ‘I’m Being Attacked Simply Because I’m A Lesbian.’ Finally, Warren Throckmorton was interveiwed by Brannon Howse yesterday for an informative discussion about David Barton's distortion of history. MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Thursday 03/10/2011, 11:32am
Last year, around the time that Glenn Beck was organizing his "Restoring Honor" rally on the National Mall, concern started bubbling up from the Religious Right fringes about Beck's Mormon faith, especially from people like Brannon Howse, president and founder of Worldview Weekend, who started using his radio program to attack Mormonism as "America's Islam" and warn that Beck was spreading "anti-Biblical beliefs." Eventually, we stopped paying attention to Howse's attacks, but that didn't mean that Howse stopped leveling them, as he has now released a half-hour... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Tuesday 09/07/2010, 5:01pm
Last week I noted now Brannon Howse, who had been leading a crusade against Glenn Beck because of his Mormon faith, had started explicitly comparing Mormonism with Islam: Both belief systems teach that they have the only true and complete religion on face of the earth. Both reject Christianity as corrupted. Both taught the plurality of wives, both on earth and in here-after. Both teach that the Bible is corrupt and mistranslated. Both revealed God’s true scripture. Both reject original sin and the doctrine of the trinity. Both teach a salvation by good works. Both use a lay clergy... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 09/03/2010, 12:05pm
Last week we noted on Glenn Beck's Mormon faith was becoming a real scandal for some conservative Christian activists, with Brannon Howse of WorldView Weekend leading the charge against Religious Right leaders who have been linking arms with him. Howse has been on a crusade about this for a week now and now it has come full circle as he dedicated his program yesterday to exposing how Mormonism is just like Islam: "Mormonism, America's Islam" is a book written in 1912. What do Mormons and Muslims have in common? Similarities of Muhammad and Joseph Smith: - Visited by an angel. -... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Friday 08/27/2010, 4:49pm
Ever since Janet Porter lost her Faith 2 Action radio program earlier this summer, her organization has all but ceased to function, which is what made the sudden appearance of a new piece on the F2A website noteworthy in itself ... but it turned out to be even more interesting because F2A seems have to sprung back to life specifically in order to warn Christians not to get too cozy with Glenn Beck: Beck can say and write many good things, but that doesn't mean that we should embrace his spiritual position or accept him and other Mormons as Christians. At a quick glance, some of the Articles... MORE >