All

2012 Candidates Weekly Update 2/08/11

Michele Bachmann

Health Care: Calls reform law the “crown jewel of socialism,” plots its repeal every day (Iowa Independent, 2/7).

South Carolina: Plans to address Republican groups in South Carolina (Spartanburg Herald Journal, 2/3).

House: Tense relationship between Bachmann and Speaker Boehner (US News & World Report, 2/3).

Haley Barbour

Health Care: Joins with other GOP governors to protest reform law (Reuters, 2/7).

Fundraising: Tight knit group of corporate donors finance Barbour’s PAC (Politico, 2/6).

Mike Huckabee

Foreign Affairs: Wants to redraw Mideast borders according to the Bible (WaPo, 2/7).

Iowa: Advisers from 2008 Iowa campaign not in close contact with Huckabee (Des Moines Register, 2/6).

Sarah Palin

Religious Right: CPAC-boycotters question Palin’s comments about GOProud (The Hill, 2/7).

Media: Application to trademark her name rejected (TIME, 2/7).

Fundraising: Cancels Colorado fundraiser due to “onslaught of attacks,” but ticket sales were also lagging (Denver Post, 2/5).

Ron Paul

2012: Campaign for Liberty adviser believes Paul is "seriously considering" another presidential bid (Fox News, 2/7).

Religious Right: Set to address The Family Leader lecture series (Politico, 2/7).

Tim Pawlently

DADT: Defends position in favor of reinstating Don’t Ask Don’t Tell (Think Progress, 2/7).

Religious Right: Brandishes is evangelical faith at far-right The Family Leader forum (AP, 2/7).

Mitt Romney

Experience: Stresses his corporate background, downplaying role as Massachusetts’s governor (Forbes, 2/7).

2012: Gathers leading supporters to discuss nomination bid (Boston Globe, 2/4).

Fundraising: Uses five different state PACs to help raise $6.3 million (The Daily Beast, 6/4).

Rick Santorum

Campaign: Outlines contrasts between himself and leading GOP contenders to show path to victory (The Daily Beast, 2/5).

Religious Right: George Will emphasizes Santorum’s success campaigning on social issues (Union Leader, 2/3).

South Carolina: Told Tea Party group that he would eliminate the 9th circuit court (TPM, 2/3).

Right Wing Round-Up

  • TPM: So What’s Ginni Thomas Up To Now?
  • Alan Colmes: Michele Bachmann: I Take My First Breath In The Morning Thinking “Repeal Obamacare.”
  • Alvin McEwen: Bradlee Dean and Paul Cameron - When Disgustingly Vile Homophobes Meet.
  • AlterNet: Montanta Legislator Introduces Bill to Create Armed Paramilitary Groups.

Right Wing Round-Up

  • TPM: So What’s Ginni Thomas Up To Now?
  • Alan Colmes: Michele Bachmann: I Take My First Breath In The Morning Thinking “Repeal Obamacare.”
  • Alvin McEwen: Bradlee Dean and Paul Cameron - When Disgustingly Vile Homophobes Meet.
  • AlterNet: Montanta Legislator Introduces Bill to Create Armed Paramilitary Groups.

Right Wing Leftovers

  • Ron Paul to tour Iowa with Bob Vander Plaats’s anti-gay group.
  • Even William Kristol is troubled by Beck’s Egypt comments, and Beck hits back.

Fischer Takes on CPAC, Palin, and Parenting

Today on his radio show Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association, who has already criticized CPAC over their inclusion of the gay conservatives group GOProud, is now upset with Sarah Palin. In an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network, Palin seemed to dismiss the complaints of boycotters, like Fischer, that GOProud should be excluded from the conference. Palin recently turned down the opportunity to give the keynote address at CPAC, which despite the outcry among the Religious Right will feature speakers like Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, and Phyllis Schlafly.

Fischer blasts conservatives who support “the normalization of homosexuality,” and says that “the homosexual lifestyle itself is extremely dangerous to human health and simple compassion dictates that we should discourage people from that kind of behavior just as we frown on smoking.” While he believes that “the homosexual agenda” threatens “the freedom of association,” he goes on to attack CPAC for associating with groups like GOProud and Palin for defending the decision. He praises Palin for her unpopularity among the left (and actually, most Americans), but adds that “if Sarah Palin continues to send such uncertain signals, [liberals] may start leaving her alone.”

He later takes a caller who wants to discuss a boy who sometimes wears skirts and jewelry, and Fischer discusses his own expertise in parenting, saying he would tell his children, “My responsibility in life is not to give you a happy childhood,” sternly adding, “By the way, if this question should come up in the future, you are having a happy childhood.”

Fischer Takes on CPAC, Palin, and Parenting

Today on his radio show Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association, who has already criticized CPAC over their inclusion of the gay conservatives group GOProud, is now upset with Sarah Palin. In an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network, Palin seemed to dismiss the complaints of boycotters, like Fischer, that GOProud should be excluded from the conference. Palin recently turned down the opportunity to give the keynote address at CPAC, which despite the outcry among the Religious Right will feature speakers like Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, and Phyllis Schlafly.

Fischer blasts conservatives who support “the normalization of homosexuality,” and says that “the homosexual lifestyle itself is extremely dangerous to human health and simple compassion dictates that we should discourage people from that kind of behavior just as we frown on smoking.” While he believes that “the homosexual agenda” threatens “the freedom of association,” he goes on to attack CPAC for associating with groups like GOProud and Palin for defending the decision. He praises Palin for her unpopularity among the left (and actually, most Americans), but adds that “if Sarah Palin continues to send such uncertain signals, [liberals] may start leaving her alone.”

He later takes a caller who wants to discuss a boy who sometimes wears skirts and jewelry, and Fischer discusses his own expertise in parenting, saying he would tell his children, “My responsibility in life is not to give you a happy childhood,” sternly adding, “By the way, if this question should come up in the future, you are having a happy childhood.”

Hartzler: GOP Already Cut $2.7 Trillion From Deficit, No Need to Cut Defense

Elected to Congress last November, Missouri Republican Vicky Hartzler campaigned as both a Religious Right activist and as a Tea Party adherent. But while she literally wrote the book on how and why ultraconservative Christians should run for office, she has had trouble staying true to her anti-government Tea Party rhetoric— she has received hundreds of thousands of dollars of government farm subsidies and, during her campaign, couldn’t name any programs she would cut funding to other than “the Lady Bird Highway Beautification projects.”

In an interview on Sunday with The National Defense, Hartzler swore off any cuts to the Defense budget, denying that Defense costs have increased and claiming that Republicans in Congress already “passed $2.7 trillion in costs savings and cutting the budget.”

Spending on Defense actually outpaces all other discretionary spending programs combined, with estimated spending well over $708 billion in the 2011 fiscal year. In fact, defense spending is approaching 5% of US GDP and comprises about 44% of the global total of defense spending. And while Hartzler claims that “defense isn’t the area in our government where we have increased costs,” Laicie Olson of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation points out that in “inflation-adjusted dollars, the total U.S. defense budget has grown from $432 billion in fiscal 2001 to $720 billion in fiscal 2011, a real increase of approximately 67 percent.”

But perhaps even more outrageous is Hartzler’s that House have managed to cut $2.7 trillion from the budget since they took over as the majority in January. Her figure falls far short of the budget proposals by the GOP leadership, and the House Republicans’ Pledge to America is actually projected to significantly increase the deficit. While the congresswoman included the House’s symbolic vote to “repeal Obamacare” in her dramatic $2.7 trillion total, the Congressional Budget Office estimated that repealing health care reform “would ratchet up the federal deficit by about $230 billion over the next decade.”

Listen to Hartzler laud the GOP’s budget policies while distorting defense spending and coming up with imaginary budget numbers:

Defense isn’t the area in our government where we have increased the costs; it’s in these other areas of government. So let’s look at those areas and cut there, and let’s keep a priority to our men and women who are fighting a war on two fronts. Now is not the time to even be talking about cuts in my view.



We’ve only had a limited amount of time to do things, but I feel good about the three weeks that we had what we’ve accomplished. We voted to change the way Washington works, or Congress works I should say, by first and foremost in the second or third day in session we voted to cut our own House budget by five percent, saving $35 million, as a sign to show the American people that we get it and we’re going to start with us. We know that families and businesses are having to tighten their belts, and we think Washington needs to as well.

And then we have passed $2.7 trillion in costs savings and cutting the budget. Every week we are going to be voting to cut government in some way so we have been doing that and we’re going to continue doing that. And so far, if you include repealing ‘Obamacare,’ that’s $2.7 trillion that we have saved. We are serious.

Hartzler: GOP Already Cut $2.7 Trillion From Deficit, No Need to Cut Defense

Elected to Congress last November, Missouri Republican Vicky Hartzler campaigned as both a Religious Right activist and as a Tea Party adherent. But while she literally wrote the book on how and why ultraconservative Christians should run for office, she has had trouble staying true to her anti-government Tea Party rhetoric— she has received hundreds of thousands of dollars of government farm subsidies and, during her campaign, couldn’t name any programs she would cut funding to other than “the Lady Bird Highway Beautification projects.”

In an interview on Sunday with The National Defense, Hartzler swore off any cuts to the Defense budget, denying that Defense costs have increased and claiming that Republicans in Congress already “passed $2.7 trillion in costs savings and cutting the budget.”

Spending on Defense actually outpaces all other discretionary spending programs combined, with estimated spending well over $708 billion in the 2011 fiscal year. In fact, defense spending is approaching 5% of US GDP and comprises about 44% of the global total of defense spending. And while Hartzler claims that “defense isn’t the area in our government where we have increased costs,” Laicie Olson of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation points out that in “inflation-adjusted dollars, the total U.S. defense budget has grown from $432 billion in fiscal 2001 to $720 billion in fiscal 2011, a real increase of approximately 67 percent.”

But perhaps even more outrageous is Hartzler’s that House have managed to cut $2.7 trillion from the budget since they took over as the majority in January. Her figure falls far short of the budget proposals by the GOP leadership, and the House Republicans’ Pledge to America is actually projected to significantly increase the deficit. While the congresswoman included the House’s symbolic vote to “repeal Obamacare” in her dramatic $2.7 trillion total, the Congressional Budget Office estimated that repealing health care reform “would ratchet up the federal deficit by about $230 billion over the next decade.”

Listen to Hartzler laud the GOP’s budget policies while distorting defense spending and coming up with imaginary budget numbers:

Defense isn’t the area in our government where we have increased the costs; it’s in these other areas of government. So let’s look at those areas and cut there, and let’s keep a priority to our men and women who are fighting a war on two fronts. Now is not the time to even be talking about cuts in my view.



We’ve only had a limited amount of time to do things, but I feel good about the three weeks that we had what we’ve accomplished. We voted to change the way Washington works, or Congress works I should say, by first and foremost in the second or third day in session we voted to cut our own House budget by five percent, saving $35 million, as a sign to show the American people that we get it and we’re going to start with us. We know that families and businesses are having to tighten their belts, and we think Washington needs to as well.

And then we have passed $2.7 trillion in costs savings and cutting the budget. Every week we are going to be voting to cut government in some way so we have been doing that and we’re going to continue doing that. And so far, if you include repealing ‘Obamacare,’ that’s $2.7 trillion that we have saved. We are serious.

West: “Blacks Cannot Expect to Have Political Power” Since They Vote Democratic

After Michael Steele’s failed attempt to give the GOP a “hip hop” makeover, many Republicans hoped newly-elected Congressman Allen West could boost the Party’s outreach to African American voters. Today, West expressed his concerns about DC residents’ lack of representation, as Washingtonians don’t have a voting member of Congress. In one of the first votes of the session, the Republican majority stripped the DC delegate’s ability to vote in House Committees, a move West supported.

While West floated the idea of “an exclusionary zone” where “District residents do not pay federal taxes” since they don’t have a voting member of Congress, he went on to say that the African American-majority city and black voters across the country may only have themselves to blame for their political marginalization since black voters consistently support Democrats:

West, who was one of two African-American Republicans elected to the House last year, said he hopes to make the GOP more appealing to black voters.

"We need to open up the conversation because blacks cannot expect to have power in this country when they vote 90 percent Democratic," he said.

"You cannot put all of your trust in one political party. I know that blacks will not change overnight or become Republicans in large numbers overnight, but we have to have the conversation about this."

West: “Blacks Cannot Expect to Have Political Power” Since They Vote Democratic

After Michael Steele’s failed attempt to give the GOP a “hip hop” makeover, many Republicans hoped newly-elected Congressman Allen West could boost the Party’s outreach to African American voters. Today, West expressed his concerns about DC residents’ lack of representation, as Washingtonians don’t have a voting member of Congress. In one of the first votes of the session, the Republican majority stripped the DC delegate’s ability to vote in House Committees, a move West supported.

While West floated the idea of “an exclusionary zone” where “District residents do not pay federal taxes” since they don’t have a voting member of Congress, he went on to say that the African American-majority city and black voters across the country may only have themselves to blame for their political marginalization since black voters consistently support Democrats:

West, who was one of two African-American Republicans elected to the House last year, said he hopes to make the GOP more appealing to black voters.

"We need to open up the conversation because blacks cannot expect to have power in this country when they vote 90 percent Democratic," he said.

"You cannot put all of your trust in one political party. I know that blacks will not change overnight or become Republicans in large numbers overnight, but we have to have the conversation about this."