Foundation for Moral Law

The Ten Commandments And The 4,300-Year-Old Dinosaur: Michael Peroutka's Web Of Christian-Nation Influence

Two weeks ago, the Creation Museum — the anti-evolution themepark run by the advocacy group Answers in Genesis — received a huge gift: a $1 million dinosaur skeleton meant to help the museum illustrate its belief that dinosaurs were part of the original creation 6,000 years ago and coexisted with humans until well after Noah’s flood.

The benefactor that gave the museum Ebenezer the Allosaurus was the Elizabeth Streb Peroutka Foundation, a family foundation run by Maryland-based right-wing activists and brothers Michael and Stephen Peroutka and Michael’s daughter Elizabeth. Observers immediately noted that this dinosaur came with some contemporary human baggage: Michael Peroutka is an extreme right-wing activist who is a frequent supporter and former board member of the neo-Confederate League of the South and who believes that the Union’s victory in the Civil War brought on all of America’s ills, including “homo-sodomite unmarriage.”

But the Peroutkas’ influence extends far beyond fringe anti-gay, neo-Confederate activism and providing a real-life dinosaur to illustrate made-up science. Through a set of debt-collection businesses, the Peroutkas finance a host of anti-choice groups and promote a troubling Christian-Nation ideology in Maryland and throughout the country. Michael Peroutka, a 2004 Constitution Party candidate for president, is also largely self-financing his campaign for local office in Anne Arundel County.

Michael Peroutka runs the Institute on the Constitution, an “educational” group through which he promotes his Christian Reconstructionist viewpoint that “the function of civil government is to obey God and to enforce God’s law” — that is, Peroutka’s idea of what constitutes God’s law. Peroutka, for instance, claims that there are no such thing as “civil rights” enforceable by the government, because “rights come from God.”

The Institute on the Constitution, according to the group’s website, is “sponsored” by and shares an address with Peroutka and Peroutka, the debt-collection firm Michael runs with his brother Stephen, who was also a  co-founder of the Institute.

It’s through the law firm and its debt-buying arm, Pasadena Recievables, that the Peroutka brothers finance the Elizabeth Streb Peroutka Foundation, which is named after their mother.

From its founding in 2003 through 2012, the last year for which tax records are available, the family’s foundation has been almost entirely financed by grants from the Peroutkas' pair of debt-collection businesses, along with investment income and a few personal donations from Michael and Stephen. Together, the family and its businesses have put $5.2 million into the foundation over nine years.

Its biggest asset, until now, has been the Allosaurus.

Ebenezer the Allosaurus was originally dug up in 2002 by a team of homeschoolers led by a conservative Christian family from Florida that ran a business providing anti-evolution excavation adventures. Also leading that expedition was Doug Phillips, a leader of the anti-feminist Quiverfull movement, who is now facing charges of sexual battery and assault against a young follower.

From the moment the bones were found, their discoverers vowed to keep them out of the hands of scientists, who estimate that the Allosaurus lived roughly 150 million years ago. “I am sure the evolutionists would love to get their hands on these bones," Phillips said at the time. “Who can blame them. It is like a gold mine for paleontologists.”

Peroutka cited those fears at the Creation Museum unveiling last month, when he told of how he came to purchase Ebenezer. He was determined to keep the dinosaur out of the hands of “anyone with a ‘millions of years’ mindset,” he said, and to keep it under the guardianship of those who believe the skeleton is just 4,300 years old:

While snatching the dinosaur from the evolutionists has been the Peroutka family foundation’s priciest project, Michael explained in his remarks at the museum that the foundation was “primarily intended to offer financial aid to groups who were dedicated to ending the holocaust of abortion.”

Of $3.6 million in grants that the Peroutka Foundation has dispensed over nine years, about one-quarter — $920,000 — has gone to the National Pro-Life Action Center, an anti-choice lobbying group chaired by Stephen Peroutka. (The Center is one of a tangled web of right-wing organizations run out of the same office in Washington). Stephen Peroutka was also the founder of National Pro-Life Radio, a network run out of the same building as the brothers’ law office that aired shows from anti-choice activists including Janet Porter, Jay Sekulow, Frank Pavone, Jesse Lee Peterson, and both Peroutka brothers.

The foundation has heaped much of its largesse on Maryland-based abortion clinic protest groups and crisis pregnancy centers, including contributing a total of $236,000 to the Baltimore-based abortion clinic protest group Defend Life, perhaps most infamous for organizing a protest outside the middle school attended by the daughter of an abortion provider’s landlord.

And although anti-choice groups have received the bulk of the foundation’s grants, it has also taken on some other causes close to Michael Peroutka’s heart.

Most notably, the foundation has contributed tens of thousands of dollars to groups associated with Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, one of the nation’s loudest proponents of Christian Reconstructionist ideology, who shot to fame in 2003 when he was ousted from his original position on the state supreme court for refusing to remove a statue of the Ten Commandments from his courthouse.

In 2004, after the far-right Constitution Party failed to recruit Moore to run for president, Peroutka took his place as the party’s candidate. That same year, the Peroutka Foundation spent $120,000 bankrolling Moore’s nationwide speaking tour “regarding morality and the Ten Commandments” and gave $12,000 to the National Coalition to Restore the Constitution, a group that organized rallies backing Moore in an effort drum up support for a measure preventing federal courts from hearing many church-state separation cases .

In addition, the Peroutka Foundation has contributed a quarter of a million dollars to the Foundation for Moral Law, the group that Moore ran before returning to the Alabama Supreme Court, and which is now run by Moore’s wife. Under Moore’s leadership, the Foundation for Moral Law hosted a neo-Confederate “secession day” event, and the group employs John Eidsmoe, a Michelle Bachmann mentor who has white supremacist ties. One of Moore's activities at the group was representing protesters who had disrupted a Hindu opening prayer in the U.S. Senate. “It's a shame that not one U.S. Senator stood up to defend a tradition that goes back to the very first Continental Congress of acknowledging the one true God of the Holy Scriptures," he lamented.

In 2007 and 2008, the Peroutka Foundation contributed $60,000 to Moore’s now-defunct Coalition to Restore America. In the summer of 2007, Moore spoke at a conference in Maryland organized by Peroutka, where, according to Americans United for Separation of Church and State, “he and a string of far-right activists peddled ‘Christian nation’ rhetoric, bashed Islam, belittled American culture and the federal government and displayed an alarming affinity for the neo-Confederate states’ rights cause.” Also speaking at the conference were Eidsmoe and Gordon Klingenschmitt, the former Navy chaplain who now supplies the world with an endless supply of YouTube rants about gay “demonic spirits.” At the end of the day, everyone gathered under a Confederate flag to dedicate part of the Peroutkas’ land as “Judge Roy Moore Field.”

In 2011, the Institute on the Constitution presented Moore with an award for “choosing to obey God, and acknowledging Him both in word and in deed, regardless of the consequences” and resisting “a government which thought it was God.”

The next year, when Moore successfully ran to reclaim his seat on the state supreme court, Peroutka provided the bulk of his campaign chest.

The affinity between Moore and Peroutka extends to the issue of evolution. Moore contends that the theory of evolution is incompatible with the Constitution; Peroutka insists the “promotion of evolution is an act of disloyalty to America”:

While anti-choice groups and Moore have been the biggest recipients of the Peroutka Foundation’s generosity — at least until Ebenezer moved into the Creation Museum — the foundation has also offered smaller grants to a smattering of extremist ministries and Confederate history enthusiasts.

The Foundation has given $24,000 over six years to Pass the Salt, the ministry of unhinged anti-gay extremist “Coach” Dave Daubenmire (the one who complained last year that he was "sick and tired of being sodomized by the left"). In 2012, it gave a $6,000 grant to “You Can Run By You Cannot Hide,” the ministry of Bachmann acolyte Bradlee Dean, who travels to unsuspecting public schools to give disturbing anti-gay “seminars.”

Since 2006, the foundation has given an annual $1,000 grant to restoring a Confederate cemetery in Maryland, a project organized by the Sons of Confederate Veterans, a group that has cozied up to the racist extremists in its ranks. In 2004, it donated $2,250 to a Confederate reenactment troop for "education of the public as to the causes of the War between the States."

The Peroutkas are also frequent donors to state and local campaigns. According to Center for Responsive Politics data, Michael, Stephen and Stephen’s wife Deborah  contributed $35,900 to their congressman, Rep. Andy Harris, between 2007 and 2011.

Not the least of the beneficiaries is Michael Peroutka himself, who has lent $30,000 to his own campaign for Anne Arundel County Council, about half of the $62,000 he has raised so far. His political ambitions may continue to run higher — it was rumored that he considered running for state attorney general this year before setting his sights on the county council.

Peroutka’s web of influence shows that he is more than, as one libertarian scholar put it, a "wackypants anti-gay crusader.” Peroutka's activism and  philanthropy illuminate the connections between the Creationist movement, the Christian-Nation philosophy of people like Judge Moore, anti-choice agitators, fringe anti-gay extremists like Daubenmire and Klingenschmitt, and the network of Confederate nostalgists that can never quite hide its racist roots. All are striving for a biblical and constitutional purism that exists only in the minds of those who adhere to it, and a return to an imagined past where dinosaurs stowed away on Noah’s ark, the Constitution mandated an exclusively Christian nation, and the Civil War didn't turn out quite right.

Research contributed by Ian Silverstone

Roy Moore: Under Marriage Equality, US Will 'No Longer Have A Constitution'

Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who last week announced his support for a convention of states to amend the US Constitution to ban same-sex marriage, has launched a new campaign to promote the anti-gay amendment, called “I Stand With Judge Moore.”

Moore, who believes that marriage equality is a Satanic influence that will lead to “oppressive” government and divine punishment, told WorldNetDaily yesterday that the legalization of same-sex marriage threatens the Constitution:

“It’s a travesty,” Judge Roy Moore told WND on Monday about the move toward judiciary-imposed same-sex “marriages.” “The courts are exercising wrongful authority over this country.”

He said it was no less than the U.S. Supreme Court itself which, in an earlier ruling, said, “We come nearest to illegitimacy when we deal with judge-made constitutional law with no cognizable roots in the design of the Constitution.”



“If marriage falls,” he said, “the institution of family upon which it is based falls.”

Then, he said, “We no longer have a Constitution. We have a government of individual men who have the power to decide what the Constitution means … .”

The Religious Right group Moore founded, the Foundation for Moral Law, has posted the letter and resolution, “The Marriage Preservation Amendment to the United States Constitution,” [PDF] that Moore sent to the nation’s governors pleading with them to initiate a convention of states.

In addition, Moore dedicated a speech to the Alabama Cattleman’s Association last week to denouncing same-sex marriage:

Roy Moore Warns that the Government is Determined to 'Destroy this Country'

Roy Moore, the former Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who was removed from office for failing to follow a court order to move his replica of the Ten Commandments, is now in a four-person race for Chief Justice following his two failed gubernatorial bids and an aborted run for president. Yesterday on City on a Hill Radio, Moore said it seems that the government has become “the enemy of the people” because of its promotion of “tolerance and diversity,” which he described as dangerous concepts. He went on to say that the legalization of same-sex marriage is proof that “our government is doing a lot that is to destroy this country and it is against the people”:

Moore: When you said ‘the government can become the enemy of the people,’ I don’t know that the government is not already the enemy of the people. When it denies the faith upon which the Constitution and our country was founded, when it is de-educating our children with some of these schools teaching them tolerance and diversity, just think of those concepts: should we praise diversity? We’re one nation under God, that’s not diverse, that includes all people, black, white, yellow, red, it includes all people, people are one under God, and that’s what it’s supposed to be, you should love your neighbor as yourself despite if you know he is different than you are that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t love him. Diversity is celebrating a division among people.

Tolerance, is tolerance a good concept? We’re not to tolerate sin. There is nothing in the Bible, nothing in our culture that says we are to tolerate sin, in fact, you’re supposed to oppose sin, you’re supposed to hate sin. But does that mean you hate people? No. You love people, but you hate the sin, and that’s always been the truth. But we’ve got these concepts sneaking into our school and the government is mandating the teaching of them.

They are approving same-sex marriage, fortunately not the United States government yet but they are trying to get that established across our country, that you could marry somebody of the same sex. Our government is doing a lot that is to destroy this country and it is against the people. Unless we wake up and speak out...we’re going to lose our country.

Moore Abandons Presidential Bid, Announces Campaign To Return To Supreme Court

After his presidential campaign never gained traction, former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore announced that he will seek his old job that he lost after he was removed for snubbing a court order to move his Ten Commandment monuments out of the courthouse rotunda. Moore ran for governor in 2006 and 2010, both times failing to secure the Republican nomination. He then set out to campaign for president by touring Iowa, telling The Iowa Republican, “I legitimately feel like I can win this race.” When not campaigning for office, Moore used his Foundation for Moral Law to push an extremist agenda, including personhood laws and the removal of three Iowa justices who backed marriage equality, calling gay rights a “moral meltdown.”

The Montgomery Advertiser reports that Moore will try to seek his old post. Ironically, his campaign adviser described Moore as a judge who “will rule on law and uphold the state and federal constitutions”:

Roy Moore, standing in front of the State Judicial Building where he last stood eight years ago as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court before being removed from office, announced Tuesday that he is running for another term as chief justice.

Moore was removed from office in 2003 for refusing to follow a federal judge's order to move a more than two-ton monument that included the Ten Commandments from the State Judicial Building. "There is no question I know this job, and I believe the people of Alabama know exactly what I stand for," Moore said.



When asked how he thought people might perceive him running for chief justice after he was removed from that same position, Moore said, "I hope they realize what I was removed for was wrong."

"I have always acknowledged God and will continue to do so," he said. Moore finished fourth in the 2010 Republican primary for governor.

Moore has served for the last eight years as president of the Foundation for Moral Law, which has its headquarters in downtown Montgomery. He said the foundation has written hundreds of briefs for cases pending in state and federal courts regarding issues such as religious rights and the right to bear arms.



In a Tuesday email, Zachery Michael, who said he worked for Moore's 2010 gubernatorial campaign and his presidential exploratory committee from 2009 to 2011 as a strategist and adviser, said he was endorsing Malone because "it is time to elect a judge that will rule on law and uphold the state and federal constitutions."

"Controversy and fame is not in Judge Malone's heart, however: service, justice, and a strong devotion to law is his passion," Michael wrote.

Alabama Weighs Extreme "Personhood" Laws

As neighboring Mississippi is set to vote on a “personhood” amendment in November, Alabama may have its own personhood debate as a “personhood” amendment and statute have been introduced in the state legislature. Republican legislators in the Alabama legislature have introduced “personhood” laws as both statutes and amendments to the state constitution. Both chambers are controlled by Republicans, and the Senate statutory bill already has the support of a majority of state senators.

Personhood laws grant constitutional rights to zygotes and fetuses, and ban abortion without exception, certain forms of birth control, in vitro fertilization, and the treatment of pregnancy complications such as ectopic pregnancies. The radical anti-choice group Personhood USA along with the Foundation for Moral Law, led by former Alabama state Supreme Court justice and likely presidential candidate Roy Moore, are the main forces behind the state’s personhood legislation. Ben DuPré, the point person for the state’s personhood campaign, is a graduate of Pat Robertson’s Regent University and Regent University School of Law and a former clerk for Robertson’s American Center for Law and Justice and Moore, and is now an attorney for the Foundation for Moral Law and the head of Personhood Alabama. DuPré likened legal abortion to the dehumanization of black people in America:

The Foundation for Moral Law and Personhood Alabama have announced personhood bills and amendments in the House and the Senate, backed by a large number of supporters.

SB301 is a clear recognition of the personhood rights of all human beings, regardless of their age, size, or location. SB 301 states “The term ‘persons’ as used in the Code of Alabama 1975, shall include any human being from the moment of fertilization or the functional equivalent thereof.”

SB 301 is a statutory change to the Alabama Code, and is sponsored by a staggering 19 of 35 Alabama Senators.



Yesterday HB 405 and HB 409 were filed in the House by Representative John Merrill,a Personhood Statute and Personhood Amendment, respectively. The Personhood Statute and Amendment were backed by 31 co-sponsors.

“It is my belief that this bill will clearly affirm that, under law, an individual becomes a person upon fertilization,” stated Representative Merrill.



DuPré added, “America used to define the meaning of ‘person’ along racial lines; now we draw the line at the womb. Personhood legislation finally gives equal protection of the laws to the unborn as well as the born, and from the first moment of human life.”

God Will Destroy America for Gay Marriage in Iowa Like He Destroyed Rome

The Family Leader, the anti-gay Iowa group led by Bob Vander Plaats, held a rally in Des Moines earlier this week to demand a referendum to overturn the 2009 State Supreme Court decision which established marriage equality. Roy Moore of the Foundation for Moral Law said that marriage equality was bringing about a “moral meltdown,” and another speaker claimed that supporters of gay-rights “hijacked” the civil rights movement and declared that “deviant behavior is not the same as being denied your right to vote.”

Cary Gordon of Cornerstone World Outreach launched a long diatribe against equal rights for gays and lesbians, and his church was a major player in the campaign against retaining three of the justices who backed marriage equality. One of his church members even publicized a video saying that equal marriage rights would lead to legalizing incest.

14:00 into his speech, Gordon maintains that unless Iowans “protect the virtue of true Americanism from our own mental barbarians who attack our minds with the God-hating secularism of Europe,” like the Roman Empire “we too will be extinguished from the earth.”

Alabama Lawmaker Wants Ten Commandments Displays To Stop People "From Going Berserk or Killing Folks"

A Republican State Senator wants to amend the state constitution to allow the Ten Commandments to be placed in public schools and buildings in the same state where ex-Judge Roy Moore had his monumental and ultimately unsuccessful fight over his display of the Ten Commandments, which was found to be unconstitutional. In fact, Moore’s new group, The Foundation for Moral Law, is supporting the proposal because a spokesman says that opponents would have a “hard time saying the Ten Commandments are distinctly religious.”

Alabama State Sen. Gerald Dial is seeking the amendment in order to stop people “from going berserk or killing folks,” which presumably occurs due to the absence of the Ten Commandments from public institutions. According to Dial, “Whether you’re Baptist or Christian or Muslim or anything else the Ten Commandments are rules we ought to live by” and “if we did we’d have a much better world.”

During his campaign for the State Senate, Dial claimed that “liberal Democrats are attempting to hoodwink the voters,” and said he would “make sure the government stays out of our lives and doesn’t tell us how to raise our families” and stand up for “pro-family, pro-gun, pro-America, Christian values.”

The Anniston Star reports:

And on the first day of the 2011 legislative session, Sen. Gerald Dial, R-Lineville, introduced a bill to amend the state constitution to allow the Ten Commandments to be displayed in public schools and buildings.

“I’d like to see the Ten Commandments posted in public buildings and school rooms,” Dial said. “If it keeps one person from going berserk or killing folks then it’s worth the effort.”

This marks the seventh time Dial has introduced the bill and 10 years since his first attempt. But the “whole climate” in Montgomery changed with the last election, Dial said. This time the bill, which is currently in committee, will pass, he says.

“On a scale of one to 10, I’m about a 12 more confident,” Dial said in a phone interview while he drove back from Montgomery. He noted that he was both driving the speed limit and talking on Bluetooth during the interview.

If the bill does pass this time, Dial can expect its constitutionality to be challenged in court.



But this bill might not be as clear-cut violation of the federal constitution as Lynn and Neal make it out to be, said John Eidsmoe, a member of the Foundation for Moral Law’s legal team. A number of different religions accept the Ten Commandments, he said.

Beyond that, Eidsmoe said, courts have cited it in opinions and laws are based on its guidelines.

“I think you’d have a hard time saying the Ten Commandments are distinctly religious,” Eidsmoe said. “They’re an expression of the basic precepts that just about every society has been built upon.”

Dial grew up with the Ten Commandments freely displayed and discussed in school, he said. He saw them then as he does now: as a constant reminder, a flickering caution light as to how one should act.

Today Dial has a framed copy of the commandments waiting to go up in his Montgomery office. He’s been busy with the start of the legislative session and hasn’t had a chance to put it up. He will soon though, Dial said. And if the bill passes, he and the bill’s other five sponsors will provide free laminated copies of the commandments to schools wishing to display them.

“Whether you’re Baptist or Christian or Muslim or anything else the Ten Commandments are rules we ought to live by,” Dial said. “If we did we’d have a much better world.”

Even WND is Debunking the Right's "Original Jurisdiction" Nonsense

Yesterday I noted that Bryan Fischer and others had stumbled upon a novel justification for why they didn't have to recognize court decisions they didn't like by claiming that the Supreme Court has "original jurisdiction" in "all cases...in which a State shall be Party." 

As such, any ruling involving a state that was not decided by the Supreme Court first "has no legal weight" and does not carry "the slightest constitutional authority."

As I pointed out, that means that any rulings in Virginia's lawsuit against health-care reform are likewise illegitimate, as are all the rulings in countless other cases making their way through the federal court system.

But you don't have to take my word for it, as even WorldNetDaily recognizes this simple fact

[C]onstitutional expert Herb Titus, who is affiliated with the William J. Olson law firm, said the full text of the constitutional provision needs to be noted, because it does not provide the Supreme Court with "exclusive" original jurisdiction.

He noted the constitutional text:

"In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make."

It is that provision that allows Congress to make exceptions and regulations that provides the authority for Bolton's court to hear the case, he noted.

"Could you imagine every case that involves a state as a party being before the Supreme Court. The court would be so loaded with those kinds of cases …" he said.

Another top constitutional expert, John Eidsmoe, of the Foundation for Moral Law, agreed.

"Congress can make exceptions out of that area," he told WND. "What the courts have said in areas where the court has original jurisdiction, Congress by its power to create exceptions, can add [responsibility or authority]."

You know that your arguments are doomed when even WorldNetDaily agrees that they are utter nonsense.

Roy Moore Acolyte Too Racist for WI Tea Party

Yesterday, we noted how Harry Jackson was begging Tea Party activists to get a little more media savvy and work hard to salvage the movement's reputation in order to counter the growing impression that the movement is racist.

Would this count as a success or a failure, in that regard?

An Alabama attorney who has spoken to white supremacists who believe slavery is ordained by God withdrew Thursday from a planned appearance at a Wausau tea party rally next week after organizers questioned his views.

John Eidsmoe of Pike Road, Ala., was scheduled to speak at the April 15 event alongside Jefferson County Circuit Judge Randy Koschnick and others.

But Koschnick complained to the rally's organizer after being presented with information about Eidsmoe's background by The Associated Press. Wausau tea party organizer Meg Ellefson said Koschnick's concerns were legitimate and after she called Eidsmoe on Thursday, he offered to withdraw from the rally.

...

Eidsmoe has spoken before the League of the South, tagged by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group because it believes slavery was ordained by God. He's also spoken at meetings of the Council of Conservative Citizens, which opposes racial integration; has compared Michael Jackson to an ape, referred to blacks as "a retrograde species of humanity," and says America should "remain European in character," according to the SPLC.

"Eidsmoe doesn't just flirt with white supremacists, he regularly speaks to them," said SPLC research director Heidi Beirich.

I guess organizers deserve credit for dropping Eidsmoe from the event after they learned of his views ... which is more than can be said of, say, Roy Moore:

Eidsmoe, a colonel in an Alabama militia, is a former law school professor and one-time legal adviser to Roy Moore, the Alabama chief justice ejected from his post for defying federal court orders to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the Supreme Court rotunda. Eidsmoe works at the Foundation for Moral Law in Alabama, where Moore serves as president.

Two Right-Wingers Mulling Governor Bids

According to news reports, both Club for Growth President Pat Toomey and disgraced “Ten Commandments Judge” Roy Moore are signaling that they might run for Governor of their respective states of Pennsylvania and Alabama.

From the Morning Call:

Former Lehigh Valley Congressman Pat Toomey has begun formally exploring a run for governor, setting up a meeting with area GOP donors as he assesses his potential candidacy in 2010.

Toomey, president of the anti-tax group The Club for Growth, is scheduled to sit down with several influential and deep-pocketed Lehigh Valley Republicans in early February to “discuss his thinking of a possible gubernatorial run,” according to an e-mail invitation sent out Friday on behalf of Arcadia Properties founder Richard Thulin.

He has also put calls out statewide to supporters this week with the aim of raising $50,000 to do some preliminary polling, said a GOP source who was briefed on his plans this week.

Toomey, in a statement released today, said he has had “several preliminary conversations with supporters of mine regarding a possible run for governor in 2010.”

“Given the state of Pennsylvania’s economy and the disastrous state budget deficits we face, there certainly is a need for major changes in Harrisburg,” Toomey said. “It is still very early in my exploration of a possible run but it is something I will consider.”

From the AP:

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore says he is seriously considering making another race for governor in 2010.

Moore has been running a legal organization, the Foundation for Moral Law, since losing the Republican primary to incumbent Gov. Bob Riley in 2006. But in recent weeks, a growing number of supporters has been calling and visiting Moore, encouraging him to run again.

Moore says that if he runs, it will be as a Republican. He expects to make a decision in the spring.

Who's Who At the Values Voter Debate

Below are short biographies of those who have been mentioned as participating in tonight's "Values Voter Presidential Debate" in Fort Lauderdale, Florida:
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Foundation for Moral Law Posts Archive

Miranda Blue, Tuesday 06/10/2014, 4:00pm
Two weeks ago, the Creation Museum — the anti-evolution themepark run by the advocacy group Answers in Genesis — received a huge gift: a $1 million dinosaur skeleton meant to help the museum illustrate its belief that dinosaurs were part of the original creation 6,000 years ago and coexisted with humans until well after Noah’s flood. The benefactor that gave the museum Ebenezer the Allosaurus was the Elizabeth Streb Peroutka Foundation, a family foundation run by Maryland-based right-wing activists and brothers Michael and Stephen Peroutka and Michael’s daughter... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Tuesday 02/11/2014, 11:35am
Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who last week announced his support for a convention of states to amend the US Constitution to ban same-sex marriage, has launched a new campaign to promote the anti-gay amendment, called “I Stand With Judge Moore.” Moore, who believes that marriage equality is a Satanic influence that will lead to “oppressive” government and divine punishment, told WorldNetDaily yesterday that the legalization of same-sex marriage threatens the Constitution: “It’s a travesty,” Judge Roy Moore told WND on Monday... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 02/02/2012, 6:35pm
Roy Moore, the former Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who was removed from office for failing to follow a court order to move his replica of the Ten Commandments, is now in a four-person race for Chief Justice following his two failed gubernatorial bids and an aborted run for president. Yesterday on City on a Hill Radio, Moore said it seems that the government has become “the enemy of the people” because of its promotion of “tolerance and diversity,” which he described as dangerous concepts. He went on to say that the legalization of same-sex marriage is... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Wednesday 11/23/2011, 1:15pm
After his presidential campaign never gained traction, former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore announced that he will seek his old job that he lost after he was removed for snubbing a court order to move his Ten Commandment monuments out of the courthouse rotunda. Moore ran for governor in 2006 and 2010, both times failing to secure the Republican nomination. He then set out to campaign for president by touring Iowa, telling The Iowa Republican, “I legitimately feel like I can win this race.” When not campaigning for office, Moore used his Foundation for Moral Law to... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Friday 04/01/2011, 1:08pm
As neighboring Mississippi is set to vote on a “personhood” amendment in November, Alabama may have its own personhood debate as a “personhood” amendment and statute have been introduced in the state legislature. Republican legislators in the Alabama legislature have introduced “personhood” laws as both statutes and amendments to the state constitution. Both chambers are controlled by Republicans, and the Senate statutory bill already has the support of a majority of state senators. Personhood laws grant constitutional rights to zygotes and fetuses, and... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 03/17/2011, 2:01pm
The Family Leader, the anti-gay Iowa group led by Bob Vander Plaats, held a rally in Des Moines earlier this week to demand a referendum to overturn the 2009 State Supreme Court decision which established marriage equality. Roy Moore of the Foundation for Moral Law said that marriage equality was bringing about a “moral meltdown,” and another speaker claimed that supporters of gay-rights “hijacked” the civil rights movement and declared that “deviant behavior is not the same as being denied your right to vote.” Cary Gordon of Cornerstone World Outreach... MORE >
Brian Tashman, Thursday 03/03/2011, 3:23pm
A Republican State Senator wants to amend the state constitution to allow the Ten Commandments to be placed in public schools and buildings in the same state where ex-Judge Roy Moore had his monumental and ultimately unsuccessful fight over his display of the Ten Commandments, which was found to be unconstitutional. In fact, Moore’s new group, The Foundation for Moral Law, is supporting the proposal because a spokesman says that opponents would have a “hard time saying the Ten Commandments are distinctly religious.” Alabama State Sen. Gerald Dial is seeking the amendment in... MORE >
Kyle Mantyla, Wednesday 08/04/2010, 10:14am
Yesterday I noted that Bryan Fischer and others had stumbled upon a novel justification for why they didn't have to recognize court decisions they didn't like by claiming that the Supreme Court has "original jurisdiction" in "all cases...in which a State shall be Party."  As such, any ruling involving a state that was not decided by the Supreme Court first "has no legal weight" and does not carry "the slightest constitutional authority." As I pointed out, that means that any rulings in Virginia's lawsuit against health-care reform... MORE >