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Right Wing Round-Up

Right Wing Round-Up

Right Wing Leftovers

Personal Meeting Leaves Rob Schenck Very Impressed With Tim Pawlenty

In the early 1990s, Rob Schenck was a radical anti-abortion activist who worked alongside his twin brother Paul carrying out protests against Dr. Barnett Slepian in upstate New York ... until Slepian was murdered by another anti-abortion activist.

Instrumental in the founding of Operation Rescue with Randall Terry, Schenck was arrested in 1992 for thrusting a container containing a fetus at then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton and stopped by the Secret Service a few years later after aggressively confronting President Clinton as he headed to church.

Since then, Schenck has toned down his radical anti-choice activities and become an influential minister to members of Congress and created a network of overlapping right-wing organizations through which he carries out his work, 

In recent years, he has become best known for regularly annointing doorways and hearing rooms with oil before big events like Supreme Court hearings and presidential inaugurations and questioning the Christian faith of President Obama ... and, I guess, meeting with Tim Pawlenty:

I had the privilege of spending an evening with Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty during one of his visits to Washington. I found him genuine, a mature Christian and a very pleasant personality.

Personal Meeting Leaves Rob Schenck Very Impressed With Tim Pawlenty

In the early 1990s, Rob Schenck was a radical anti-abortion activist who worked alongside his twin brother Paul carrying out protests against Dr. Barnett Slepian in upstate New York ... until Slepian was murdered by another anti-abortion activist.

Instrumental in the founding of Operation Rescue with Randall Terry, Schenck was arrested in 1992 for thrusting a container containing a fetus at then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton and stopped by the Secret Service a few years later after aggressively confronting President Clinton as he headed to church.

Since then, Schenck has toned down his radical anti-choice activities and become an influential minister to members of Congress and created a network of overlapping right-wing organizations through which he carries out his work, 

In recent years, he has become best known for regularly annointing doorways and hearing rooms with oil before big events like Supreme Court hearings and presidential inaugurations and questioning the Christian faith of President Obama ... and, I guess, meeting with Tim Pawlenty:

I had the privilege of spending an evening with Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty during one of his visits to Washington. I found him genuine, a mature Christian and a very pleasant personality.

Bozell: Kids Are “Targets” of “Gay Propaganda” on TV

Brent Bozell of the Media Research Center talks a lot about “balance,” consistently railing against the media for not giving sufficient time to conservative viewpoints. While the MRC wants “balance” in the media, apparently it could not tolerate “balance” at CPAC as the group decided to boycott the conference over the participation of the gay-inclusive organization GOProud. Now, Bozell is upset the media isn't more critical of gay teen characters on television, particularly Glee. He laments the success and portrayal of Glee actor Chris Colfer and the introduction of a transgender character on the show Degrassi, blaming “gay propaganda” for “intimidating dissidents” and blasting GLAAD for “pushing to take the pro-gay message to grade-schoolers.” Bozell writes:

Their most controversial scene was the two private-school boys singing "Baby, It's Cold Outside" to each other on the Fox show. "That was the gayest thing that has ever been on TV, period, " Colfer boasted. The magazine touted this was the hottest-selling track on the "Glee" Christmas album, which gives you a flavor of Hollywood's reverence for that holy day.

As you might suspect, Entertainment Weekly didn't plan to debate gay teen propaganda, but to encourage it, energetically. Not a single soul had anything critical to say. Not even a question. If this magazine weren't so earnestly in the tank, the story could come with a disclaimer: "This issue is an advertisement bought and paid for by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation."

Writer Jennifer Armstrong summed it up like this: "The good news: Young gay characters are on a momentous roll after years of stops and starts." EW championed under the inside headline how "networks are making up for years of on-air silence and providing inspiration for real-life youth (and parents) still searching for answers." Armstrong says gay characters are "not just an accepted, but expected part of teen-centric television." (Emphasis hers.)

They are not celebrating diversity. They are intimidating dissidents.

In their Gay Teen Timeline, we hear the gay actors proclaiming the lack of opposition. "We never received a negative word," says the gay actor on ABC's 1994 bomb "My So-Called Life." The gay teen on ABC's "Ugly Betty" insisted, "99 percent of the public response was positive." Translation: Get in line.



But there is always a new trail to blaze. TeenNick's grope opera "Degrassi" has had eight gay characters and is now normalizing "Adam," a female-to-male transgender teen. Co-creator Linda Schuyler proclaimed, "People are realizing that the lines of sexuality are not just drawn between gay guys and lesbian girls, but there is a sliding scale of sexuality, and that's something new."

No one should be surprised that Armstrong and her GLAAD allies are also pushing to take the pro-gay message to grade-schoolers. Armstrong complained gay characters are "entirely absent from mainstream sitcoms and tween networks like Disney Channel and Nickelodeon." Disney Channel issued the magazine a vague statement about their "responsibility to present age-appropriate programming for millions of kids age 6-14 around the world."

"Age-appropriate" is not a term these activists recognize. Parents should understand that their young children are the next propaganda targets.

Bozell: Kids Are “Targets” of “Gay Propaganda” on TV

Brent Bozell of the Media Research Center talks a lot about “balance,” consistently railing against the media for not giving sufficient time to conservative viewpoints. While the MRC wants “balance” in the media, apparently it could not tolerate “balance” at CPAC as the group decided to boycott the conference over the participation of the gay-inclusive organization GOProud. Now, Bozell is upset the media isn't more critical of gay teen characters on television, particularly Glee. He laments the success and portrayal of Glee actor Chris Colfer and the introduction of a transgender character on the show Degrassi, blaming “gay propaganda” for “intimidating dissidents” and blasting GLAAD for “pushing to take the pro-gay message to grade-schoolers.” Bozell writes:

Their most controversial scene was the two private-school boys singing "Baby, It's Cold Outside" to each other on the Fox show. "That was the gayest thing that has ever been on TV, period, " Colfer boasted. The magazine touted this was the hottest-selling track on the "Glee" Christmas album, which gives you a flavor of Hollywood's reverence for that holy day.

As you might suspect, Entertainment Weekly didn't plan to debate gay teen propaganda, but to encourage it, energetically. Not a single soul had anything critical to say. Not even a question. If this magazine weren't so earnestly in the tank, the story could come with a disclaimer: "This issue is an advertisement bought and paid for by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation."

Writer Jennifer Armstrong summed it up like this: "The good news: Young gay characters are on a momentous roll after years of stops and starts." EW championed under the inside headline how "networks are making up for years of on-air silence and providing inspiration for real-life youth (and parents) still searching for answers." Armstrong says gay characters are "not just an accepted, but expected part of teen-centric television." (Emphasis hers.)

They are not celebrating diversity. They are intimidating dissidents.

In their Gay Teen Timeline, we hear the gay actors proclaiming the lack of opposition. "We never received a negative word," says the gay actor on ABC's 1994 bomb "My So-Called Life." The gay teen on ABC's "Ugly Betty" insisted, "99 percent of the public response was positive." Translation: Get in line.



But there is always a new trail to blaze. TeenNick's grope opera "Degrassi" has had eight gay characters and is now normalizing "Adam," a female-to-male transgender teen. Co-creator Linda Schuyler proclaimed, "People are realizing that the lines of sexuality are not just drawn between gay guys and lesbian girls, but there is a sliding scale of sexuality, and that's something new."

No one should be surprised that Armstrong and her GLAAD allies are also pushing to take the pro-gay message to grade-schoolers. Armstrong complained gay characters are "entirely absent from mainstream sitcoms and tween networks like Disney Channel and Nickelodeon." Disney Channel issued the magazine a vague statement about their "responsibility to present age-appropriate programming for millions of kids age 6-14 around the world."

"Age-appropriate" is not a term these activists recognize. Parents should understand that their young children are the next propaganda targets.

Rand Paul: "My Goal Is To Make DeMint Look Like a Moderate"

During the last election, it seemed that just about every Republican running for office was eager to wrap themselves in the mantle of the Tea Party ... but now that the election is over, it doesn't seem that members of Congress are particularly eager to keep on carrying it:

Although dozens of Republicans sailed into office with the help of the tea-party movement last year, finding a self-identified "Tea Party Republican" on Capitol Hill is harder than you'd think.

The first meeting of the Senate Tea Party Caucus on Thursday attracted just four senators - out of a possible 47 GOP members - willing to describe themselves as members. The event was as notable for who wasn't there than who was.

• Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., once a tea-party darling, has for now declined to join the caucus, whose first meeting was organized by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.

• Sen. Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican whose campaign sprang from the small-government movement, has passed for now.

• Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., showed up to address the group of activists Thursday, but then hustled out of the room, ignoring reporters' questions about whether he was in or out.

But those who did show up at the meeting seem eager to demonstrate the bona fides as Tea Party activists pressed Sen. Jim DeMint to cut at least $1.4 trillion in spending per year while Rand Paul burnished his reputation for being one of he most extreme members of the Senate:

[Sen. Rand] Paul's approach - bold, specific and unwaveringly conservative - is exactly what the most engaged activists of the tea party have been seeking. One of the biggest applause lines at Thursday's meeting came when staunch conservative Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., quoted Paul as saying, "My goal is to make DeMint look like a moderate."

Rand Paul: "My Goal Is To Make DeMint Look Like a Moderate"

During the last election, it seemed that just about every Republican running for office was eager to wrap themselves in the mantle of the Tea Party ... but now that the election is over, it doesn't seem that members of Congress are particularly eager to keep on carrying it:

Although dozens of Republicans sailed into office with the help of the tea-party movement last year, finding a self-identified "Tea Party Republican" on Capitol Hill is harder than you'd think.

The first meeting of the Senate Tea Party Caucus on Thursday attracted just four senators - out of a possible 47 GOP members - willing to describe themselves as members. The event was as notable for who wasn't there than who was.

• Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., once a tea-party darling, has for now declined to join the caucus, whose first meeting was organized by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.

• Sen. Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican whose campaign sprang from the small-government movement, has passed for now.

• Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., showed up to address the group of activists Thursday, but then hustled out of the room, ignoring reporters' questions about whether he was in or out.

But those who did show up at the meeting seem eager to demonstrate the bona fides as Tea Party activists pressed Sen. Jim DeMint to cut at least $1.4 trillion in spending per year while Rand Paul burnished his reputation for being one of he most extreme members of the Senate:

[Sen. Rand] Paul's approach - bold, specific and unwaveringly conservative - is exactly what the most engaged activists of the tea party have been seeking. One of the biggest applause lines at Thursday's meeting came when staunch conservative Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., quoted Paul as saying, "My goal is to make DeMint look like a moderate."

Santorum Hires Founder of Corporate Astroturf Group that Ran Ads Attacking the “Victory Mosque”

In another sign that Rick Santorum is gearing up for a presidential bid, the former Pennsylvania Senator hired two top Republican strategists from Iowa. CNN reports that Nick Ryan and Jill Latham “will serve as advisers to his political action committee, America's Foundation.” Ryan and Latham both originally worked at the Concordia Group, a lobbyist firm that primarily worked to help the ethanol industry. Ryan is also a founder of the American Future Fund (AFF), a shadowy political group that was accused of violating campaign finance law.

The New York Times found the AFF targeted Democrats that were involved in setting federal agriculture policy, a key concern of Ryan’s Concordia Groups clients. The AFF’s political director also worked in the Concordia Group, and the AFF paid Ryan’s firm $300,000 for consulting fees.

But the AFF’s ads were not focused on agriculture, and instead chastised Democrats for their votes for health care reform, clean energy legislation, or for Nancy Pelosi to be Speaker of the House.

In one of the most shameless ads of the election, the AFF attacked Rep. Bruce Braley (D-IA) for saying that New York’s zoning officials should decide the fate of the planned Park51 Islamic community center as part of its smear against the First Amendment rights of Muslims.

Watch: